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Full text of "University of Toronto Report of the Board of Governors for the Year Ending June 30th, 1936"

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 

REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDED 3 0th JUNE 

1936 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 

Printed and Published by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 3 7 



^':j 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 

REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDED 3 0th JUNE 

1936 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 12, 1937 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 

Printed and Published by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 3 7 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2011 



http://www.archive.org/details/uoftreportgov1936univ 



UNIVERSITi' OF TORONTO 



REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

For the Year Ended 30th June, 1936 



To His Honour the Lieulenant-Governor-in-Council: 

The Governors of the Lniversity of Toronto have the honour to present their 
thirtieth annual report, with which is included the report of the President giving a 
complete review of the academic work of the University and its Colleges for the 
Session 1935-36, and the reports of various officers and departments dealing with 
the manifold activities of the institution. 

There are appended also the usual statements covering the funds and assets, 
including investments, as they stood at the close of business on 30th June, 1936, 
together with detailed statements of the receipts and expenditures of the Board for 
the fiscal year which ended on that date, and the certificate of audit of the same 
by Mr. G. T. Clarkson of the firm of Clarkson. Gordon, Dilworth and Nash. 

The auditor's report states that all the transactions of the vear upon the Revenue 
and Capital accounts have been duly audited and found correct: that the securities 
representing the investments, which are held for safekeeping bv the Canadian Bank 
of Commerce, were produced for his examination twice during the year and found 
to be in agreement with the Bursars' records; and that this officer's records are well 
kept and all endowment and trust funds properly accounted for. While a few 
municipal bonds continue in default, this is the experience of practically every 
investing corporation today; and the high character of the investments as a whole is 
shown by the fact that their market value on 30th June was greater than their book 
value by upwards of SI. 000,000. 

During the \ear the Board purchased the property on Bloor Street West, 
formerly known as McMaster University, for the sum of 8100.000 cash, the purchase 
being financed from the proceeds of the Whitney Bequest; and there are now 
accommodated in this building the departments of Economics, Social Science, and 
Geography, together with some overflow from the departments of Chemistry and 
Psychology. 

The general revenue for the year amounted to Sl,727,457. In addition there 
was credited to revenue the Legislative Grant of S900,000. making a gross total of 
$2,627,4.57. (An expected supplementary grant for the year was not voted). The 

[3] 



4 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 No. 12 

deduction from this sum of interest written to certain scholarship and trust funds, 
),799, left available for expenditures upon salaries and maintenance $2,560,658. 



The disbursements under the appropriations made by the Board for these 
purposes (exclusive of the Ontario College of Education which is supported by a 
separate vote) totalled S2,662,032. There was consequently an excess of expenditures 
over receipts of S101,374, towards which the Board had available a credit balance 
from the previous year of $55,496. The application of this sum left a final deficit 
on revenue account of $45,878. 



All of which is respectfully submitted. 



Toronto, 29th December, 1936. 



D. Bruce Macdonald, 

Chairman. 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 
For the Year Ending 30th June, 1936 



To the Governors of the University of Toronto'. 

Gentlemen: 

I have the honour to present to you, as required by statute, a report on the 
academic work of the University and of University College for the twelve months 
ending on the 30th of June, 1936: 

Introduction 

The detailed reports of the different Faculties and of Lniversity College are 
appended. I make reference only to some of the main features of the year's record. 
In submitting this report I am more than ever impressed with the magnitude, variety 
and importance of the work carried on in this University. The University is large in 
point of attendance, in number of buildings, and in the membership of its teaching 
staff. It seems that both the quality and the volume of its manifold services grow 
steadily greater year by year. The picture I have to paint is not unattractive. It is 
the portrayal of an institution throbbing with vitality, moving forward with good 
cheer and good hope. If in the future numbers decrease, it shall be our effort to 
secure the continuance of high quality. For this general progress the University is 
chiefly indebted to the fine idealism and cordial co-operation of the staff, both admin- 
istrative and academic. To them; to all alumni and friends who have shewn them- 
selves helpful; to the loyal and self -disciplined body of students; to the Chairman 
and members of the Board of Governors, who have at all times given wise counsel, 
practical aid, and timely encouragement, and to the Government which has largely 
provided for our financial needs, I offer my heartfelt gratitude. 

Attendance 

The total number of students enrolled was 794S, of whom 4979 were men and 
2969 women; 7409 being registered in the colleges and faculties and 539 in the 
departments. The number of students proceeding to degrees was 6453 and to diplomas 
909. Of the students in attendance 3919 came from Toronto, and 3263 from other 
parts of the Province of Ontario. Every county is represented. There has been an 
increase in registration of 237. 

The dominant aim of the University is not so much more students as better 
students; not so much more courses of instruction as better instruction. A universitv 
situated in a large city in a populous province inevitably will have a large number 
of students and must provide many courses of study; but the Lniversity will always 
■^eek to avoid the dangers of mediocrity in the quality of the students admitted and in 
the quality of the instruction given. The ideal of quality in higher education must 
remain the true university idea. Numbers may have to be sacrificed to quality. 

The proportion of voung people who seek a university education is largely 
determined, so the British Universities Grants Committee think, by fashion and by 
economic conditions. In Great Britain one person in every 885 goes for full-time 
study to a university; in Italy one in 808; in Germany one in 604; in France one in 
480; in the United States one in 125; in this province probably one in .300. 

[5] 



REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The Staff 

The total staff of the University and University College numbered 875, of whom 
119 were professors. 69 associate professors, 82 assistant professors, 216 lecturers, 
associates (in medicine and dentistry I and instructors in the College of Education, 
2 directors. 387 demonstrators, fellows and instructors with sessional appointments. 
In the Federated Colleges there are 112. The total number in the complete staff is 987. 

During the pasit year death has removed several members and former members 
of our staff: 

F. B. Allan, M.A., Ph.D., dean, faculty of arts, and professor of organic 
chemistrv; Wallace Seccombe, D.D.S., dean and professor, faculty of dentistry; Louis 
Allen. M.A.. Ph.D. (Chic. I. associate professor. French; H. S. McKellar, B.A., 
associate professor, French; Sir John McLennan. Ph.D., D.Sc. (Man. Liv.), LL.D., 
professor emeritus, faculty of arts; G. Chambers. B.A., M.B., formerly associate 
professor, clinical medicine; Donald M. Barton, chief gymnasium instructor. 

Their services to the University are briefly recorded. 

The whole University suffered a severe loss in the death on the 9th of January of 
Professor Francis Barclav Allan, dean of the faculty of arts. He had served as dean 
for onlv a year when an attack of illness laid him low. For more than eight months 
he struggled toward recovery amid several recurrences of his trouble, but finally 
succumbed to an acute relapse. 

Like many another of the intellectual leaders of this country he came from the 
farm, and taught school to enable him to attend the University. He graduated from 
the University of Toronto in 1893, obtaining in due course his M.A. and Ph.D. 
degrees. In 1895 he was appointed a fellow in chemistry under Professor W. H. Pike 
and for fortv consecutive years served on the staff of this University. He became 
ultimately professor of organic chemistry, and in 1934 dean of the faculty of arts, in 
succession to Dr. A. T. DeLury. He was a lucid teacher, a stimulating director of 
research, a friend and sympathetic helper of his students. 

He was an ideal member of University Councils (arts and medicine I and of 
committees. His knowledge, good judgment, conciliatory manner, and absolute 
unselfishness made his advice invaluable. His services to the Department of Education 
were highly appreciated and maintained a close and happy connection between the 
Department and the Lniversity. 

As he possessed those great fundamentals of character, which men most prize — 
straightness, decency, kindness — it is little wonder that he won the confidence and 
good will of his colleagues and students. 

Under his chairmanship the Committee on University Extension (of which Mr. 
W. J. Dunlop is the energetic director I grew apace and ventured on many new and 
needed undertakings, which have brought the work and influence of this University 
into every section of the Province. 

Dr. Louis Allen, a Canadian bv birth, came to us in 1922 from the Lniversity of 
Chicago, as an assistant professor in the department of French, and became an 
associate professor in 1926. He was an authority on the history of the French 
language. He was widelv versed in the Indian languages and dialects of this con- 
tinent, and was himself a master of many spoken languages, including Russian. After 
a visit to Russia in the summer of 1935 he came with his wife to her home at Beziers 
in France and unhappilv succumbed after an operation on the 27th of August. His 
knowledge of philology and of the development of human speech gave him notable 
prestige among scholars. He was a stimulating and incisive teacher. 

Later in the academic year, on the 11th of April, 1936, the department of French 
suffered another loss in the death of Professor Herbert Sutherland McKellar. A 
graduate of this Lniversity in 1893, he taught in the High Schools and Collegiate 
Institutes of Kemptville.Chatham. Owen Sound and London, before his appointment 
in 1917 as a lecturer in Lniversity College. He became an assistant professor in 1921 
and an associate professor in 1927. He was an extremely good teacher, and made much 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



use of phonetics in his methods of guiding students along the path of accurate pro- 
nounciation. He was a favourite lecturer in the Department of Lniversity Extension. 
After an illness which lasted since the close of the War and which affected him 
both in body and in mind, Eh". Graham Chambers passed away on the 27th of March. 
He obtained from this University his B.A. degree in 1886 and his M.B. degree in 
1889. He taught as a fellow in chemistry from 1887 to 1890, and in medicine and 
clinical medicine as demonstrator, lecturer, associate and associate professor from 
1900 till he went overseas as a Lieutenant-Colonel in the University Base Hospital. 
He had a distinguished record at Saloniki, Orpington Hospital ( as head of the 
medical staff I and at Shorncliffe (Moor Barracks Hospital). His health failed on 
his return to Canada and he lived in retirement till his death. His devoted wife who 
nursed him all these years, herself passed on to join him a few months later. Dr. 
Chambers had a winsome personality and exercised a fine influence on his students. 
Mr. Donald M. Barton, chief gymnasium instructor for the past sixteen years, 
died on November 4th. 1935. after a short illness. When Hart House was opened in 
1919 Mr. Barton was appointed to the athletic staff and since 1923 he has been the 
director of all gymnasium activities. His relations with the successive generations of 
students who came under his charge were happy and helpful. By precept and example 
he taught how to keep the body fit and to use it as an efficient instrument of the mind 
and soul. 

With startling suddenness on the 9th of October. 193.5, Sir John Cunningham 
McLennan, K.B.E.. F.R.S.. passed away on a train in France as he was returning to 
England from a meeting of the International Committee of Weights and Measures. 
He had retired in 1932 from his professorship of physics in this University and from 
the headship of the great physics laboratory, which now bears his name; but he paid 
a yearly visit to us and gave a course of lectures to the students in physics, bringing 
to them the latest European researches and results. A service was held in Convocation 
Hall on October 13th in his honoured memory. After graduating from this Universitv 
in 1892 he became a member of the staff and advanced from stage to stage of the 
academic hierarchy. He passed successively through the ranks of demonstrator, 
associate professor, professor and director of the phvsics laboratorv and Dean of the 
School of Graduate Studies. He won a national and international reputation. Though 
many posts with greater remuneration were offered to him he chose to remain in 
Toronto. He was one of the founders of the Alumni Association of this University. 
One of the xdsible results of the efforts of this group of graduates (among whom 
McLennan was the driving force) was the erection of our Convocation Hall. Catching 
the modern spirit of scientific research from such men in England as Oliver Lodge 
and J. J. Thomson, he did as much as any one man to infuse the spirit of research 
into this whole institution. In four fields he carried on his investigations — radio- 
activity and cosmic rays; low temperature and the liquefaction of helium; the 
conductivity of metals at low temperature; and spectroscopv. His discovery of the 
green line in the light of the aurora which occurs at great height, and his proof that 
this originates from the electrical discharge in oxygen taking place at great altitude 
won for him in 1928 the gold medal of the vear from the Royal Society and the 
Bakerian lectureship. To the Royal Canadian Institute and to the National Research 
Council he gave long and valuable service. His last years were devoted to the 
therapeutic use of x-rays and radium for the treatment of malignant tumours. During 
the Great War he was attached to the Admiralty. His work on the detection of 
submarines was of great value in reducing this menace to British shipping. In him 
this University had a loyal son, an arousing teacher, an untiring worker, a scientist 
of world-wide fame, and a brilliant leader in research. His influence on his students, 
many of whom are now themselves teachers, will live on in this Universitv and 
throughout the world. 

The Dean of the Faculty of Dentistry. Dr. Wallace Seccombe, succumbed on the 
16th of January to a long-continued attack of some form of anaemia. He courageously 
carried on his work almost up to the day of his death. A graduate of the School of 



8 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario in 1900, he carried on private 
practice for some years, till he was appointed secretary of the Royal College and 
became a member of the staff of the School. His special department of teaching was 
preventive dentistry. Dr. Seccombe was one of the leaders in the movement which 
led the Schoolof Dentistry to become in 192.5 the Faculty of Dentistry in the University 
of Toronto, and was its first dean. Under this arrangement the Royal College of 
Dental Surgeons resigned to the University its teaching functions, though it retained 
its licensing powers; and on the other hand, the teaching resources of the University 
became available to the dental students. 

The result of these changes have abundantly justified the wisdom of Dr. Seccombe 
and his associates. The Carnegie Corporation financed a survey of the curricula of 
the various dental schools of the continent, and of the Commission who made the 
survey Dr. Seccombe had the honour of being chosen as chairman. He founded and 
edited for twenty-five years ''Oral Health" — a magazine devoted to the science and 
practice of dentistry. As an authority on dental education his advice was sought 
throughout this continent. 

The following members of the staff" retired under the age limit: 

M. A. Mackenzie, M.A. (Tor. Camb. I . professor of mathematics; G. H. Needier. 
B.A., Ph.D. (Leip.l. professor of German; T. R. Rosebrugh, M.A., professor of 
electrical engineering; F. A. Clarkson, M.B., assistant professor, clinical medicine. 

The inexorable flight of time and the pension regulations of the University 
compel the retirement even of highly efficient instructors from the teaching staff. 
Those retiring this year have given the whole service of their active manhood to this 
University. 

Michael Alexander Mackenzie, a son of the Ven. Archdeacon Mackenzie of 
Brantford. graduated from Trinity College, Toronto, and then proceeded to Selwyn 
College, in the University of Cambridge. On his return to Canada he became 
professor of mathematics in Trinity College, Toronto, in 1895. In 1904 he was made 
an associate professor of mathematics in the University of Toronto, and in 1914 a 
full professor. His special field of work was actuarial science. He was a fellow of 
the Institute of Actuaries of England. He was constantly consulted by governments 
and institutions on the subject of pensions, and served as a vice-president of the 
Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America (under the auspices of the 
Carnegie Corporation I since its foundation. Not only was he an accurate and helpful 
lecturer, but by his membership in the Athletic Directorate of this University, and 
bv his deep interest in all intercollegiate sport he exercised a beneficent influence on 
general university athletics, and was ever a champion of clean, amateur sport. The 
Athletic Directorate of the L niversity of Toronto has erected a bronze tablet in a 
corridor of Hart House to commemorate his long and helpful services to sound 
athletics. 

George Henrv Needier graduated as a B.A. from this University in 1886, and as 
a Ph.D. from the University of Leipzig in 1890. In the following year, 1891, he was 
appointed to the staff of University College as a fellow in German and passed 
through the ranks of lecturer and associate professor to the rank of professor and 
head of the department. In conjunction with Professor A. E. Lang of Victoria College 
he wrote the High School German Grammar in use in our secondary schools. He was 
a veteran of the North West Rebellion of 1885, and was Officer Commanding the 
Overseas Training Company of the C.O.T.C. from 1916-18. He was an accurate 
scholar, and a constant advocate of a high standard of entrance into the University. 

Thomas Reeve Rosebrugh received from this University the degree of B.A. in 
1887 and of M-A. in 1893 and D.Sc. honoris causa in 1936. In 1890 he joined the 
staff of "The School of Practical Science" and in 1901 became a full professor. For 
thirty-five years he was head of the department of electrical engineering. Quiet yet 
painstaking he left his imprint on the four thousand students who passed through 
the Faculty of Applied Science in his time. He has been a pioneer and leader in the 
field of electrical engineering. His contributions to the theory of long distance 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



electrical transmission and to allied subjects have been of great practical value, and 
have won him a high place among the authorities in electrical literature. 

Dr. Frederick Arnold Clarkson, assistant professor of medicine, was in charge 
of the university medical service in the Western Hospital for the past thirteen years. 
Since 1902 he has been on our medical staff, serving as assistant demonstrator, 
demonstrator, clinician, associate, and assistant professor. He has been fully co- 
operative with his colleagues and a teacher of clarity and good judgment. 

To these members of the staff whose life energies have been built into the 
educational fabric and the student life of this Lniversity, we ofTer our heartfelt 
thanks. We hope that in their life of retirement they will still find opportunities of 
continued investigation and of public service. 

The following resigned their positions: 

J. G. FitzGerald. M.D., LL.D. (Qu. ). dean, facultv of medicine; W. A. Parks, 
B.A., Ph.D., LL.D., F.R.S., professor of geology; A. E. W^ebster, M.D., D.D.S. 
(Chic), M.D.S., LL.D., professor of operative dentistry; Miss A. L. Laird, M.Sc, 
professor of household science; M. P. West, M.A., D.Ph. (Ox.), professor of educa- 
tional research, Ontario College of Education; Mrs. M. M. Kirkwood, M.A., Ph.D., 
assistant professor of English. 

After a long illness, from which there seemed no prospect of complete recovery, 
Professor W. A. Parks, head of the department of geology and palaeontology, 
resigned his chair at the end of the academic year. He graduated from this 
University in 1892 with honours in Natural Science, winning the Daniel Wilson 
scholarship and the McMurrich silver medal. He joined the staff of the University 
in 1893 as a fellow in geology, and was one of the earliest to receive the degree of 
Ph.D. from it. He rose through every academic step from fellow to full professor 
and head of the department. Practically his whole life has been devoted to the service 
of his university and of his department. His teaching was admirable — always clear 
and stimulating. His real monument is the Museum of Palaeontology in the Royal 
Ontario Museum, which contains his remarkable collection of dinosaurs — one of the 
finest in the world. In 1934 his achievement in the field of geology gained for him 
one of the "blue ribbons" of science, a fellowship in the Royal Society. Last spring 
the Senate of this Lniversity conferred on him by special statute the degree of LL.D. 
honoris causa. Like his brother-in-law. Sir John McLennan, he was both scientist and 
Christian ; to him the long story of the rocks witnessed to the wisdom and patience of 
a personal and living God. 

For some years Dr. Albert Edward Webster had been in failing health, but he 
continued to come to his laboratory up to the end of the academic year, when his 
resignation took effect. For forty-three years he had served as a teacher of dentistry. 
Trained both as a medical practitioner and as a dentist, he was well fitted to give a 
thorough training to his students both in the theory and in the practice of dentistry. 
He was professor first of orthodontia and then of operative dentistrv from 1906 to 
1936. He was Dean of the School of Dentistry under the Royal College of Dental 
Surgeons of Ontario from 1915 to 1923. when he became honorarv dean and continued 
his teaching work as professor. As editor of the "Dominion Dental Journal" and as 
author of "A Manual for Dental Assistants" he was widely known throughout the 
ranks of his profession. His attainments were recognised by his election as a member 
or honorary member of scientific dental societies in Canada. Great Britain, the United 
States and France. In 1932 on the occasion of our international gathering of dentists 
in Toronto, this University conferred on him its honorary degree of doctor of laws; 
and in the same year he was awarded the William Jarvie Fellowship medal, given 
annually by the dentists of the State of New York for research. Few men were more 
respected and beloved by the members of his own profession. 

Before this report could be printed both Professor Parks and Professor Webster 
have passed away. 

Miss Annie L. Laird, Master of Science of Drexel Institute, who from its inception 
has been in charge of the department of household science, resigned this year in order 



10 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

that she might have opportunity for travel and a well-earned rest. The remarkable 
development of this department, founded by the generosity of the late Mrs. Massey 
Treble, is in large measure due to her foresight, energy and good judgment. Her old 
students are now filling posts of responsibility over this continent, in schools, hos- 
pitals, and public institutions. She leaves a living monument behind her. 

Dr. Michael West, an eminent student of linguistics and philology, resigned from 
his research chair in the Ontario College of Education, where for the past two years 
he has investigated the subject of vocabularies in relation to learning and speaking 
foreign languages. The results of these investigations have been published. This 
valuable research was made possible by the generous help of the Carnegie Corpora- 
tion, to which once more we offer our sincere thanks. Dr. West returned to England 
and is now connected with the Institute of Education in the University of London. 

Dr. C. B. Weld, assistant professor of physiology, left us to become professor of 
physiology in Dalhousie University, in succession to Dr. E. W. H. Cruickshank, who 
has gone to the chair of physiology in Aberdeen University, Scotland. Dr. Weld 
graduated in arts in the University of British Columbia and in medicine in the 
University of Toronto. He did valuable research work in the Connaught Laboratories, 
and served as physiologist to the Hospital for Sick Children. We follow with best 
wishes those members of our staff who have gone to other universities to undertake a 
larger work. Thev are living links of understanding and goodwill among our 
Canadian Universities. 

Mrs. Kirkwood, M.A., Ph.D., assistant professor of English in University College, 
has become Dean of Women and an assistant professor of English in Trinity College. 
She was a writer of distinction and an excellent teacher. 

The Board of Governors has suffered a loss in the unexpected death of Mr. W. 
R. Percival Parker. K.C. He contracted a cold at the funeral of a friend, and this 
speedily developed into pneumonia. Although he was but recently appointed to the 
Board, he had already shewn great interest in its work, particularly in the financial 
management of the University, and in its relation to the Conservatory of Music. Of 
this latter institution he had become a Governor. 

It became necessary to appoint three deans. Dr. F. B. Allan, the Dean of Arts, 
died during the year. Professor Brett, the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, 
very efficiently carried on the work of the Dean of Arts in addition to his own heavy 
duties, till the end of the term, when Professor S. Beatty, head of the department of 
mathematics, was appointed Dean of Arts. Dean Beatty has not only had long 
administrative experience in the Lniversity. but has also been in close touch with the 
Provincial Department of Education and the work of the secondary schools. 

Dean Seccombe of the Faculty of Dentistry, passed away during his term of office, 
and after much consideration Dr. A. D. A. Mason, professor of operative dentistry, 
was appointed to succeed him. He has had an intimate knowledge of the teaching 
work of the Faculty and of the general needs of the dental profession. 

Professor J. G. FitzGerald resigned his deanship of Medicine in order to under- 
take for the Rockefeller Foundation a survey of the methods of teaching preventive 
medicine and hygiene in the various colleges on this continent and in Europe. This 
survey will probably take a year. We have therefore granted Dr. FitzGerald leave of 
absence from his teaching work in this University till the first of October, 1937. Then 
Ave hope to welcome him back to his regular duties. During his absence Dr. Robert 
Defries and Dr. C. H. Best will have charge of the School of Hygiene and the 
Connaught Laboratories. The choice of Dr. FitzGerald for this important task is a 
fine recognition of his leadership in the field of preventive medicine and brings no 
small distinction to his own university. 

To succeed Dr. FitzGerald as Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. Dr. W. E. Gallic, 
F.R.C.S. ( Eng. I has been appointed. He is the distinguished head of the department 
of surgery, a Hunterian Lecturer in England, and one of the leading surgeons of the 
world. 



UMVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 11 

These three appointments to academic posts of pivotal importance in the Univer- 
sity have met with the heartiest approval of their colleagues. In an institution so 
large and so complicated as is this University much of the efficiency and smooth 
running of the whole depends on the character and administrative ability of the deans. 

We welcome back to our staff Professor Barker Fairley, who succeeds Dr. Needier 
as head of the department of German. For some years he taught in this department 
in Toronto until he was called to be professor of German in the University of Man- 
chester. His volume on "Goethe," issued in connection with that great poet's centenary, 
was a notable and scholarly work on the interpretation and appraisement of Goethe 
as a literary figure in Europe. He is an M.A. of both Leeds and Manchester and a 
Ph.D. of the University of Jena. Under him Germanic studies, both on the linguistic 
and the literary side, will be competently and progressively directed. 

After long and careful inquiry a successor to Miss Laird in the department of 
household science was found in the person of Miss Jessie Brodie, B.A. of this 
University, A.M. and Ph.D. of Columbia University. After taking the professional 
teacher's course in the Faculty of Education, she taught in Northern Ontario, and 
then proceeded to Columbia, where she studied under Dr. Henry C. Sherman, the 
Mitchell Professor of Chemistry in that University and the author of such standard 
books as "The Chemistry of Food and Nutrition" and "Food and Health". For the 
last six years she has taught in the George Peabody College for Teachers in Nashville, 
Tennessee. She returns to her native land and her Alma Mater with a wide experience 
and ripened judgment, well fitted to maintain and enrich the fine traditions of this 
department and to link them in sympathy with the various nutrition enterprises 
carried on in this city and province. 

The department of mathematics has been strengthened by the addition of Mr. H. 
S. M. Coxeter. B.A. and Ph.D. of the University of Cambridge, and a former fellow 
of Trinity College, Cambridge, as an assistant professor. His appointment fairly well 
rounds out the teaching personnel in mathematics. Professor Coxeter is no stranger 
to us. While he was at the Institute of Advanced Studies in Princeton, New Jersey, 
one of the chief centres of mathematical research in the world, he was a visiting 
lecturer here and won golden opinions by his lectures. 

By the aid of a Carnegie Fellowship we are able to have the services of Dr. Peter 
Brieger in the department of fine art. Dr. Brieger is a Ph.D. of the University of 
Breslau. and has more recently been on the staff of the Courtauld Institute of Fine 
Art in the Lniversitv of London. He comes with the high endorsation of Professor 
^W. G. Constable. Director of the Institute, and Slade Professor of Fine Art in the 
University of Cambridge. Dr. Brieger is bringing out an architectural atlas of 
Medieval Europe, to be published by the Oxford University Press. I am sure that his 
work as an assistant to Professor Alford will be of the most stimulating and helpful 
character. 

I regret that at the end of the term two of our senior professors have been laid 
aside bv illness — Professor W. R. Ta)lor of the department of Semitic languages in 
University College, and Professor T. L. W alker. head of the department of mineralogy. 
Arrangements will be made for the carrying on of their lectures for the coming year. 
It is our sincere hope that they both may be able to return to their work after this 
period of enforced rest. 

Professor Peter Sandiford was special lecturer in education in the University of 
California for the last half of the year. He made a real contribution to the academic 
life of that University and will return to carry on his work in the Ontario College of 
Education with a wider experience and more practical knowledge of the educational 
problems of our American neighbours. 

The best conception of a university is probably the ancient one of a society of 
scholars bound together for the purpose of preserving, imparting, increasing and 
enjoying knowledge. If this is true, then the chief asset of the university on the side 
of its equipment is its staff This group of scholars stimulate the students by teaching 
and example; they publish the results of their research and so add to the store of 



12 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

human wisdom; they arouse even the ordinary undergraduate, and they cultivate the 
best and most advanced intellects. In this way and to this extent they make their 
university great. 

For university progress and achievement no factor is so important as that of 
personnel — the competence of the men and women who constitute the administrative 
and teaching staff. When vacancies occur they must be filled with the utmost care 
and discrimination. No college can be better than its faculty. 

Of the members of our own staff we are with good reason proud. They are loyal 
and competent. The list of their publications reveals the character of the research 
work which is being carried on in the various departments; good teaching and good 
investigation are not incompatible; rather are they complementary. So far as the 
undergraduates are concerned good teaching is a necessity on the part of the staff. 
We are deeply grateful to the Government of the Province for that increase in our 
annual grant which made it possible to reduce by half the cut in salaries made 
inevitable by restricted revenues; and we trust that the day will soon come when our 
encouraging exhortations and promises especially to the junior members of our staff 
will pass into realities, and salaries will be restored to their former level. In Great 
Britain in spite of the rigid economy enforced by the great depression, the grants to 
Universities from the Imperial Treasury were never curtailed. 

1 am glad to note that throughout the University the advisory relation between 
teacher and student is being increasingly recognised. The members of the teaching 
staff are always willing and ready to give personal counsel and guidance to their 
scholars. This species of tutorial system serves both an intellectual and a moral 
purpose. The relation of teacher and pupil passes into that of older friend and 
younger friend. 

Leave of absence was granted to: 

For the session: F. B. Allan, M.A., Ph.D., dean, faculty of arts, and professor of 
organic chemistry; W. A. Parks, B.A., Ph.D.. professor of geology; J. W. Bain, 
B.A.Sc. professor of chemical engineering; M. P. West, M.A., D.Ph. (Ox.), professor 
of educational research; Miss G. R. F. Rose, M.A.. lecturer in household science. 

For one term: G. Norwood. M.A. (Camb.), D.Litt. (Wales), director of classical 
studies; P. Sandiford, M.Sc. (Man.), Ph.D. (Col.), director of educational research, 
Ontario College of Education; A. S. P. Woodhouse, B.A., A.M. (Har.), assistant 
professor of English. 

The following new appointments and promotions were made during the year:. 
In the Faculty of Arts: — Appointments: R. K. Young, B.A., Ph.D. (Cal.), 
Director of the David Dunlap Observatory; E. S. Moore, M.A., Ph.D. (Chic), acting 
head of the department of geology; Griffith Taylor, B.E. (Syd.), B.A. (Camb.), D.Sc. 
(Syd.), professor of geography; R. Brauer, Ph.D. (Berlin), assistant professor of 
mathematics; H. L. Humphreys, A.B. (Mich.), A.M. (Prin.), Ph.D. (Col.), assistant 
professor of French; M. F. Crawford, B.A. (West.), M.A., lecturer in physics; Miss 
E. J. Allin, M.A.. PhD., lecturer in physics; G. E. Britnell. B.A. (Sask», M.A., lecturer 
in political economy; C. B. Macpherson, B.A., M.Sc. (Lond.), lecturer in political 
economy; E. R. Hopkins, B.A. (Tor. Ox.). LL.B. (Sask.), lecturer in law; J. A. 
Houpert, M.A. (111.) ; Miss M. Macdonald, B.A. (Laval), Dip. de I'U. Paris, lecturers 
in French; F. S. Haines, lecturer in fine art; K. G. Gray, honrary lecturer in law; 
V. W. Bladen, M.A. (Ox.), supervisor of studies in political economy; C. W. M. Hart, 
M.A. (Syd.), supervisor of studies in sociology. 

Promotions:— G. W. Brown, M.A., Ph.D. (Chic), from an associate- 
professorship to a professorship in history; H. J. Davis, M.A. (Ox.), from an 
associate-professorship to a professorship in English; J. F. Macdonald, M.A. (Qu-). 
from an associate-professorship to a professorship in English; F. R. Lorriman, M.A., 
Ph.D., from an assistant-professorship to an associate-professorship in chemistry; 
E. W. Macdonald, B.A. (Qu. ), from an assistant-professorship to an associate- 
professorship in philosophy; M. D. C. Tait, B.A. (Ox.), from an assistant- 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 13 

professorship to an associate-professorship in Greek; A. S. P. \\ oodhouse, B.A., A.M. 
(Harv.). from an assistant-professorship to an associate-professorship in English; 
H. Grayson Smith. B.A.. Ph.D., from a lectureship to an assistant-professorship in 
physics; C. Barnes. M.Sc. (Leeds). Ph.D., from a lectureship to an assistant' 
professorship in phvsics; F. E. Beamish, M.A. (McM.), from a lectureship to an 
assistant-professorship in chemistry; G. P. Cosgrave, M.A. (Man.), Ph.D., from a 
lectureship to an assistant-professorship in psychology; Miss M. C. Needier, M.A., 
Ph.D. (Chic), from a lectureship to an assistant-professorship in ancient history; 
N. J. Endicott. B.A., B.Litt. (Ox.), from a lectureship to an assistant-professorship in 
English; F. V. Winnett. M.A., Ph.D., from a lectureship to an assistant-professorship 
in Semitics. 

In the Faculty of Medicine: — Appointments: A. Hunter. M.A., B.Sc, M.B. 
(Edin.). professor of pathological chemistry; H. J. Shields. B.A.. M.B., associate in 
anaesthesia; G. L. Duff, M.A., M.D., Ph.D.. lecturer in pathology; M. H. Roepke, 
B.A. (Kans.). M.S. (111.), M.A. (Tor.) Ph.D. (Minn.), lecturer "in pharmacology; 
E. Fidlar. B.A., M.D., lecturer in physiology. 

Promotions: — Alan Brown, M.D., from an associate-professorship to a professor- 
ship in paediatrics; William A. Scott, B.A. (McM.), M.B.. from an assistant- 
professorship to a professorship in obstetrics and gynaecology; G. E. Richards, M.B., 
from an associate-professorship to a professorship in radiology; G. M. Biggs, M.B., 
from an associateship to an associate-professorship in oto-laryngology ; R. K. George, 
B.A., M.B., D.P.H.. from a lectureship to an assistant-professorship in anatomy; E. 
T. Waters, B.Sc. Ph.D. (Wales), from a lectureship to an assistant-professorship in 
physiology; C. B. Weld, M.A. (B.C.), M.D., from a lectureship to an assistant- 
professorship in physiology; M. H. Brown, M.D., B.Sc. (Med. I, from a lectureship 
to an assistant-professorship in hygiene and preventive medicine; H. B. VanWyck, 
B.A., M.B.. from a senior demonstratorship to an assistant-professorship in obstetrics 
and gynaecology: E. A. Morgan. M.B., from a senior demonstratorship to an asso- 
ciateship in paediatrics; G. R. Pirie, M.B., from a senior demonstratorship to an 
associateship in paediatrics; A. A. Campbell, M.B., from a senior demonstratorship 
to an associateship in oto-laryngology. 

In the Faculty of Applied Science: — Promotions: B. de F. Bavly, B.A.Sc, from 
a lectureship to an assistant-professorship in electrical engineering. 

In the Faculty of Household Science: — Appointments: Miss E. W. Park, M.A., 
assistant professor; Miss M. R. McKellar, M.A., lecturer; Miss J. S. Roberts, lecturer. 

In the Faculty of Dentistry: — Appointment: A. D. A. Mason. D.D.S., dean. 

In the School of Nursing: — Appointments: Miss M. B. Millman, B.A., lecturer 
in public health nursing; Miss E. M. Stuart, lecturer in nursing. 

In the Departmentof Social Science: — Appointment: A. E. Grauer, B.A. (B.C.), 
B.C. (Ox.) Ph.D. (Cal. ), assistant professor. 

In the Department of Medical Research (Banting): — Promotions: D. A. Irwin, 
M.B.. B.Sc. (Med.), from an assistant-professorship to an associate-professorship; 
C. C. Lucas, M.A.Sc (B.C.) from a research associateship to an assistant- 
professorship. 

In the Ontario College of Education: — Appointments: G. Taylor. B.E. (Syd. ), 
B.A. (Camb. ) B.Sc. (Syd.), special lecturer, geography; L. H. Newell, B.A. (West.), 
Instructor in the University of Toronto Schools. 

Honours were conferred upon members of the staff: 

Professor C. H. Best was invited to Yale University as a visiting lecturer; 
Professor P. Edgar was awarded a gold medal from the Royal Society of Canada 
for his outstanding contribution to Canadian literature; Dr. J. G. Fitzgerald was 
appointed by the Rockefeller to serve another term as Scientific Director of the 
International Health Division, and has been asked to make a survey of the teaching 
of preventive medicine and hygiene in Canada, the United States and Europe; Mr. 
E. R. Hopkins was appointed one of the secretaries for the Rhodes Trust for the 
selection of Rhodes Scholars in Canada; Professor W. P. M. Kennedy was appointed 



14 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

a member of the Committee on Comparative Law by the Government of France, under 
the French Ministry of Justice; Dr. K. G. McKenzie was elected President of the 
Harvey Gushing Society of America; Sir Ernest MacMillan had the honorary degree 
of Doctor of Laws conferred upon him by the University of British Columbia; 
Professor T. J. Meek was elected a Trustee of the American Schools of Oriental 
Research; Professor E. S. Moore was elected Vice-President of the Society of 
Economic Geologists of America; Mr. A. F. W. Plumptre was invited to give a series 
of lectures at Cambridge University, England, on "Recent Monetary Developments in 
the British Dominions"; Miss E. K. Russell was asked to make a study of the facilities 
for advanced nursing education in England in connection with the Florence Night- 
ingale International Foundation; Dr. E, S. Ryerson was elected President of the 
Association of American Medical Colleges; Professor J. Satterly was elected President 
of the Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Literature and Art; 
Professor V. G. Smith was elected chairman of the Toronto Section of the American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers; Mr. W. S. Wallace was awarded a gold medal by 
the Royal Society of Canada for his outstanding contribution to Canadian history; 
Dr. G. E. Wilson was elected second Vice-President of the American College of 
Surgeons; Dr. Healey Willan was appointed Chairman of the Board of Examiners 
for degrees in music at Bishop's College, Lennoxville, Q. 

The University in General 

The visit in November, 1935, of Their Excellencies, the Governor-General of 
Canada and the Lady Tweedsmuir, was a most happy event in our history. They 
generously gave us a whole day of their time in Toronto, and at night were gracious 
enough to receive with the President and Mrs. Cody the members of the staff and 
their wives, who attended this annual function in the Museum — a magnificent back- 
ground for such a social gathering. About fifteen hundred were present. This 
reception affords an opportunity for our whole academic family- — belonging to all 
colleges, faculties and departments — to meet one another and to realize that they are 
members incorporate in one great university body. 

Their Excellencies sent to the University signed photographs of themselves as a 
souvenir of their visit. These now hang in the upper corridor of Simcoe Hall beside 
the photographs of Earl Grey and his wife. 

On the afternoon of Tuesday, the 28th of January, the day of the funeral of our 
late Sovereign, King George V, a memorial seivice was held in Convocation Hall. 
The order of service was that used in St. George's Chapel, Windsor. Principal Eakin 
of Knox College read the opening sentences, Provost Cosgrave of Trinity the 23rd 
Psalm, Chancellor E. W. Wallace of Victoria the lesson, Principal McElheran of 
Wycliffe read the appointed prayers, and I gave the address. The Lieutenant- 
Governor and Mrs. Bruce, the Chancellor of the University, the Minister of Education, 
members of the Board of Governors and of the Senate and a great throng of members 
of the staff and of students filled the Hall. King George received the honorary degree 
of this University on the occasion of his visit to Canada as Duke of Cornwall 
and York. 

The School of Library Science has developed steadily under Miss Barnstead's 
direction. Most public libraries in the Province now seek a librarian who has been 
trained in an efficient Library School. Some universities give a degree in library 
science to those who have taken this course. In consequence graduates of a School 
which gives no degree are at a distadvantage in seeking positions in comparison 
with those who have receive a degree. The Senate of the University therefore 
determined to extend the course in content and standard, and to grant the degree of 
Bachelor of Library Science to candidates who have successfully met the tests imposed. 
Nowhere in Canada are greater facilities available than in Toronto for a thorough 
training in librarianship. 

The Ontario Educational Association celebrated this year the seventy-fifth 
anniversary of its foundation. The University determined to mark this event by 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 15 

holding a special convocation at the annual meeting of the Association in Easter 
week for the purpose of conferring honorary degrees on the Minister of Education, 
two outstanding teachers in the secondary schools, and one veteran and progressive 
Public School Inspector. In this fashion honour was paid to the services of our 
teachers, who train the most precious assets of the Province, its growing boys and 
girls. "Ian Hay" — himself an old teacher — describes the profession to which he was 
proud to belong as "the most responsible, the least advertised, the worst paid, and 
the most richly rewarded profession in the world." 

The usual Armistice Day commemoration was held on the eleventh of November, 
under the auspices of the Alumni Federation, at the Soldiers' Memorial Tower. It 
was marked by one of the largest gatherings of students in our university history. It 
is of no small significance that in the very centre of throbbing undergraduate life 
there stands a Tower of Remembrance which constantly proclaims the sacrifice by 
which our freedom and other priceless national possessions were maintained. 

Each year we welcome to the University the convention of the editors of the 
High School journals of the Province. By their conference and bv their contact with 
the University they become more conscious of the high calling of journalism and of 
its possibilities and responsibilities. Many of these students come afterwards as 
undergraduates to this University. 

During the year the Board of Governors purchased from the Government the 
old building of McMaster University, now used to accommodate the departments of 
economics, geography and social science, and to provide additional laboratory space 
for organic chemistry and psychology. The Governors also purchased the Alfred 
Beardmore house on St. George Street, immediately south of the University College 
Women's Union. The house has been wrecked (as rehabilitation was too expensive) 
and the ground is kept for future expansion. 

The Faculty of Arts 

Under the head of "Social and Philosophical Studies" there has been prescribed 
a common first year course for modern history, philosophy, political science and 
economics, psychology and sociology. This forms a general basis for later 
specialisation. 

The long standing honour course of English and history now yields to separate 
honour courses in English and in history. Each one of these courses, however, 
contains much of the other. It is impossible to lay too much stress on the value 
of a precise and idiomatic use of our mother tongue. It is the first mark of an 
educated man, no matter what course he has taken in the Universitv. The sciences 
and the humanities find here an interest and a requirement in common. 

Last year a pass course in fine art was established. This vear begins an honour 
course as well in this most interesting subject. Such a course has a general cultural 
value, and also prepares a student for teaching art in the secondary schools. The 
number of students enrolled in this course has been so large as to demand an 
assistant to Professor Alford. As I have already noted the Carnegie Corporation 
has made it possible for us to secure the highly skilled services and scholarship of 
Dr. Peter Brieger. Thanks to the generous gift of Mr. J. W. J. Forster we have been 
able to enlarge the Fine Art Library and to procure a large number of the Medici 
reproductions in colour of famous masterpieces. The Carnegie Library of Art 
photographs has been catalogued and arranged in cases. A librarian is now in charge 
of these for eight months in the vear. Commodious quarters have been provided in 
the third floor of L^niversity College for these art treasures and for the offices of 
Professor Alford and Dr. Brieger. As I stated in last year's report, this department 
will keep teaching distinct from propaganda in the field of art. It will not be the 
prophet of any special school or group, but will seek to present to the students the 
products of successive ages for their understanding and appreciation. No education 
is complete without seeking to instil a knowledge and love of beauty. The broad 



16 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

aim of art would seem to be to represent the reality of things under the form 
of beauty. 

The new professor of geography, Dr. Griffith Taylor, gave his inaugural lecture 
on "Illustrations of the New Geography." This was attended by the Lieutenant- 
Governor, Dr. Bruce. Dr. Camsell, the president of the Canadian Geographical 
Society, Dr. Joerg of the American Geographical Society, and Professor Preston 
James of the University of Michigan. Thus was auspiciously launched this 
University's new venture in geography — the story of the background of man's history ; 
the description, localisation and explanation of the facts which relate man to his 
material environment. In his first year of work here Professor Taylor has aroused 
general interest in his subject and has specifically given courses in economic 
geography. Alreadv it looks as though his regular course which will begin in the 
academic year 1936-37 will be crowded, and will demand further accommodation and 
assistance in teaching. 

The new buildings of St. Michael's College will be opened in the autumn, and 
will house the Institute of Mediaeval Studies. This Institute under its able staff, 
which includes Professor Edouard Gilson and Professor Jacques Maritain of Paris, 
as well as Father Phelan and his colleagues, has already become famous on the 
continent as a seat of philosophical studies. We are grateful to Professor Gilson 
for his kindness in giving to the whole University a course of four lectures on 
DesCartes and his philosophy. It is our hope that in the next year or two we may 
add a mediaeval historian to the general history staff of the Lniversity. 

The Law Club, embracing all the students in the department of law, gave a 
complimentary dinner to their head. Professor W. P. M. Kennedy, on the 17th of 
March — a delicate reference to Dr. Kennedy's nationality. In acknowledging this 
remarkable tribute of respect. Professor Kennedy referred to the development of 
legal studies in this University and to the present day scientific approach to the 
study of legal principles. Professor Kennedy and his colleagues are editing the 
Universily of Toronto Law Journal and are thereby making a great contribution to 
the furtherance of legal scholarship in Canada. Professor Auld is one of the editors 
of the "Laws of Canada", the Canadian parallel (on a smaller scale of course) to 
Halsbury's monumental volumes "The Laws of England". Professor Norman 
Mackenzie has been giving much attention in public addresses to problems in 
connection with the League of Nations and with international relations in general. 

On the 9th of December, 1935, the University commemorated the 2000th 
anniversary of the birth of the famous Roman poet Horace. The President took the 
chair at a well-attended public meeting and Professor DeWitt of Victoria read a 
paper on "The Life and Thought of Horace", while Professor L. A. Mackay of 
University College read a paper on "The Art and Influence of Horace." 

Professor Homer Thompson returns from Greece for half of the academic year 
to give his lectures in classical archaeology. The other half of the year he spends in 
actual excavation work under the American School in Athens. He has been a leader 
in excavating the Agora or ancient marketplace of Athens. Some of his brilliant 
topographical conjectures have been verified by the actual digging. On his own 
account he has continued his special work of excavating the Acropolis in and about 
the Pnyx — where the Athenian orators stood to harangue their fellow-citizens. The 
remarkable results of this excavation has been published as "Pnyx and Thesmop- 
torion" (reprinted from the famous magazine of Classical Archaeology, Hesperia) . 
This immediate contact between the field of excavation and the lecture-room adds 
life and interest to Professor Thompson's teaching. 

A new combined course in biology and physics has been established which, it is 
expected, will deal presently with the problems of modern refrigeration. 

Graduate courses in Chinese archaeology and history have been approved by the 
Senate. Bishop White, the associate professor in this department, is looking forward 
to a class of students in this field. The unique collection of Chinese art and the 
Chinese library of 45,000 volumes should make Toronto, under Bishop White's 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 17 

leadership one of the great centres of Chinese studies on this continent. Bishop 
White attended the remarkable exhibition of Chinese art held last winter in London, 
and is still enthusiastic over the marvel of our own collection in the Museum. 

The late Sir John McLennan left a bequest of $5,000 to the department of physics, 
together with his books and papers. This sum of money may be used for the benefit 
of the department in any way that may from time to time be determined. In all 
probability an additional fellow will be financed from it for the coming year. 

Faculty of Medicine 

In the Banting Institute readjustment of rooms has been made to provide 
reasonable accommodation for Dr. Hall's research work. Already this building, so 
recently erected, is becoming crowded and some addition, perhaps by way of an 
additional story, is urgently required. 

The Branch of the Connaught Laboratories established in Vancouver in con- 
nection with the University of British Columbia and the Provincial Department of 
Health has rapidly expanded under Dr. Dolman's direction, and further extension 
must be considered. 

On the home farm of the Connaught Laboratories extensive reconstructions, 
adjustments and additions have been made to the buildings at a cost of about 
S100,000, paid out of the earnings of the Laboratories. Fifteen more acres of land 
have also been purchased. 

Mr. E. C. Fox has succeeded Mr. Mark H. Irish as Chairman of the Board of 
the Toronto General Hospital. 

Intensive courses for graduates and men in medical practice have been held in 
the departments of surgery and paediatrics. In each class about thirty were enrolled. 
The holding of such refresher courses will likely become a regular event each year. 

The spirit of research permeates this Faculty to a remarkable degree. It has 
been possible to carry on medical researches even through days of financial de- 
pression, because of the various special funds from which grants could be made 
— such as the Banting and Best Funds, the Banting Research Foundation, the Insulin 
Royalties and the Connaught Laboratories Fund. I do not think that this fact is 
sufificiently realized. The field for further medical research is wide and can be more 
fully occupied if funds are forthcoming. 

Faculty of Applied Science 

On January 29th in the theatre of the Royal Ontario Museum the University 
celebrated the two hundredth anniversary of the birth of James Watt, the pioneer 
in the use of the steam engine. Dean Mitchell gave an introductorv address and two 
illustrated lectures were given — one by Professor Angus of the department of 
mechanical engineering on "The Inventions of James Watt" and the other by Professor 
E. A. Allcut on "The Influence of James Watt in Modern Industry." Such com- 
memorations remind modern folk of their debt to the past and throw into relief the 
great figures in the development of present-dav civilisation. 

The Engineering Society celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of its birth bv a 
conference and reunion. Many eminent engineers returned to their old training 
school and discussed pressing engineerng problems. 

Much consideration is being given to the development of a course in aero- 
dynamics and aeronautics for students who are properly prepared for it. Increas- 
ing interest in air-travel over the ocean and over the continent has quickened the 
pace of engineering research on which depends the future of such transportation. 
The wind tunnel has been placed in charge of a committee consisting of the President 
of the University, the Dean of the Faculty, and Professors Angus Young, Loudon 
and Burton, so that as wide use as possible be made of it under proper supervision. 

There has been some demand for a course in Sanitary Engineering and this has 
been met by a temporary arrangement. But it may well be that permanent provision 



18 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

should be made. The problem of the disposal of waste is so intimately associated 
with the promotion and preservation of public health that it has become one of the 
most important which confronts modern civilisation and must be faced by every civil 
engineer. Our engineering faculty must be a leader in meeting every new" demand 
of social need. 

The Wallberg bequest has furnished this Faculty with another grant for its 
student loan fund. Soon this fund will be measurably selfsustaining. From the 
same source have come the funds asked for certain specific researches, and for 
certain additional equipment in the department of chemical engineering, such as a 
higher-pressure filter press, an autoclave, a heat exchanger, an absorption tower, and 
a reconditioned fractionating still. This last equipment has made it possible for the 
teaching staff to illustrate by actual process the theoretical teaching of the text- 
books and the lectures. 

The School of Architecure continues its annual exhibition of watercolour sketches 
made bv its senior students during their stay at the Survey Camp on the shore of 
Gull Lake. Some of the sketches reveal remarkable artistic power, and all show the 
beauty of this open-air practice in drawing and colouring. The Royal Architectural 
Institute of Canada conducts a yearly student competition. In the Class "A" 
Exhibition Building the first medal was won by Mr. W. A. Salter of our Toronto 
School and the second by Mr. J. F. C. Smith also of our School of Architecture. 
Five other students of this School received "first mention" and "mention." 

The problem of more space, especially for chemical engineering still 
confronts us. 

The Graduate School 

For the last few years the number of students has remained practically the same, 
nearly 600. This department of our w ork is of the highest importance. A university 
gains rank among the great universities of the world by the excellence of its post- 
graduate work. Our departments vary in their attraction to graduate students. 

The years of depression have undoubtedly increased the number of enrolments. 
Scarcity of employment has had an influence in prolonging the period of preparation 
for the enlarging opportunities of better times. It is, however, problematical whether 
or not the coming of improved economic conditions will decrease the number of 
graduate students. There really seems to be a strong tendency to prolong preparation, 
and this tendency may not be easily reversed. 

Each graduate student is an individual problem and must be dealt with by 
himself. Real scholars — and such scholars a graduate school seeks to train — 
cannot be produced by mass instruction. Those enrolled in this School come from 
all parts of the Dominion and beyond its bounds. The special growth of this 
University must be along the line of developing postgraduate instruction, and of 
providing postgraduate laboratories and libraries. This will be probably one of our 
distinctive contributions to higher education in Canada. 

In this School, we sorely need open fellowships of the value of S500 or more. 

University Extension 

No department of the University has made greater or more permanent advances 
than this Department of Extension under the progressive and far-seeing direction of 
Mr. Dunlop. A new feature of this year's work was the provision of a course in 
Public Administration. It was attended by 90 men and women from different parts 
of the Province. The Hon. Mr. Croll. the Minister of Public Welfare, addressed 
the opening session and experts in finance, economics and administration took charge 
of the courses of lectures. Larger plans will be carried out in the coming session. 
\^ e are glad to note that other universities have been by this effort stirred to provide 
similar courses. Municipal administration touches every citizen so closely that any 
improvement effected in it brings benefit to the whole community. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 19 

In the different groups of the Teachers Courses 1805 teachers have been served. 
No students are keener than are teachers. The broadening and enriching of mind 
and personalitv, gained in the studies leading to a degree through these courses, must 
leact beneficially on the whole body of pupils in our elementary schools. 

7,142 adults have been engaged in continuous courses of study under this 
department, and probably more than 30.000 in addition have taken advantage of 
extension and public lectures. 

With the work of this department is closely linked the growth of the general 
Adult Education movement. For the past two years there has been in existence a 
Canadian Adult Education Association, of which Mr. Dunlop is president, and Mr. 
Corbett (formerly of the University of Alberta) is organising secretary. Universities, 
Provincial Departments of Education, Women's Institutes, the Y. M. C.A., the 
Y. W. C. A., and other voluntary agencies can combine to systematise and advance 
this much-needed endeavour. People are discovering that they can acquire knowledge 
as readily in adult life as in youth. 

The demand for more systematic adult education has increased and become 
urgent as a result of at least three factors: (a) unemployment and the tendency 
towards shorter working hours; (6l the realisation by people generally that thev 
need a better understanding of national and international affairs and of their 
influence on local conditions; (cl the increase of libraries, radios, programmes of 
study and summer schools and such like facilities offered by university extension 
departments. To meet this demand all the agencies concerned, libraries, universities, 
education departments, and voluntary organisations are seeking to provide education 
for adults, with a view to caring for those who have missed educational opportunities 
in earlier life; for those who are trying to keep up with the changing and growing 
content of knowledge; for those who would gain appreciation and enjoyment in art, 
music, literature, and nature; for those who would fill leisure with interest and 
increased power of service. I believe that the great next forward step in the world 
of knowledge will be taken in the field of adult education. Never was there greater 
need for knowledge and clear thinking. The acuteness of the need will evoke the 
answer. I believe that this University will continue to take a leading part in 
developing and supporting all sound schemes of adult education. 

Lnder the supervision of this Department of University Extension, a general 
plan of co-operation between the Physical Education department of the University 
and the Margaret Eaton School has been carried out on the lines laid down by the 
Senate of the Lniversity. The Lniversity provided for the Margaret Eaton School 
anatomy courses for junior and senior students. English for the junior class and 
psychology for the senior class. The Margaret Eaton School provided for the 
University facilities for remedial gymnastics and massage for the first and second 
year classes in physiotherapy; the gymnasium three hours a week for the use of the 
Women's Athletic Association; a course in the theory and practice of gymnastics for 
first year students of physiotherapy and occupational therapy; and a course in 
remedial gymnastics for the second year class in occupational therapy. 

The Library 

A university library is no longer regarded as a mere incidental appendage to the 
lecture-room. It is an essential factor in the educative process for both under- 
graduates and graduates. The vast strides made in recent years in certain branches of 
knowledge and the enormous output of the printing press have emphasized the 
function of the library in the work of the university. If a universitv "does not look 
to its books, it both fails to meet its responsibilities and takes the sure road to 
decline." 

The number of books handled in our library increased bv 13.000 or 4% over 
the previous year. The total circulation was 370,004, of these 330,579 were used by 
undergraduates. Dominion taxes have diminished our purchasing power by S1500. 



20 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

We are now confronted with an increasing circulation and a growing congestion 
in our stack rooms, our work rooms and our reading rooms. If any friend of the 
university would give a new or an enlarged library building and a corresponding 
endowment for books and periodicals, he would confer on the whole cause of higher 
education in Canada a benefit of lasting and incalculable value. Donations of any 
sums, large or small, for the purchase of books and scientific journals, w^ould help 
us in our present necessities. It is in the field of graduate studies that this need 
is most keenly felt. 

Health Service 

Increasing attention is being paid in all universities to the physical health of the 
students, both men and women. As the ancient Greeks sought it in their "gymnastic", 
so are we moderns seeking to make the body a fit and trained instrument of a fit and 
tiained mind and character. 

Dr. Porter's statement about the health of the men students is reassuring. The 
number examined was 1742 i apart from those at the Ontario College of Education, 
V. ho are examined by a special board I . Of these 94 per cent, are fit for physical 
exercises, four per cent, require corrective exercises; and only two per cent, are 
physically unable to take exercise. Dr. Edith Gordon's report on the women is as 
satisfactory as it can be without a gymnasium. Every precaution is taken to detect 
incipient weakness and to applv the proper remedies. As a result of the exercises 
taken and prescribed, there is noted a general improvement in the physical condition 
of students in their second year. 

I am glad to state, after consultation with Mr. Warren Stevens, the general 
athletic director, that the number of students who actually take part in sports and 
games is about 2.000. It is better to play some game than to watch others play. 

There has been a fear expressed in some of the universities of the old world 
that their students would not submit to a compulsory medical examination or to 
supervision of games: thev would refuse to be "regimented." But we have not found 
this to be the case. This obedience to a wholesome regulation is found to result in 
real freedom, freedom from disease, low spirits, inertia. 

Dr. Gossage is now in attendance at the surgery in the athletic side of Hart 
House between the hours of 5 and 6:30 to deal promptly with any accidents that may 
occur either on the playing field or in the gymnasium. 

The School of Nursing 

This year marks the completion of four years of the experiment inaugurated 
for the better training of Public Health Nurses. The first graduating class of eight 
received their diplomas as Public Health Nurses after a period of three years' 
training, during which they have been fitted to be both hospital and bedside nurses 
as well as fully competent public health nurses. It is into this latter field they now 
proceed. The School has trained registered nurses for public health nursing by an 
intensive additional one-year course, and for posts of teaching and administration 
in hospitals. 

In response to pressing demands, refresher courses have been held alternately 
for hospital and for public health nurses. For one month about 160 nurses ( at the 
rate of 24 a month I from the various hospitals in Toronto and outside it come for 
teaching in the preventive and public-health aspect of their training. 

This School is evidently meeting a real need in the community and is setting 
a high standard. 

Student Activities 

Details of these will be found in the reports of the Warden of Hart House and 
the Secretary of the Athletic Directorate. In addition, there are numerous student 
organisations in connection with special courses and departments, such as the Com- 



U.MVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 21 

merce Club, and the Historical Club, and for purposes of general discussion and 
study, such as the Debates Union of Hart House. 

The Dining Hall in Hart House is still meeting with competition from outside 
restaurants. Its equipment has been greatly improved by the provision of comfort- 
able chairs I through the generosity of the Massey Foundation I . Most of the 
university student organisations hold their annual festival gatherings in Hart House; 
I sincerelv hope thev ^vill continue to do so. Hart House through its many-sided life 
contributes to the unification in sentiment of the constituent parts of the Lniversity. 
University authorities in all parts of the ^vorld know of its constitution and its 
accomplishment and pav it the tribute of admiration and imitation. Dr. Priestlv. the 
\ ice-Chancellor of Melbourne Lniversity (a brother-in-law of our own Professor 
Griffith Tavlor ) visited Hart House in the spring and gave careful and appreciative 
study to its place in our common university life. 

One of the most interesting events of the year in Hart House is the dinner at 
the beginning of the term for all the members of the various committees who have 
charge of the manifold activities of the House. Lsually about 130 are present. 

It must always be remembered that students through experience of these 
voluntary organisations take no small part in their own education, and often win 
the inestimable boon of life-long friendships. 

The Student Administrative Council, the chief undergraduate representative 
body, becomes increasingly useful. I wish to thank the Council and its secretaries 
for their understanding co-operation throughout the year. I congratulate them on 
their excellent financial management, whereby they are able to give substantial 
assistance to manv student organisations, such as the Band and the Orchestra, and to 
carry on their most successful Loan Fund. Another development of the Council is 
the Employment Bureau, which has rendered great help to students in search of work. 

The teams which have represented the L^niversity in different sports have "played 
the game", even when thev have not won the championships. The Senior Rugbv 
Team plaved splendidly throughout the series of intercollegiate games, although it 
was beaten by a narrow margin in the "play-off' . 

The C. 0. T. C. has been up to full strength. Colonel Cockburn has been 
succeeded in the command by Colonel H. H. Madill. Our present Sovereign some 
time ago remarked with truth that "all discipline is not a training for war". I 
believe that things far deeper and more subtle than a university Officers Training 
corps are needed to make a nation war-minded. 

The Alumni Federation 

Lnder the new secretary. Mr. Bvron Wood, and its president. Dr. Deadman of 
Hamilton, the Federation is seeking to "lengthen its cords and strengthen its stakes", 
to extend and to consolidate its work. The Monthly has come out in a new format. 
and plans are being prepared for the Home-Coming in October. The loyalty and 
helpfulness of our graduates are very real, but they must be organised and combined. 
The Lniversity depends upon the goodwill of the people. That goodwill can best be 
created bv the services which the Lniversity renders to the Province, and the highest 
form of that service is ambodied in the "graduate" as a good citizen. The Lniversity 
is rightly judged by its human product. It is from our universities that must come 
men and women some of whom will be wise leaders and some intelligent followers. 
The country needs both. 

The secretary hopes to visit and organise alumni associations in various Canadian 
centres, so that there may be developed a sense of unified academic allegiance. Local 
associations could render great help to able students in these days by providing yearly 
scholarships in this Lniversity for voung men and women from their immediate 
neighborhood. 



22 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

The University Lands 

A recent visit to the Survey Camp on Gull Lake has not only made me realise 
the value of this fine practice ground for the civil engineering class, the students 
in architecture, and the group in geology, but has reminded me of the amount of 
land the University possesses around its various buildings. 

At Gull Lake are 172 acres; around the Observatory are 177 acres; at the 
Connaught Laboratories are 75 acres; and here in the heart of a great city 71 acres 
(apart from additional holdings of the Federated Colleges); in all the University 
owns 49.5 acres. 

University Buildings 

The Superintendent of Buildings, Colonel LePan, has a task the magnitude of 
which is not often realised. On his office staff 14 persons are required. The buildings 
under the control of the University (not including the buildings of the Federated 
Colleges) number 57. The number of employees (carpenters, electricians, painters, 
plumbers, tinsmiths, labourers, cleaners, caretakers, and others ) is 276. Employees 
salaries and wages amount to S310,241. Customs entries reach a total of 1169. The 
financial turnover at the Post Office is S32,747. The accounts for lighting amount to 
So5,371. and for coal to 8101,435. The repairs and renewals cost S71,655, which 
is less than one-half of one per cent of the replacement value. It is worthy of note 
that the buildings are well kept up, even though there is a minimum of expenditure 
on them. 

There is much beauty in many of our university buildings and in the open 
spaces about them. Indeed the university group forms one of the chief architectural 
attractions of this city. 

The Board of Governors through its Chairman and a committee is giving careful 
consideration to the plans, cost and maintenance of a gymnasium for the women 
students of the Lniversity. The problem of financial maintenance and of the necessary 
fee to be charged is not easy to solve; yet I trust that as soon as possible we may 
begin the erection of such a building. The health of the women students would be 
benefitted thereby. 

Visiting Lecturers 

During the vear the following special lectures were delivered: 
On the Alexander Foundation a course of three lectures by Dean F. B. Snyder of 
Northwestern University on "Robert Burns: his personality, his reputation, his art"; 
a lecture by Professor F. Baldensperger, formerly professor of comparative literature 
at the Sorbonne, on "Les assises de la comedie humaine de Balzac"; a lecture-recital 
by Rev. Edmund H. Fellowes, director of the choir of St. George's Chapel, Windsor, 
England, on "Tudor-music", in association with the Tudor Singers of Toronto; a 
lecture by Mr. Richard Finnic, explorer, Ottawa, on "Wandering through French 
Canada"; a lecture bv Professor R. H. Fowler, Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, 
England, on "Co-operative phenomena in matter"; a lecture by Miss Marjorie Gullen, 
chairman and director of studies of the Speech Fellowship and Institute, London, 
England, on "Choral speaking as a contribution to education"; the Donald C. Balfour 
lecture by Dr. Melvin S. Henderson, professor of orthopaedic surgery. Mayo Founda- 
tion Graduate School, Rochester, Minn, on "Orthopaedic Surgery: an historical 
review"; a lecture by Mr. C. W. Jenks of the Legal Section, international Labour 
Office, League of Nations, on "Federal States as members of the International Labour 
Organisation"; a lecture by Professor K. Kuratowski. on "The generalised theory of 
functions of a real variable"; a lecture by Professor H. Ries, head of the department 
of geology. Cornell University, on "Some recent advances in the geology and 
utilisation of the non-metallics"; ten lectures by Dr. Ludwig Silberstein, consulting 
mathematician, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y., on "Discrete Spacetime"; 



UNIVERSITY OF TOROISTQ FOR 1936 23 

the inaugural lecture by Professor Griffith Taylor of the department of geography, on 
"Illustrations of the new geography"; a lecture by Professor H. C. Urey, department 
of physics, Columbia University, on "Methods for the separation of Isotopes"; a 
lecture bv Sir Alfred Zimmern. professor of international relations, Oxford University, 
on "The International Outlook." 

In connection with the department of physics a series of twelve lectures by 
Dr. W. H. Kohl, research laboratory, Rogers Radio Tubes Company, Toronto, on 
"Electron optics. Thermionic Emission, Uuminescent Screens"; eight lectures by 
Dr. B. Haurwitz, Carnegie Fellow in Meteorology, on "The Physics of the higher 
Atmosphere." 

University College Department of English arranged an interchange of lectures 
between Professor H. J. Davis and Professor Devane of the English staff of Cornell 
University. 

The following lectures were given in Convocation Hall under the auspices of 
the Royal Canadian Institute: 

By Professor J. Ellis Thomson on "The Minerals that surround us"; Mr. James 
I. Hambleton. Department of Agriculture. Washington, D.C. on "The Realm of the 
Honey-Bee": Professor Harlow C. Shapley. Harvard College Observatory. "Survey- 
ing the Outer Universe"; Dr. Arthur L. Day, Geophysical Laboratory. Carnegie 
Institution. Washington, D.C, "Hot Springs of Yellowstone Park"; Dr. H. T. Gussow, 
Dominion Botanist. Ottawa. "Botanic Gardens for Canada"; Dr. Raymond C. Dearie, 
Department of Physics, University of Western Ontario, "Physical Science in the 
Practice of Medicine"; Dr. David J. Price. Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, U.S. 
Department of Agriculture. "The Dynamite of Dust"; Dr. Burton T. Simpson. State 
Institute for the Studv of Malignant Disease. Buffalo. N.\., "The Cancer Problem"; 
Mr. Frank Pullen, Naturalist, Oakville. Ont.. "With a Movie Camera in East Africa"; 
Professor W. L. Holman, "A medical study of famous people"; Professor C. T. 
Currelly, "Two Ancient Countries, Ontario and Egypt"; Professor L. C. Coleman, 
"The Story of Sugar Cane"; Mr. George 0. Sanford, Engineering Division, Bureau 
of Reclamation. Department of Interior, \^ ashington. D.C. "Boulder Dam"; 
Professor Griffith Tavlor. "A Scientist in the Antarctic;" Dr. Frank Oastler. Naturalist 
and Explorer, New York, "Alaska and the Stikine"; Dr. C M. Hincks, National 
Committee for Mental Hygiene. "Man's Last Spectre"; Professor A. 0. Gross, Bow- 
doin College. North of Battle Harbour": Professor A. P. Coleman. "Volcanoes of 
Mexico"; Dr. C E. K. Mees, Eastman Kodak Company. Rochester, N.Y., "Some 
recent progress in astronomical Photography' . 

The following delivered lectures under different departments of the University: 

Dr. T. Z. Koo, on "The Contribution of Christianity to China"; Sir Francis 
Floud. British High Commissioner in Canada, on "Canadian Agricultural Products 
in the British Market": Dr. S. Pettersson of the Meteorological Service, Bergen, 
Norway, on "Fundamental Principles of Air Mass Analysis"; Dr. L. R. Broster, of 
Charing Cross Hospital and University of London, on "Change of Sex"; Dr. T. 
Kagawa of Japan, on "Religious Conditions in Japan". 

Visitors 

Among the visitors during the year were: 

Dr. F. H. Spencer, former chief inspector under the London County Council 
as a representative explaining British policies and systems in education: Dr. R. E. 
Priestly. Vice-Chancellor of the University of Melbourne. Australia. On the occasion 
of the 25th anniversarv of the Overseas Education League the following: Mr. G. T. 
Hankin. staff-inspector. Board of Education. London; Mr. D. D. Anderson, inspector 
of schools. London; Mr. W. D. Cousins, director of education. Londonderry and 
Limavadv: Mr. T. J. Rees. director of education for Swansea. Wales; Mr. W. A. F. 
Hepburn. Director of education for Ayrshire. Scotland: Dr. J. E. Smart, director of 
education for Acton, London; Mr. W. A. Brockington, director of education for 



24 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Leicestershire; Mr. F. H. Toyne, education officer for Brighton, England; Mr. E. M. 
Rich, education officer for London; Mr. E. Salter Davies, director of education for 
Kent; Mr. T. B. Tilley, director of education for Durham; Mr. J. A. Peart, director 
of education for Winchester. 

Learned Societies 

The following learned societies met at the University: 

The American Ornithologists Union; The Association of American Medical 
Colleges. 

Special Convocations 

Special Convocations were held: 

November 27th, when the degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, was conferred 
upon His Excellency Lord Tweedsmuir, Governor-General of Canada; April 14th, in 
connection with the 75th anniversary of the founding of the Ontario Educational 
Association, when the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon: The 
Honourable L. J. Simpson, Minister of Education for Ontario, Mr. H. R. H. Kenner, 
Principal of Peterborough Collegiate and Vocational School, Mr. J. H. Putman, 
Chief Inspector of Public Schools, Ottawa, Miss M. E. Spence, formerly of Parkdale 
Collegiate Institute, Toronto; on June 3rd when the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Laws was conferred upon The Honorable Horace Harvey, Chief Justice of Alberta, 
Dr. G. F. Kay, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, University of Iowa, and in 
absentia upon Professor W. A. Parks, Department of Geology; the honorary degree 
of Doctor of Science upon Professor R. S. Lillie, University of Chicago, Professor 
T. R. Rosebrugh, Department of Electrical Engineering, and in absentia upon Dr. 
W. H. Collins, Director of the Geological Survey of Canada; the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Music upon Mr. W. H. Hewlett, Principal of the Hamilton Conservatory 
of Music. 

Portraits 

The portrait of Dr. Althouse, now Dean of the Ontario College of Education, 
was presented to the University of Toronto Schools, of which for years he was the 
headmaster, and hangs beside the portrait of his predecessor, H. J. Crawford, and his 
great teaching colleague, Dr. T. M. Porter. 

A portrait of Dr. C. F. Heebner, the Dean of the Ontario College of Pharmacy, 
was presented to him by the Ontario Druggists Association, and by him was 
presented to the College. 

Sir John McLennan's portrait by Augustus John, R.A., hangs in the library of 
the McLennan Laboratory. It was the gift of a group of his friends. 

Benefactions 

During the year the University has received the following benefactions, totalling 
$100,968.68: 

From the Rockefeller Foundation: Child Research and Parent Education, 
$19,968.23, School of Nursing, $17,500; Eaton Endowment, $25,000; Carnegie 
Corporation: Fine Art, $7,511.50, Workers' Educational Association, $2,543.75, 
Fellowship in Physics, $2,410.50; Estate of the late Sir John McLennan, $5,000, 
also books, papers and instruments; Canadian National Committee for Mental 
Hygiene, for psychiatry, $4,354.36; Reuben Wells Leonard Fellowship and Scholar- 
ships, $3,500; Flavelle-Peacock Lectureship: Sir Joseph Flavelle, $1,250, Sir Edward 
Peacock, $1,250; Graduate Fellowships: Sir Joseph Flavelle, $500, Imperial Oil 
Limited, $500, Estate of the late Sir Edward Kemp, $500; Standard Brands Research 
Fund, for chemistry, $1,002.65; D. A. Dunlap Memorial Scholarships, $1,000; 
J. W. L. Forster Library Fund, for fine art, $1,000; Robert Simpson Company 
Scholarships, $550; St. Margaret's College Old Girls' Association, for Florence M. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 25 

Neelands Prize, S520: Alma Anderson Bastedo Memorial Prize, $512.50; Sir Edmund 
Walker Scholarship. S450; Robert Bruce Scholarship, S421.39: Gertrud Davis 
Exchange Fellowship. S400; L niversity College Alumni Matriculation Scholarship, 
S400; S. R. Parsons Scholarship. Commerce and Finance, S250; J. B. \^ illmott 
Scholarships in Dentistry, S250; Canadian Dental Association Research Fund, S200; 
Anonymous, for Mary Keenan Award. 8200; Social Science Scholarships: 
Anonymous, SIOO. St. Margaret's College Alumnae Scholarships. 875; Boiler Inspec- 
tion and Insurance Company Scholarship, mechanical engineering, 8150; George 
Kennedy Scholarship. 8130.56; Sarah Kennedy Scholarship, 8130.56; Sir John Eaton 
Memorial Scholarship. L niversity Schools. 8120; Maurice Hutton Matriculation 
Scholarship. 8100: Darling and Pearson Prizes in Architecture. 8100; Pan-Hellenic 
Association Prizes. 8100; Toronto Brick Company Prizes, architecture, 8100; 
L niversity College Alumnae Scholarship, 8100: T niversity Tours Association 
Scholarship. 8100: Canadian Engineer Prize. 8100; Ramsay Wright Scholarship, 
S81.42; McCaul Scholarship in Classics: Professor M. Hutton, 837.50, Professor G. 0. 
Smith for group. 817.00: Lamba Chi Alpha Alumni of Toronto for Ronald S. 
Saddington Medal, pathology, 853.50; Hollywood Theatre Prizes in French, 850.00; 
Dr. R. A. Reeve Prize in Medicine. 850: F. \^ . Jarvis Bursaries. 850; Toronto 
Women's League of the United Synagogue Scholarship, Medicine, 850; Hon. Mr. 
Justice Riddell and Mrs. Riddell for Riddell Scholarship in Law, 830; Pakenham 
Memorial Prize. $25; Engineering Institute of Canada Prize, $25; University College 
French Society Prize. 825; Ontario Medical Association Prize, 825; American Society 
of Heating and Ventilating Engineers, 825; Canadian Medical Institute Prize, $25; 
Alumnae Prize in English. 810; Tracy Scholarship in Philosophv. 810; Maurice 
Cody Memorial Scholarship, L niversity Schools. 810; Professor G. 0. Smith for 
Fletcher-Johnston Prize. 810; Sundrv items, 828.26. 

In addition to the above a water-colour painting of the L niversity of Toronto 
in 1876 by Lucius O'Brien was presented by tAvo Governors of the L niversity of 
Toronto. 

We acknowledge these manv contributions with sincere appreciation and a lively 
sense of gratitude. I believe that the donors will experience an equal sense of 
satisfaction, as thev observe how their gifts are fulfilling the purpose they had in 
mind and are in so many cases making it possible for able, though needy, students 
to complete their courses and to become fit for a useful life-service. 

Scholarships 

Several new scholarships and prizes have been contributed during the past year: 
The Mary Keenan award of 8200 in political science; the Pakenham Memorial Prize 
in the Ontario College of Education; the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada 
Gold Medal, at graduation in architecture; the Caroline Macdonald Memorial award, 
to be given to a Japanese student who is studying Social Science in this University; 
the Toronto Women's League of the United Synagogue prize in second year medicine; 
the H. R. Bain Scholarship of $200, at matriculation into the Faculty of Applied 
Science. 

The Board of Governors has defined the conditions under which remission of 
tuition fees will accompany the winning of scholarships: Matriculation scholarships 
in Arts (1) carry remission of fees equivalent to the cash value of the scholarship; 
(2) this remission is continued through the course only if the student holds his first- 
class standing in the examinations. All scholarships in the subsequent years of the 
course carrv no remission of tuition fees. These decisions of the Board were agreed 
to by the Federated Colleges. 

For the purpose of encouraging graduate research work the existing graduate 
scholarships and fellowships carry complete exemption from tuition fees for the year 
in which the scholarship is held. 

The details of the award of the Reuben Wells Leonard scholarships in University 
College have also been settled between the Toronto General Trusts Corporation and 



26 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

the Governors of the University. At matriculation there will be four scholarships of 
$300 each, available for students outside Toronto, and four of S250 each, available 
for students from the whole Province, which also carry free tuition in the later years 
on condition that the scholarship holder maintains his first-class honour standing. 
There are also four scholarships of §250 each to be awarded at the end of the first 
vear at the discretion of the Council of University College to students in honour 
courses. 

The Board of Governors set aside out of the general revenue a substantial sum 
to be used as a Bursary Fund in University Collese and in some of the Faculties. By 
reason of this fund, the Alumni Federation Fund, the Students' Administrative 
Council Loan Fund, the Wallberg Memorial Loan Fund for the Faculty of Applied 
Science, and the Loan Funds of the Engineerins Society and the Medical Society, it 
is hoped that no deserving student will be unable to enter or to continue his course 
for lack of financial resources. The Federated Colleges have similar funds for the 
aid of students. Special consideration is given to students whose home is outside 
Toronto, and who must therefore pav the cost of board and lodging in addition to 
tuition fees. In this way an effort is made to equalise as far as possible the educa- 
tional opportunities of city and country. 

There is still need of more and larger scholarships. ^X'hether given annually or 
endowed such scholarships would render a timely service to caoable youths, to the 
University and to the country at large. Our scale of help to brilliant students is 
small in comparison with that adopted in the Mother Country. The Universities 
Grants Committee in Great Britain states in its report for this year, 1936. that fifty 
per cent of the students in the Provincial Universities began their education in the 
public elmentarv schools and that 45.2 per cent of the students received assistance. 
The percentage of assisted students at Oxford and Cambridge is about fifty. Moreover 
in many cases the College scholarships are so supplemented by grants from the 
Countv Councils that the total cost of the students' university education is defrayed. 

Scholarships and other emoluments to the value of at least £1350000 per 
annum are being regularly given to university students, partly by the State and local 
authorities; partlv bv the L^niversities, Colleges and Schools: ?nd partly by public 
trusts. These grants are regarded as good investments which bring in good yield in 
the form of educated humanity. I believe that we ought to increase the scale of our 
awards. 

Manv of our students in this Lniversitv and in Cinadian Lniversities £enerally, 
have to earn somethins by their own efforts either to supplement their scholarships 
or to provide wholly for their expenses. Their vacations are devoted if possible to 
profitable employment. This does make the summer reading party an unthinkable 
enjovment, and doubtless the bloom of fine scholarship may be unattainable. But 
I think that what is lost in scholarship is gained in moral strength, self-reliance, and 
preparation for the struggle of life. Some of our students who win through at the 
price of self-sacrifice and hard work are veritable heroes; thev have gained the 
moral "wrestling thews which throw the world" of obstacles; thev will "make good". 

Proposals have from time to time been made that the Federal Government should 
make grants for scholarships. Such a policy would doubtless justify itself. The 
best channel through which these students aids could be dispensed would be the 
various universities of the Dominion. 

Conclusion 

1. One of the significant features of the present situation is that youth seems 
to have more faith in universities than in most other organised expressions of national 
life. In spite of the limitations and defects of our universities, youth and adults 
alike are turning to them not only to learn how to make a li\ing but to find answers 
to the baffling problems of our generation. Heavy indeed is the responsibility of the 
university and of university teachers in these days. In a singular fashion they have 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 27 

the ear of youth. Thev must recognise that they are "vital agencies of civilisation", 
that they are not agencies of propaganda but agents for the discovery and dissemina- 
tion of truth. The great lesson thev must teach is that fundamentally "the history of 
civilisation is the history of the development of man's ideas and ideals, and the 
advance of humanitv depends on the achievements of the human mind and spirit". 
If youth believes that the universities carry a vital message and in consequence yield 
to them a full measure of trust, the universities in all their members must try to 
prove worthy of that trust. 

2. The importance of the social sciences is increasingly recognised. Human 
relations are after all the factors that make society. Civil people make civilisation. 
Sir Alfred EAving in his presidential address at the British Association of 1932 said: 
"The cornucopia of the engineer has been shaken over all the earth, scattering 
everywhere an endowment of previously unpossessed and unimagined capacities and 
powers . . . manv of these gifts are benefits to man. making life fuller, wider, richer 
in comforts and interests, and in such happiness as material things may promote." 
On the other hand, he goes on to say: "Man is ethically unprepared for so great a 
bountv. . . . The command of nature has been put into his hands before he knows 
how to command himself". A later president of the British Association, the famous 
astronomer, Sir James Jeans added this comment: "The tragedy does not lie in 
man's scientific control over nature but in his absence of moral control over himself". 

There is here no belittling of the place and worth of physical science, but there 
is a demand for something more, something that inheres in man's character and 
determines his relations with his neighbour and his God. 

This year's president of the same great scientific association. Sir Josiah Stamp, 
concluded his address with these words: "The duality which puts science and men's 
other activities in contrasted categories, with disharmony to be resolved, is unreal. 
. . . We have spent much and long upon the science of matter, and the greater our 
success the greater must be our failure, unless we turn also at long last to an equal 
advance in the science of man". 

These utterances illustrate the trend of thinking to-day. The social sciences — 
the investigation of human relationships, the solving of the problem how men may 
live happilv and helpfullv together — will inevitably demand more attention in our 
academic courses of studv. Such emphasis will not mean neglect of the great field 
of physical science: rather is the matter an illustration of the words "this ought ye 
to have done, and not to leave the other undone'. Proper human relations are based 
mainly on intellectual, moral and spiritual factors. It is in ideas and ideals that the 
real wealth of the world consists. To this wealth, not only the scientist, but the 
philosopher, the poet, the moralist and the religious teacher make their contribution. 

3. What does the university seek to do for a student? Its highest function is 
(in the words of the Lniversitv Grants Commission Report I "to train students 
generally, and (without indoctrinating them in anv particular brand of doctrine) in 
some sort of philosophy of life, which will enable them to do their dutv to the 
community and to fulfil their duty in their station faithfully and soberly". Men 
must be trained and stimulated "to think strenuously about the great issues of right 
and wrong, of liberty and government, on which both for the individual and the 
community a balanced judgment is essential to a rational life". 

A graduate, who has gained what his university has tried to give him. has at 
least pn interest in general ideas: he will not accept or reject an idea till he has 
made an effort to understand it: he has been made "capable of philosophy' ; he 
seeks to go down to the root of things; he has learned to understand the meaning of 
things in their universal relations; he has some power to discriminate and to 
appreciate. 

All this personal culture he is taught to believe must issue in service. 

Are there too many educated men and women among us? Can we really have 
loo many men and women possessed of that combination of knowledge and sound 
judgment which it is the chief aim of the university to produce? 



28 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

4. Manv of the most cherished and unquestioned values which the past has 
bequeathed to us are in great areas of the world seriously called in question. Among 
these are the validity of democracy, the right of the individual to freedom of speech 
and opinion, the benefactions of modern civilisation, the reality and possibility of 
progress, the practicability of the highest religious ideals in corporate life, the 
ability of men to build a decent world, to discern truth, to '"save their souls". Are 
these hopelessly obsolete? Or are they worth preserving? Can we in Canada, for 
example, maintain a sane and well-ordered democracy? Can we in our land arouse 
an enthusiasm for it and for our inherited freedom which is in other lands aroused 
for communism and naziism? More than any other form of government does 
democracy rest on the intelligence of the citizen. To the university man, who has 
learned to discipline himself and to think clearly and strenuously, the call comes in 
our land to-day to preserve and to purify our inherited democracy, to make and keep 
it free and ordered and efficient. If democracy fails nationally, it is because it has 
already failed in man's spirit, mind and conscience. Of the man of privilege and 
education is demanded a measure of public interest and public service. If there is a 
flight from reason and responsibility, then is the way prepared for dictatorship. The 
free university will prove one of the chief bulwarks of the splendid heritage of 
political, social and religious freedom which, won at great price, our fathers have 
handed down to us. 

5. A living university has many needs. There is a point below which its income 
cannot sink without seriously impairing its efficiency. I do not think that our 
University can maintain its high standards, if its budget is further reduced, or rather 
unless its revenues are reasonably increased. Individuals may render substantial 
help. There are books to be purchased for special departments in the library; there 
are chairs that might be endowed, such as those in geography or in geophysics or in 
art or in music; there are loan funds and scholarships to be established in different 
faculties; there are postgraduate fellowships to be provided for students from distant 
parts of Canada; there are research funds to be set up in physical science, in social 
science, in engineering, in medicine, in dentistry, and in other fields of investigation. 
Such help if given is an investment yielding an abundant return that continues 
through future ages. 

6. As a university grows in size and numbers its leaders must constantly ask 
themselves the question whether quality is being maintained, whether additions to 
numbers tend to weaken the quality of the institution or the value of the training for 
fife which the university seeks to give or tend to lower the fitness and ability of 
those who enter. "It may seem democratic to diffuse, but it is a poor compliment to 
democracy to run shallow in its name". Meanwhile we do not seem to have reached 
a national saturation point for our students. Canada will surely, even though slowly, 
increase in population, in wealth, and in development of resources. I believe there 
will be suitable opportunities for those who are fitted to take them. 

7. Will the world-order of the future take the form of a soulless and impersonal 
mechanism in which personal values disappear and freedom is only a dead dogma? 
Will anarchv and bloodshed be the end? Or will the spiritual regain the mastery 
and direct that order to a lofty goal? Do we look for defeat or revival? The 
answer to this crucial question rests I believe with the forces of religion and sound 
education. It is with a sense of almost overwhelming responsibility and yet with 
constantly renewed faith and hope that university administrators and teachers face 
their task to-day. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

H. J. Cody. 



President. 



November 26, 1936. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 29 



APPENDIX A 

(1) Report of the Principal of University College. 

(2) Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 

(3) Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering. 

(4) Report of the Dean of the Ontario College of Education. 

( 5 ) Report of the Secretary of the Faculty of Household Science. 
( 6 I Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Forestry. 

( 7 t Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Music. 

( 8 I Report of the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. 

(9) Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Dentistry. 

( 10 ) Report of the Director of the School of Hygiene. 

(Ill Report of the Librarian. 

(12) Report on Research. 

(13) Publications. 

(14) Report of the Director of Lniyersity Extension and Publicity. 
( 15 I Report of the Director of the Department of Social Science. 
(16l Report of the Director of the School of Nursing. 

(17) Report of the Director of the Department of Military Studies. 

(18) Report of Health Services. 

(19) Report of the Warden of Hart House. 

(20 I Report of the Director of the Connaught Laboratories. 

(21) Statement regarding the Museum of Archaeology. 

(22) Statement regarding the Museum of Biology. 

(23) Statement regarding the Museum of Geology. 

(24) Statement regarding the Museum of Mineralogy. 

(25) Statement regarding the Museum of Palaeontology. 



30 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

( 1 ) REPORT OF THE PRLXCIPAL OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 
i Professor M. W. Wallace. M.A., Ph.D.) 

I have the honour to submit mv annual report as Principal of the College. 

I regret that I have to record the death of Professor H. S. McKellar of the 
department of French on April 11th last. He had been seriously ill for more than a 
vear but continued to meet his classes intermittently until within a few months of his 
death. Professor McKellar was one of the most efficient teachers on the college staff. 
After graduating from University College in 1893 he taught for many years in the 
Collegiate Institutes of Owen Sound and London, before his appointment to the 
French staff of the college in 1917. He was untiring in his devotion to the interests 
of his students and of the wider interests of the college, and his death has called 
forth the deepest sympathy of all his colleagues for Mrs. McKellar and his son and 
daughter. 

Professor G. H. Needier has reached the age of retirement and relinquishes his 
position as herd of the department of German. After graduating from University 
College in 1886 Professor Needier spent several years of graduate study in Germany 
from which he returned in 1891 to accept an appointment as lecturer in German in 
his Alma Mater. Few graduate? of the college have had such a long and continuous 
association with its work, and few have been able to render it more distinguished 
service. Apart from his leadership in all matters relating to German studies in 
Ontario. Professor Needier was widely known for his military services in the North- 
\^ est Rebellion of 1885 and as Officer Commanding the Overseas Training Company 
of the I niversitv from 1916 to 1919. No one has given more intelliirent attention to 
the problems of secondarv education in Ontario. He retires with the good-will and 
admiration of a host of friends. 

Mrs. M. M. Kirkwood has resigned ?s assistant professor of English to become 
Principal of St. Hilda s College. For many years Mrs. Kirkwood has taken a major 
part in the life of the college both as Dean of \\ omen and as a member of the 
department of English. In both fields she was eminently successful, and many of 
our women graduates will remember her unfailing kindness and helpfulness as an 
administrator quite as warmly as her power to inspire her students v/ith a love of 
English literature. The whole staff of the college unite in their congratulations to 
Mrs. Kirkwood on her new appointment, and in their regret that once more we have 
been compelled to weaken our own forces in order to supply leadership to a sister 
institution. 

It is a pleasure to record the appointment of Professor Barker Fairley as head 
of the department of German. Professor Fairley is one of the most distinguished 
scholars in the whole field of German studies, and the prospect of his return to 
Universitv College has given great pleasure to all his former colleagues. The Univer- 
sity of Manchester has just conferred upon him the degree of M.A. 

The Governors have finally disposed of the question of free tuition for students 
holding college scholarships by cancelling all free tuition for scholarships won in 
course, but granting free tuition to all holders of matriculation scholarships. In 
other words matriculation scholarships which are worth S12S or more carry free 
tuition for the first year, and thereafter as long as the holder wins first class honours: 
scholarships of smaller value 'SlOO or S75l carry an allowance of SlOO or S75 on 
the cost of tuition in each year. Accordingly we are now able to offer thirty-one 
matriculation scholarships ranging in cash value from S300 down, the great majority 
of which carry complete free tuition. It is a magnificent provision for able students 
entering on a university course who need financial assistance. On the other hand the 
loss of free tuition for scholarships won in course makes it highlv desirable that we 
secure further funds for the encouragement of those students who are of first-rate 
cslibre but who have entered college without matriculation scholarships. Fortunately 
our bursaries allow us to give very substantial assistance to such students. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 31 

During the session the college has received the following gifts: 
(a I From Mr. Frank L. Bastedo ( '09 I of Regina the sum of S500 for the estahlish- 
ment of the Alma Anderson Bastedo Prize in memory of his wife, the prize to be 
awarded to the student who stands first in English in the third year of the Moderns 
course. 

( b I From the Hollywood Theatre a renewal of the prize of S30 in oral French which 
was also given last year. 

( c ) From Dr. D. B. Macdonald, Chairman of the Board of Governors, a framed 
photoirraph of the Lniversitv Commission of 1906. 

;^l From General Fotheringham. a framed photograph of the University College 
class in Classics of 1883. 

(e) From the Women's Undergraduate Association, S60 for the purchase of an urn 
for the Women's Union. 

(/) From Miss Edith Cousins SIO for the purchase of a tray for the Women's Union, 
ig) From Professor G. H. Needier a number of volumes on German literature for 
the Whitnev Hall Library and also for the Women's Lnion Library. 

The Alexander Lectures were delivered bv Professor F. B. Snvder, Professor of 
English and Dean of the Graduate School in Northwestern Lniversitv. The subject 
was Robert Burns — His Personality; His Reputation: His Art. Professor Snyder's 
biography of Burns is the most detailed and scholarlv that has yet appeared, and 
his lectures delighted the large audiences that filled Hart House Theatre. They have 
been published by the University Press and immediately met with a wide-spread 
demand. Next year we expect the lectures to be given by Professor Nicol Smith of 
the University of Oxford. 

The Public Lectures series of the year was opened by a course of four lectures 
on Cartesian Thought given bv our distinguished colleasue. Professor Etienne Gilson 
of the Institute of Mediaeval Studies. Professor Brett followed with two lectures on 
Characteristics of Modem Thought. Then came five lectures analvsing modern ten- 
dencies or trends in social science, economics, international relations, political 
thought and jurisprudence respectively, delivered by Professors Urwick, Bladen, 
Norman Mackenzie. Brady and Auld. The experiment of providing a number of 
afternoon public lectures which graduates and friends of the college are invited to 
attend has become a fixed feature of our academic vear. 

For the third year in succession the college has been honoured by having one of 
its members appointed to a Rhodes Scholarship. The present recipient is Mr. J. E. 
L. Graham who came to us from Saskatchewan, and who has led the course in 
political science in each of his four undergraduate years. Mr. Saul Rae, who has had 
a parallel record in sociology, and who during his fourth year was President of the 
Literary and Athletic Society, has been appointed to the Massey Fellowship. We 
welcome these honours as confirmatory evidence that the college remembers its 
primary function — the development of intellectual capacity in its members. 

(2) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE 
(/. G. FitzGerald, M.D.. LL.D.) 

This communication is a resume of certain of the activities of the Faculty of 
Medicine during the forty-ninth session which closed on June 30th, 1936. It contains 
also reports from eighteen academic departments, an outline of the work of the 
medical art service, notes from the Secretary's Office and accounts of some of the 
extra-curricular student undertakings. 

Certain questions have, during the past two or three years, occupied much time 
of various committees of the faculty. These have included among many others 
discussions of methods of improving the present courses of study; the development of 
a satisfactory and acceptable method of bringing about the limitation of under- 
graduate registration; means whereby bursaries and scholarships for most deserving 



32 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

students may be increased in number and value; what may be done to stimulate and 
increase the interest of students in the libraries of the University; steps which will 
lead (it is hoped) to still further integration of teaching and the lowering of depart- 
mental barriers and greater, all-round emphasis on the teaching of preventive prin- 
ciples and methods in many of the laboratory and clinical departments. The most 
interesting and possibly most promising effort to bring about improvement in teaching 
arrangements and methods has taken place in the department of surgery. With the 
reorganisation of the surgical services at the Toronto Western Hospital, the appoint- 
ment of Dr. T. A. J. Duff as surgeon-in-chief as well as six other surgeons (four of 
whom have already held university appointments I , plans have now been completed 
there to provide for clinical teaching in surgery for sixth, fifth and fourth year 
students. This is a most satisfactory conclusion reached after much effort. These 
additional facilities, too, obviate the necessity of assigning certain sixth year groups 
to the Hospital for Sick Children, an arrangement never regarded as satisfactory 
because it meant that such students were not afforded suitable opportunities for the 
study of surgical conditions occurring in adults. Clinical instruction for all fifth 
year students will, however, be given at the Hospital for Sick Children. 

In the departments of surgery and obstetrics and gynaecology dissatisfaction 
with existing opportunities for clinical teaching has led. this year, to determined 
efforts designed to improve matters. In surgery the students have been assigned 
regular hospital duties under interne direction. The experiment, however, has been 
only partiallv successful owing to existing lecture schedules. To ascertain, if 
possible, whether a limited amount of summer clinical teaching in surgery for a 
group of twelve students could be given satisfactorily, an experiment is being made 
during the months of June, July and August, 1936. Three students have been attached 
to each surgical division at the Toronto General Hospital and one to a similar division 
at St. MichaeTs Hospital. The opportunities for much more satisfactory preparation 
of the students in surgery appear to exist and much is hoped for from this effort. At 
the end of the three months period these twelve students who have volunteered and 
been admitted to the course will be given a clinical examination in surgery. If 
successful they will not be required to undergo a further clinical test in the subject 
at the close of the sixth year. A similar experiment is to be made by the department 
of obstetrics and gynaecology with a view to improving the clinical instruction in 
obstetrics. This is exceedingly important because of the place this subject should 
occupy in the medical curriculum. 

A proposal emanating from the department of surgery looking to the extension 
of the final year from thirty to forty-eight weeks has been discussed in a preliminary 
fashion in the Committee on Curriculum and Examinations and is likely to receive 
further study and consideration. There is little doubt that the present break between 
fifth and sixth years when students should be (and many are, in an unorganised 
fashion) deeply engrossed in clinical studies, might well be superseded by some 
more suitable arrangement. 

The unfortunate overcrowding, resulting from the admission of too large a 
number of undergraduates in the first year, continues. The observations made by 
two of my colleagues in reference to this question may be cited. Professor W. E. 
Gallic writes: "Each year I bring to your attention the calamitous effect of the con- 
stantly increasing numbers of our students on the quality of our teaching. I have 
no thought that it is the function of the Medical School to attempt to teach the art of 
surgery to undergraduate students, but it is becoming increasingly difficult, owing to 
the numbers, to teach them the bare essentials that are necessary for general practice. 
Besides interfering with the quality of our clinical teaching, the number of students 
is creating a nuisance in the hospitals. . . . We simply must find a way to limit the 
number of students coming into the clinical years". With that view I am in complete 
and entire agreement. 

It might not be so serious if our students were of such quality that medical 
science and the community would likely suffer were some of them not afforded a 



UMVERSITY OF TOROxNTO FOR 1936 33 

medical education ( at least in this University ) • To allay any apprehension which 
might arise on those grounds I may quote from the report of one other colleague, 
Professor J. C. B. Grant, who states: "Our best students are excellent; our poorest 
students are numerous and extremely poor". The number of those who every session 
are "repeating" confirms this observation. The situation is one which should be 
remedied and in this report I desire once again to maJve a plea for limitation in the 
number of students admitted to classes in this faculty. 

Attention was last year directed to the commendable action of the undergraduate 
Medical Society in again donating the surplus on operations of the society to the 
Board of Governors to provide modest bursaries for worthy students in need of 
financial assistance. The Medical Society contribution to which was added a sum 
provided by the Board of Governors, made possible the award of thirty-seven bur- 
saries in all. These ranged in value from fifty to one hundred dollars. This most 
admirable arrangement is unique in this University and those undergraduates in 
medicine who are responsible are to be congratulated upon the wisdom they have 
shown in this connection. The thanks and appreciation of the Facultv are hereby 
tendered to the Medical Society. 

Bursaries and scholarships and suitable criteria for admission to this faculty 
may some day mean that no boy or girl in this province who is a Vtorthy candidate 
for a place in the profession of medicine will be denied admission or be unable to 
proceed with medical studies for economic reasons. State scholarships as well as 
those founded by private benefactors would hasten the arrival of that day. From 
the standpoint of the community as well as that of the profession it is a consum- 
mation devoutly to be desired. 

The teaching of preventive medicine is not the responsibilitv of any single 
department in this faculty. Those which contribute largely to the present plan of 
instruction include: Hygiene and preventive medicine, medicine, paediatrics, psychi- 
atry, obstetrics, physiology. Then too, the departments of the School of Hygiene and 
Connaught Laboratories also participate in the preparation of the undergraduate in 
public health and preventive medicine. While further progress can still be made it 
is not too much to claim that in this University the medical student has almost 
unique opportunities for becoming acquainted with the principles and methods of 
preventive medicine and with the opportunities which exist for the practice of pre- 
ventive as well as of curative medicine. This year, as well, students in the fifth year 
during their field course have learned something of the social resources of the 
community. For this we are indebted to Miss Margaret Gould of the Child Welfare 
Council and to Miss Frieda Held, M.A., Assistant Deputy Minister of Labor. 

This faculty in October had the pleasure of entertaining those who attended the 
annual meeting of the Association of American Medical Colleges. This was the first 
occasion upon which the Association has met in Toronto. Interesting and valuable 
discussions of various topics combined with the opportunity afforded of informal 
discussions of teaching problems between sessions and the social intercourse rendered 
possible by the assembly of representatives of eighty universities in the United States 
and Canada made the occasion altogether noteworthy. It was a source of great 
pleasure and gratification to his colleagues in this faculty when Dr. E. Stanley 
Ryerson, assistant dean and secretary, was named president-elect of the association 
for the next year. 

In November 1935 representatives of the Council on Medical Education and 
Hospitals of the American Medical Association and of the Association of American 
Medical Colleges visited departments of the Faculty of Medicine and the teaching 
hospitals. This was really a survey of the present facilities and organisation of this 
faculty PS a part of a study of medical education in all so-called "Grade A" schools 
in the United States and Canada. The reports of this enquiry will be compiled and 
arranged by Dr. H. G. Weiskotten, Dean of the School of Medicine of Syracuse 
University, who has served as director of the study. Dr. Ryerson assisted in the 
survey of a number of medical schools both in Canada and the United States. Such 



34 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

periodical enquiries into the existing status of medical education, the scrutiny of 
methods of instruction and the organisation of courses of study, glimpses of the 
physical plant asd equipment, and finally, careful consideration of the resources of 
each school in research and teaching personnel, undoubtedly serve many useful 
purposes. Complacency and satisfaction with present accomplishments are more 
than likely to be disturbed by visits from colleagues whose business it is to point out 
our shortcomings and inadequacies both in plans and methods. 

In 1935 the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario ceased to conduct 
examinations. The certificate of the Medical Council of Canada indicating that the 
candidate for registration has passed the examinations conducted by the Council is 
now accepted by the College as completing its renuirements. Reference to this 
forward step has already been made. This year the College has raised the entrance 
requirements for resistration as a medical student to conform to those of the univer- 
sities in Ontario. Now remains the development and adoption of a plan acceptable 
to the Council, the College and the universities in this province whereby university 
degree and certificate and licensure may be obtained by passing one not two sets of 
examinations. 

The undergraduate Medical Society has for many years past published a very 
creditable "Medical Journal". The editorial direction and business management are 
entirely in the hands of members of the Society. A member of the Faculty of Medicine 
serves in an advisory capacity to the editorial board. Thus far subscription to the 
Journal has been voluntary upon the part of medical undergraduates. This year the 
Society, having revised its constitution with the overwhelming approval of members 
of the Society, the Facultv of Medicine and the Board of Governors, gave approval 
to new constitution. This provides for an increase in the membership fee from 
tnree to four dollars. This fee will cover free subscription to the "Medical Journal" 
in addition to other privileges of membership heretofore enjoyed. It is anticipated 
that in future years any surplus on operation of the Society will be contributed to 
the Bursary Fund to which reference has already been made. 

This session, Lister Day fell on Sunday and in consequence the ninth Donald C. 
Balfour Lecture in Surgery was delivered on Monday, April 6th. Tlie lecturer was 
Dr. Melvin S. Henderson of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. The title of the 
address was "Orthopaedic Surgery, an Historical Review". Dr. D. E. Robertson, a 
classmate of Dr. Henderson, moved the vote of thanks, upon conclusion of an inter- 
esting address. A few days thereafter Dr. Robertson was one of the victims of a 
mine cave-in and for ten davs his colleagues shared with his relatives and literally 
thousands of friends and well-wishers not only in North America but in all parts of 
the world the gravest anxiety as to his survival. To the profound thankfulness and 
gratification of all. Dr. Robertson's life was spared and his colleagues rejoice that 
he has been enabled to continue the splendid service he has for long years rendered 
to mankind and very especially to crippled children. 

His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor once again placed the Faculty of Medicine 
under a debt of gratitude bv graciously entertaining for the Donald C. Balfour 
lecturer, the President of the University, a number of members of the Senate, heads 
of departments and others. His Honour ?lso attended the I ister Day celebration. 

Very successful post-graduate courses have been given during the scission. Those 
provided by the departments of surgery and paediatrics were conspicuouslv successful 
and largely attended. In the past year members of the Faculty of Medicine to the 
number of sixty have participated in the extra-mural post-sraduate medical meetings 
held under the auspices of the Ontario Medical Association. One hundred and sixty 
lectures in all were given. It is perhaps not generally realised tb« extent to which 
members of this faculty participate in such post-graduate work. The task of main- 
taining a high level of professional competence among members of the medical 
profession in the constituency served by this LIniversity is fully appreciated. 

The Charles Mickle Fellowship, "awarded fnnually to that member of the 
medical profession who is considered by the Faculty of Medicine to have done most 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 35 

during the preceding ten years to advance sound knowledge of a practical kind in 
medical art or science", has this year been given to Dr. Donald D. VanSlyke of the 
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research for his work on methods of blood 
analysis and gasometric microanalysis, also for his work on respiratory and renal 
functions, on diabetes and nephritis, and in general, for his investigations in the 
field of quantitative clinical chemistry. The Ellen Mickle Fellowship has been 
awarded to Omand M. Solandt. M.A., B.Sc. (Med. ). Dr. Solandt further distinguished 
himself by winning the Faculty Gold Medal, the Chappell Prize in Clinical Medicine, 
the William John Hendry Memorial Scholarship in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, the 
Ontario Medical Association Prize in Preventive Medicine, the Canadian Medical 
Institute Prize and the David Dunlap Memorial Scholarship in Psychology. A 
notable record. 

The John Copp Bursary to which brief reference has previously been made v/as 
established in memory of the late John Copp. The purpose of the bursary is the 
advancement of medical education in the University of Toronto. The income from 
the trust is awarded to the student in this University who is eligible for admission to 
the fourth year. The award is made upon the recommendation of a committee which 
takes into account, in making a recommendation, the character, athletic ability, 
scholarship and general interests of those nominated, so that "the holder of the 
bursary should possess those qualities and attain a high standard in each, but in no 
one to the exclusion of the others; the holder to have qualities and attainments as 
much like the late John Copp as possible". It is further stipulated that while the 
recipient of the bursary must be a good student it is clearly understood that the 
other characteristics mentioned above as well as scholastic attainment must be pos- 
sessed by the person recommended for the award. The nominee in 1935 was Mr. 
M. F. Williams, president of the fourth year class, and in June 1936, Mr. C. Cameron 
Gray was awarded this bursary. Two very worthy recipients. 

To Dr. E. Stanley Ryerson has come election to the office of President of the 
Association of American Medical Colleges. Dr. H. C. Parsons has been made a 
Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of London. A similar honour has come to 
Sir Frederick Banting. Dr. K. G. McKenzie has been elected President of the Harvey 
Gushing Society. Dr. M. M. Crawford has been appointed physician to the Canadian 
Olympic team to visit Berlin in August 1936. The Dean of the Faculty was 
reappointed a Scientific Director of the International Health Division of the Rocke- 
feller Foundation for a three-year period. He has also been made a member of the 
Permanent Commission on Biological Standardisation of the Health Organisation of 
the League of Nations. The Rockefeller Foundation has invited him. also, to under- 
take for a period of one year from the middle of September 1935 a study of the 
methods at present employed in the teaching of preventive medicine in medical 
schools in the United States, Canada, the British Isles and Europe. 

Sir Frederick Banting. Professor C. H. Best, Dr. W. R. Campbell. Dr. E. T. 
Waters, among others, attended sessions of the International Physiological Congress 
in Leningrad in August 1935. Professor Best spent the month of February as guest 
lecturer in Physiology at Yale University. The Morris Herzstein Lectures at Stanford 
University Medical School were delivered in San Francisco in March by the Dean of 
the Facultv. Dr. E. S. Ryerson attended the meetings of the Congress on Medical 
Education held in Chicago in March, and Dr. J. H. Elliott attended the Tenth Inter- 
national Congress on the History of Medicine in Madrid and Toledo in the autumn 
of last year. Dr. D. T. Eraser delivered a DeLamar Lecture at the School of Public 
Health. Johns Hopkins Lniversity, in April 1936. 

The members of the Faculty of Medicine deeply regret the loss by death during 
the year of Dean F. B. Allan, for many years a most valuable and helpful colleague 
held in the highest esteem by all. They most deeply mourn also the loss of a former 
colleague and friend. Sir John McLennan, for many years a highly valued member 
of this faculty. The death of Dr. Graham Chambers, for a lengthy period a clinical 
teacher in the department of medicine, is sincerely regretted. The passing of Dean 



36 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Seccombe of the sister Faculty of Dentistry during this session was the occasion of 
sorrow to his colleagues in this faculty. The death of Professor I. V. Pavlov, world 
famous physiologist and Charles Mickle Fellow in 1921, is here recorded with regret. 
Dr. F. A. Clarkson retires this year as assistant professor of medicine. He carries 
with him into retirement the thanks and best wishes of the Faculty of Medicine. Dr. 
C. B. Weld has resigned his appointment as assistant professor of physiology upon 
his appointment to the chair of physiology in Dalhousie University. Dr. Weld has 
been a valued member of this University for several years past and sincere thanks 
for splendid service and every good wish for success in his new field are hereby 
extended to him. Dr. James Wood has resigned as demonstrator in surgery. Dr. 
J. C. Calhoun and Dr. M. B. Whyte as senior and junior demonstrator respectively 
in oto-laryngology. To all three gentlemen it is desired to express warm thanks for 
the services which they have given to the University. Dr. J. G. FitzGerald has 
resigned as Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, and Dr. W. E. Gallic has been appointed 
bv the Board of Governors to serve as Dean for a three-vear period from July first 
1936. 



(3) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE AND 

ENGINEERING 

{C. II. Mitchell. CB., C.M.G., C.E.. D.Eng.) 

Again a most satisfactory report can be made with regard to the academic work 
in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering. The session 1935-36 may be 
regarded as a highly successful year, both in the undergraduate and graduate portions 
of the faculty work, as well as in the research achievements carried out by the School 
of Engineering Research. 

The standard of work in the various departments of the Faculty, as performed 
by both staff and students, has been of a high order. It is observable that the marked 
application, interest and painstaking attention to their work by the members of the 
staff of all grades, has inspired a conspicuous reaction on the part of the students. 
Such a result is highly gratifying and is especially commendable in academic work in 
the realm of applied science education. One factor contributing to this is the manner 
in which members of the staff keep in touch with engineering projects both directly 
by their own professional activities and indirectly by keeping themselves informed of 
engineering progress in its ever changing features and applications. 

The students on their part have continued to take a serious and earnest interest 
in their academic work while, at the same time, engaging in the many university and 
outside professional activities for which the students of this faculty are notable. This 
combined interest, encouraged as it is by the staff, has a most desirable effect in 
binding more closely staff, students, graduates, and the profession generally. Where, 
as in this case, a profession bears a direct relation to the material progress and 
development of the country, such co-operation is greatly to be desired and enables a 
university, with its alumni, to exert considerable direction and no small influence in 
the upbuilding of a young country like Canada. 

The continued attendance of students in large numbers in this faculty demands 
renewed attention. As each year goes by in this recent cycle of depression and 
recovery, it is quite evident, if attendance at an engineering faculty in this country 
can be, as it is, a barometer of conditions, that the thinking people believe Canada is 
approaching a fresh advance in its development. In this I personally believe, because 
ail the signs of reaction from the depression point that way. The reasons are more 
definitely apparent as we go through our annual stocktaking at each new year. For 
these same reasons I believe Canada will still continue to require engineers and 
applied scientists in large numbers for some years to come and even in increasing 
numbers. For these reasons, too, I am of opinion that the in-flow of students pre- 
paring themselves for such a key profession should not be discouraged. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 37 

It is of interest in these respects to observe the varying numbers of students in 
attendance in Applied Science in this University during the past fourteen years. It 
is of especial interest to note that in the past six years the attendance, while having 
reached a peak in 1932-33 and having naturally somewhat fallen off during the 
depression, still continues at a high figure, greater than during the first eight years of 
the fourteen year period, the slight decline in the past three years being quite out of 
line with what might have been expected during the severe depression we have just 
passed through. Further, it should be observed that the increasing numbers of the 
incoming first years has become quite marked the past two years. All this significantly 
indicates the estimate which the people of Ontario and Canada generally make of the 
engineering prospects of the country in having their sons obtain an applied science 
education. To illustrate the foregoing observations, the following table of attendances 
will be of interest: 

Attendance in Faculty of Applied Science 



I 

1922-23 139 

1923-24 125 

1924-25 116 

1925-26 126 

1926-27 163 

1927-28 192 

1928-29 204 

1929-30 276 

1930-31 329 

1931-32 281 

1932-33 265 

1933-34 226 

1934-35 221 

1935-36 248 

The foregoing table, however, indicates only the general situation with respect 
to the total numbers in the faculty year by year. An analysis of the figures by 
departments in the general fields of engineering, presents quite a different picture. 
The varying numbers in the fields of civil, mechanical, electrical, mining, metal- 
lurgical, and chemical engineering, and architecture, give considerable food for 
thought. I have, at various times the past few years, drawn attention to these, more 
especially pointing out the wide swings by which, either by popularity, fashion or 
considered judgment, incoming students have refrained from entering some depart- 
ments and have crowded into others. Examples of these, at the present time, at 
opposite ends of the scale, are those of civil engineering and chemical engineering. 

In recent years the number of students entering civil engineering has notably 
decreased, although there is now discernible a definite swing upwards. The down- 
ward swing has continued too long and despite the view oftentimes expressed the past 
five or six years, that this branch has a restricted future, the cumulative effect is 
apparent that we have been educating too few civil engineers. This cannot quickly 
right itself, although it is now slowly doing so. It is quite evident that, with returning 
prosperity and construction activity, we will be faced in this country with a shortage 
of young civil engineers in the course of the next three or four years. 

On the other hand, the situation in the field of chemical engineering is the 
reverse. We have observed a rapidly increasing number of students entering this 
branch of the profession. The swing, moreover, seems to be continuing as evidenced 
by the increasing numbers of students entering the first year the past few years. Up 
to a certain point this increase should not have been discouraged as the country can 
now absorb a great many more chemically trained graduates for its varied industries 
than it could, say ten years ago. That the reasonable proportion has now been 
passed, is indicated by the numbers recently in the first year of this department, 











Total 




Years 






Attendance 


II 


III 


IV 


V 




167 


182 


265 


- 


743 


127 


150 


165 


— 


567 


121 


113 


138 


— 


488 


107 


119 


93 


- 


445 


110 


110 


104 


— 


487 


149 


109 


100 


— 


550 


165 


131 


100 


— 


600 


158 


150 


117 


- 


701 


231 


151 


139 


— 


850 


286 


175 


139 


- 


881 


250 


236 


157 


6 


914 


238 


203 


207 


9 


883 


189 


198 


179 


8 


795 


175 


160 


176 


7 


766 



38 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

viz. :— 68 in 1932, 80 in 1933, 81 in 1934, and 82 in 1935, because these have com- 
posed 24%, 30%, 36%, and 37% of the total number of students in the first years of 
those respective sessions. 

The disturbing feature of this rapidly increasing registration in chemical 
engineering, so far as our instructional capabilities are concerned, lies in the inade- 
quate facilities at our disposal in both accommodation and equipment for efficiently 
providing for such large numbers of students in this department. In this regard I 
can only repeat the plea I have continuously put forward the past six years or more, 
urging greatly needed increased accommodation necessary for even a portion of those 
now seeking an education in chemical engineering. Even if the present large numbers 
were decreased by thirty per cent, we would still be quite inadequately served by our 
present facilities. 

A notable feature of the past session has been the observance of the fiftieth 
anniversary of the founding of the Engineering Society, the students' organisation in 
this faculty. This Society was primarily founded to form an adjunct to the academic 
work of the faculty in the early days when it was the School of Practical Science. 
This object has carefully been kept in mind as the faculty has continued to encourage 
the Society in its functions of presenting to the student body papers and addresses by 
prominent engineers and others, directing student activities and representing the 
faculty as a whole in general university affairs. The students are again to be con- 
gratulated on the excellent manner they have carried these out and especially on the 
successful anniversary and reunion they brought about, thus enlisting the interest and 
attention of the graduates and binding them more closely to the University and its 
general interests. 

Although again provided with but a very small appropriation, the School of 
Engineering Research has carried on through the year with those researches which 
were considered to be most urgent. Some of these were continuations of ones 
previously undertaken and several v/ere new ones in fields and on subjects which are 
pressing for consideration. The difficult problem in laying down a research pro- 
gramme at this time, is to decide what are the most urgent subjects for research 
having regard to the financial stringency. The members of the staff of the faculty 
are to be complimented upon the attention and the interest they have given to pressing 
researches under these conditions, when funds for assistance and necessary equipment 
are so limited. A full report of the subjects and objects of research and the progress 
that has been made during the session, is being forwarded by the Committee of 
Management of the School of Engineering Research. 

It is with very much regret we have to face the retirement of Professor T. R. 
Rosebrugh, professor of electrical engineering and head of the department. On 
reaching the retiring age limit, we realise Professor Rosebrugh has been a member of 
this staff for forty-seven years and his valuable and diligent service in his instructional 
work, his sound administrati\e ability, his thorough scholarship and his unending 
help to the graduates and the profession will long be remembered. 

(4) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

iDr. J. G. Althouse) 

The registration of the session 1935-36 was lower than that of 1934-35. Inclusive 
of the extramural students, the total number registered in the courses for teachers was 
774 as against 930 in 1934-35. The most marked decrease is seen in the High School 
Assistants' course. It is interesting to note that the proportion of those seeking 
specialist standing has increased. 

Some noteworthy changes have occurred in the work of the College. Continuous 
practice-teaching was introduced in the second term of the session. Professor Griffith 
Taylor inaugurated a special course of lectures in cultural geography. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 39 

The registration in the librarians' course was 55 and the demand for trained 
librarians for the public and special libraries of Ontario was relatively satisfactory. 
The Senate of the L niversity has met the demand for the recognition of the courses 
offered by the Library School by establishing a course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Library Science. This course will be offered for the first time in 1936-37. 
The diploma course for those entering the Library School without previous graduation 
from a recognised Lniversity will be continued. 

Dr. Sandiford. director of the department of educational research, was absent on 
leave at Stanford L niversity from January 1st. and Dr. J. A. Long was acting director. 
Dr. W. Line of the department of psychology of the Lniversity assisted in the course 
in science of education in the College of Education. During the session, the depart- 
ment of educational research published two bulletins, completed the studv of the 
financial support of the schools of the pro\dnce, and began the studv of the prognostic 
value of the marks in practice-teaching obtained by the teachers-in-training. This 
study has been undertaken through the generosity of the Carnegie Corporation, which 
has approved the application for this purpose of the balance of the grant originally 
made for language study. Dr. M. A. Cameron, assistant professor of educational 
research, will conduct the study. 

Dr. Michael ^\est. professor in the department of educational research, who was 
on leave fqx the 1934-35 session, resigned in order to undertake an investigation in 
basic English for the Carnegie Corporation. 



(5) REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE FACULTY OF HOUSEHOLD 

SCIENCE 

(Professor C. C. Benson. Ph.D.) 

Satisfactory progress has been made during the vear. with a slight increase in 
registration from 45 to 53 for total registration in all vears. This is chiefly due to 
the larger number of students who have come to us from Macdonald Institute. There 
have been 23 of these students with us this vear. three in the fourth year, eight in the 
third year of the specialist course, and twelve in the pass course of that year, and in 
general their work has been satisfactorv. 

Like some others of Macdonald students of recent years, several of them have, 
however, experienced difficulty with the courses in chemistrv. and a meeting was held 
during the year when means of lessening this difficultv were discussed. Dr. Christie, 
with three of the staff from Guelph, Ccime here for this meeting; certain adjustments 
are already being made, and it is planned to hold similar meetings in the future, with 
the hope of properly fitting courses at Guelph and those given here. 

There have been several changes of staff in the Facultv. Miss Charlotte Valen- 
tine. M.A.. assistant professor of household science, retired last spring to be married, 
and Miss Edna Park, M.A., was promoted to the assistant professorship, with Miss 
Jessie Roberts, M.A.. M.Sc. coming to us as lecturer in household science to carry on 
Professor Valentine's soecial work. 

The most serious change, however, is the retirement of Professor Laird, who is 
resigning from the direction of the department of household science after twenty-five 
years of whole-hearted and faithful service. During this time she has established a 
strong department, and has had a large share in training graduates who are now 
doing good work as dietitians, teachers of household science, or as heads of their own 
households. The loyal affection of the graduates in household science — from this 
Faculty and from the department of household economics in the Faculty of Arts — was 
shown in their gift of her portrait to the University, and well expressed at the large 
gathering of these graduates who met to do honour to her at the time of the 
presentation. 



40 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

(6) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF FORESTRY 

{Dr. C. D. Hoive) 

The enrolment in the Faculty of Forestry continues to decrease. This year, 
thirty-seven students were in attendance compared with fifty-two in the previous year. 
The entrance class of this year was not large enough to overcome the diminution 
caused by the removal of twenty-two students in the graduating class of '35, the 
largest graduating class in the history of the Faculty. The reduction in attendance is 
undoubtedly due to political and economic causes. The displacing of trained men 
in the administration of the fire protection staff and the complete cessation of forest 
investigative work in Ontario close for the time being one half the field of employ- 
ment for our graduates. The plea that this has been done on the basis of economy 
is quite plausible but in the long run it will cost the people of the province much 
more than will be saved. The use of untrained men and the reversion to primitive 
methods in fire protection may seem apparently justified in wet seasons but will lay 
the countrv open to widespread destruction of life and property in the extremely dry 
seasons which occur periodically. The abandonment of forest research work means 
delay in the development of measures eventually to place our forests on a continuous 
production basis and thus places in jeopardy the future prosperity of wood-using 
industries. 

The two principal fields of employment now left open to our men are the pulp 
and paper industry and the Dominion Forest Service. The former took seven of the 
fourteen of this year's graduates and the latter three. One went to the Dominion 
Entomological Branch and one to the wood using department of an agricultural 
implement manufactory. Thus eighty-five per cent of the graduates have found 
employment and practically all of them were asured positions before they were 
actually graduated. This latter is something that has not happened since the depres- 
sion began. The three following classes will probably average not more than eight 
at the time of graduation, so even if the conditions of employment are no better in 
the immediately following years, we will not have enough men to meet the demand. 
As soon as this fact is publicly known our enrolment will undoubtedly increase. 

Since it is probable that most of our men will go to private industries for the 
next few years at least, we have rearranged our practice camp so as to give the 
students a more intensive training in woods work. Instead of six weeks at the 
beginning of the fourth year the practice camp work hereafter will be given for three 
weeks at the end of the first, second, and third years. The site of t^e camp has been 
transferred from Algonquin Park to a more accessible area in Haliburton county. It 
also has a greater variety of forest conditions. The area is being carefully studied 
and surveyed from the standpoint of a permanent location. 

(7) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF MUSIC 
{Sir Ernest MacMillan) 

During the session 1935-1936 the number of students registered was 40, in the 
course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music; 10 registered in the first year, 16 
in the second vear and 14 in the third year. The degree of Bachelor of Music was 
conferred on four, and the degree of Doctor of Music on three candidates. 

The usual series of lectures have been given by members of the Faculty, and 9 
students have been registered for special tutorial classes. 

Six organ recitals were given during the season in Convocation Hall, arranged 
by Dr. Healey Willan, four of which programmes were played by Dr. Willan, and 
the other two by Mr. D'Alton McLaughlin and Mr. Frederick Silvester respectively. 
At the second of these organ recitals Dr. Willan was assisted by Mr. George Lambert 
(baritone ) and the choir of the Church of St. Mary Magdelene. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 41 

The Conservatory Choir has appeared twice in Convocation Hall in performances 
of Handel's "Messiah" and Bach's "Saint Matthew Passion" on February 29th and 
April 7th respectively, and has also sung Brahms' "Requiem" and Beethoven's "Choral 
Symphony" in Massey Hall with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. The Conservatory 
Orchestra, under the direction of Mr. Ettore Mazzoleni, gave a concert in Convocation 
Hall in January and appeared twice in Massey Hall during the spring. Other 
Conservatory organisations, notably the Conservatory String Quartet, have made 
valuable contributions to the musical season in Toronto. 

The musical activities of Hart House have continued to hold the interest of 
the students. The progress made during the last season by the Hart House Glee 
Club under Mr. (now Dr. » Charles Peaker has been noteworthy. A valuable 
contribution to the musical life of the University has been made by the Hart House 
String Quartet in its special series of students' concerts in Convocation Hall. The 
Carillon recitals given in the Memorial Tower by Mr. J. L. Richardson are as always 
a popular feature of the musical life of the University. 

The Toronto Conservatory of Music celebrates this year the fiftieth anniversarv 
of its incorporation, although it was not actually opened until 1887. The first 
function connected with this event took the form of a Jubilee Reunion in March under 
the auspices of the Conservatory Alumni Association. This was followed by a 
Jubilee Concert in Massey Hall on April 27th and additional functions have been 
arranged for the autumn. Historical data regarding the Conservatory has been 
collected by Dr. Horwood who has also prepared a short historical record which 
appears in the Year Book for 1936-37. 

The Conservatory will greatly miss the active help of Miss Marion Ferguson, 
who has been registrar since its foundation, and who is retiring this year. Miss 
Ferguson has devoted her life to the building up of the institution; her quiet 
efficiency, kindliness and tact have made for her thousands of friends throughout 
Canada. 

The vice-principal, Dr. Healey Willan, after an unbroken record of twenty- 
three years' service with the Conservatory, is being given a year's leave of absence, 
and will devote himself chiefly to composition. Mr. Norman Wilks will fill the 
office of executive assistant to the principal, and minor re-adjustments will be made 
in the administrative staff. 

The Conservatory has been fortunate in securing the active co-operation of so 
many outstanding men to serve on its board. Last autumn. Colonel F. H. Deacon 
consented to accept the post of chairman, left vacant through the death of Sir Albert 
Gooderham. and with Mr. Floyd Chalmers as vice-chairman, heads a board whose 
courageous handling of the many problems which arise, promises to bear excellent 
fruit in the years to come. The untimely death of Mr. W. R. P. Parker removed 
from the Board one of its new members who, had he lived, would have doubtless 
proved a great source of strength to the institution. 

The number of candidates entering for the examinations of the Toronto Con- 
servatory of Music for the present season has been 14,109 — as compared with 13,660 
for the season 1934-35. 

A proposal introduced into the Senate in March, to create a new honour Arts 
Course with music as one of the principal subjects, will be considered at length in 
the early autumn, and it is to be hoped that it will be established by the time the 
calendar for 1937-38 is issued. The claims of music to a prominent place in all 
educational schemes were never more fully recognised than they are to-day, and public 
interest is awake to the importance of the questions involved. 



42 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

(8) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

{Professor G. S. Brett) 

The number of students registered in the School of Graduate Studies for the 
year 1935-6 was 613. The number for the previous year was 614. Apparently the 
decrease noted in the report for 1934-5, which amounted to 100 or approximately 14 
per cent, has not continued. The total enrolment for this year is practically identical 
with that of the previous year and the enrolment for the different degrees shows only 
minor fluctuations: the number of men enrolled as candidates for the M.A. increased 
by 16, the number of women candidates decreased by 18: the number of men 
candidates for D.Paed. increased by 15, the number of Women remaining unchanged: 
candidates for M.S.A. decreased from 13 to 4: for the other degrees the numbers 
varied very little. The total number of men increased from 438 to 452; the number 
of women decreased from 176 to 161. 

The number of students resident in the Province of Ontario was 437, a decrease 
of 28; the number from Toronto was 257 (a decrease of 12) ; from the other parts 
of the Province 180 (a decrease of 16). (For details see p. 162.) The number of 
students from other Provinces of Canada was as follows: — Nova Scotia 21, New 
Brunswick 20, Prince Edward Island 4, Quebec 5, Manitoba 20, Saskatchewan 27, 
Alberta 11, British Columbia 16. These figures show no signicant deviation from 
the previous year with the exception of the number from Saskatchewan which rose 
from 17 to 27. The number from other countries rose from 48 to 52, being composed 
as follows: 29 from the United States, 6 from England, 3 from India. 1 from 
Denmark. 2 from Japan, 3 from China, 1 from Germany, 1 from Ireland, 3 from 
British West Indies, 1 from Switzerland. 

The number of institutions represented was 49. Out of the total number 
registered 176 held staff appointments (an increase of 11) ; 352 took their first degree 
at Toronto, 40 at Queen's. 39 at McMaster, 25 at Western Ontario. 

The distribution of the candidates for the different degrees was as follows :^ — 

Ph.D 143 

M.A 156 

M.S 2 

M.A.Sc 11 

C.E 2 

E,E 2 

D.Paed. 100 

M.Sc.F 2 

M.Sc.(Dent.) 3 

Mus. Doc 3 

M.S.A 4 

The distribution of the candidates according to their major subject was as 
follows: — Anatomy 1, applied mathematics 5, anthropology 3. astronomy 2, bio- 
chemistry 12, biology 24, botany 17, chemistry 41, chemical engineering 7, civil 
engineering 4, classics 23. dentistry 3, educational theory 3, English 62, epidemiology 
and biometrics 2, food chemistry 7, forestry 2, geology and palaeontology 9, Germanic 
languages and literature 10, history 27, household science 7, hygiene and preventive 
medicine 1, law 9, mathematics 12, mechanical engineering 3, mineralogy 5, mining 
engineering 3, music 3. pathology and bacteriology 7, pathological chemistry 5, 
pedaeogv 100, philosophy 51. phvsics 29, physiology 14, physiological hygiene 1, 
political science 18. professional degrees 4, psychiatry 2, psychology 43. romance 
languages 16, Semitic languages 9, surgery 2. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 43 

The number of students recommended for degrees this year was as follows: — 

Ph.D 36 

M.A , 84 

M.S 1 

M.A.Sc 11 

C.E 2 

E.E 1 

M.Sc.F 2 

Mus. Doc 3 

D.Paed 2 

M.Sc.(Dent.) 2 

M.S.A 1 

Fellowships: — The Open Fellowships which are awarded by the Council of the 
School have for some years been four in number: two of these were given for a 
stated period of time: as one lapsed and the other was not definitely renewed before 
the end of the session, the Council made only two definite awards. These awards were 
made as follows: — 

G. J. Kane, B.A., British Columbia; department of English. 

M. D. Darrach, M.A. British Columbia; department of biochemistry. 

Appointments to other fellowships made by the Council of the School were: — 
Alexander Mackenzie fellowships: — 
G. F. Butler, M.A. Dalhousie; department of history. 
A. Stewart, B.A. Western Ontario; department of political science. 
Ramsay Wright Scholarship: — 
W. B. Stallworthy, B.A. Toronto. 
McLennan award: — 
K. C. Mann, B.Sc. Saskatchewan, M.A. 

Fellowships tenable in the School of Graduate Studies were awarded as follows: — 
War Memorial Fellowships: — 
William B. Spears, B.A. Western Ontario. 
S. A. Jennings, B.A. 
Maurice Cody Fellowship: — 
H. D. Woods, M.A. McGill. 
Leonard Fellowship : — 
C. T. Bissell, B.A. 

The following members of the School of Graduate Studies obtained scholarships or 
fellowships for advanced study in other institutions: — 

Roval Society Fellowships: — 

H. N. Frve, B.A. 

T. A. Goudge, M.A. 

1851 Exhibition:— 

A. D. Misener, M.A. 

S. L. Cohen, B.A., McM., Ph.D. 

The Dean attended the annual meeting of the Association of American 
Universities held at Cornell University, November, 1935. 

(9) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF DENTISTRY 
{Arnold D. Mason, D.D.S.) 

During the year the different departments of the Faculty of Dientistry have 
progressed very harmoniously. The regrettable passing of Dean Wallace Seccombe 
shed a gloom over the whole Faculty as he was held in such high esteem and respect 
by every member of the staff. His death interrupted to some extent the activities 
of the Faculty but emergent adjustments were made as quickly as possible. Doctor 



44 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Seccombe was a strong force in the development of dental education and the 
improvement of dental practice in Ontario, and even elsewhere, and my only hope is 
that I may build well on the fine structure he has erected. 

The registration of students in the regular dental course was 192, an increase 
of 9 over last session. Three candidates enrolled for the B.Sc. (Dent.) degree, and 
one completed the requirements this year and was awarded the degree. Two graduates 
received the degree of M.Sc.(Dent. ) . Twenty young women were accepted for the 
course in Dental Nursing. 

Fifteen dental graduates of other universities entered the final year and 
proceeded to the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. Of these 4 were from 
England, 11 from Australia and 1 from the United States. Three were graduates of 
Guy's Hospital and the others from the following universities: 1 Manchester, 5 
Melbourne, 6 Sydney and 1 Marquette. Dean A. W. Lindsay, on furlough from West 
China Union University, spent the year at his alma mater on a study which qualified 
him for the degree of Master of Science in Dentistry. 

Two post-graduate courses, each covering one week, were held in the subjects 
of oral surgery and anaesthesia, and in periodontology and radiodontia, and were 
attended by 18 dental practitioners from various points in Ontario, Nova Scotia 
and United States. These dentists felt that the instruction received would be of 
much value in their dental practice. No additional expense to the University was 
incurred by these courses. 

Four other graduates, one from Calgary, Fredericton, Toronto and Ohio, attended 
for short refresher courses in orthodontia, ceramics and oral surgery. These men 
expressed their appreciation of the efforts of the Faculty and received considerable 
benefit from their instruction. 

Through the generosity of the Board of the Royal College of Dental Surgeons 
of Ontario and in conjunction with the University, many members of the Faculty 
were able to carry the most recent methods to dental practitioners, even in remote 
parts of the province. This helps to keep the dentist in practice informed of new 
trends in dental thought and improve the standard of service rendered to the public. 
Thirty-seven meetings were held in twenty-one different centres under this extramural 
plan, and were addressed by fourteen members of the Faculty. 

During the year many practitioners and students from other faculties have 
made use of the dental library in addition to the students of this Faculty, and it is a 
matter of but a short time until added facilities will be necessary to adequately house 
the books and museum specimens in possession of the department, as well as leave 
accommodation for reading. 

This year the University for the first time granted the diploma in dental nursing. 
This will unify the arrangements for this course and is much appreciated by the 
Faculty. 

The report of the Curriculum Survey Committee of the American Association 
of Dental Schools is being studied by the heads of departments and other members 
of the staff, and a comparison made with the curriculum of this Faculty. Some 
reports have already been submitted and changes that it is felt will improve the 
instruction to undergraduates are contemplated. The late Dean Seccombe, who was 
Chairman of the Curriculum Survey Committee, was keenly interested in this survey 
and the report was published in book form just previous to his last illness. The 
report is being dealt with in accordance with the plans he proposed. At the annual 
meeting of the American Association of Dental Schools in March, I had the honour 
of being elected to the Survey Committee which is now proceeding with a study for 
the improvement of methods of teaching, development of graduate instruction and 
the training of dental teachers. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 45 

(10) REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE SCHOOL OF HYGIENE 
(/. G. FitzGerald, M.D., LL.D.) 

A decade has passed since this School was established in the Lniversity. To 
provide facilities for the teaching of preventive medicine and public health, to 
establish friendlv and helpful relations with official and voluntary agencies in the 
fields of public health and social work, to maintain intimate and cordial co-operation 
with the Faculty of Medicine, to assume responsibilities with Connaught Laboratories 
for university activities not otherwise feasible, were some of the reasons why a School 
of Hygiene was organised. 

From the first it has been recognised that graduate students from all parts of 
the Dominion of Canada and elsewhere should be offered courses leading to the 
degrees of doctor of philosophy and master of arts and the diploma in public health. 
Also it was an acknowledged responsibility of the School to organise and conduct 
suitable courses of instruction for undergraduates, medical and other, in this 
University. These activities required to be integrated with research and investigation. 
This is made possible through grants and otherwise, by Connaught Laboratories. 
Each year the departments of epidemiology and biometrics, of physiological hygiene 
and of chemistry in relation to hygiene receive from Connaught Laboratories 
substantial grants which make possible the investigation of problems of interest and 
importance. The academic staffs made up largely, but not exclusivelv, of Connaught 
Laboratories personnel, have also administrative responsibilities. They are thus 
investigators, teachers and administrators in the complete discharge of their duties. 

No new courses of instruction have been developed during the session of 1935-36. 
Students to the number of 290 have been enrolled. These have consisted of: — 

Graduate Students, 14 ( of whom 10 were proceeding to the Diploma in Public 
Health). 

Undergraduates : 

Faculty of Medicine, fifth year 123 

Faculty of Household Science, third and fourth years 27 

Faculty of Arts, third year 35 

Department of University Extension 42 

School of Nursing 49 

Students in the diploma in public health course, as has been the case in previous 
year, have come from many parts of Canada and from other countries. This year 
the Provinces of Manitoba (2), British Columbia (2), New Brunswick. Quebec (3), 
were represented and in addition there were one each from India and Jamaica. Of 
these medical graduates preparing themselves for whole-time work in the public 
health field, four held Rockefeller Foundation fellowships and five of them Connaught 
Laboratories fellowships. The student from India, a graduate of this University in 
medicine, was on leave of absence from the Indian Medical Service of which he 
is a member. 

It is of interest to recall that a D. P. H. curriculum was first approved by the 
Senate in 1904. For many years no student applied for admission to the course. 
During the session of 1911-12, a medical graduate engaged in public health work 
petitioned to be permitted to proceed to the examinations leading to the diploma. 
Favourable consideration of the application and success in the subsequent exam- 
inations led to the first diploma being granted by this University in 1912. Since 
that year a total of 146 others have enrolled. Since of the opening of the School of 
Hygiene building in 1927, no less than 97 students have obtained the diploma in 
public health. The great majority are engaged in public health work in Canada. 
More than 30 of them are so occupied in the Province of Quebec alone. They are 
medical graduates of the Universities of Laval and Montreal who have undertaken 
their graduate work here. 



46 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

This year a second appointment to the Hastings Memorial Fellowship was 
made. A. E. AUin, B.A., M.D. of this University, was the recipient. Under the 
immediate direction of Professor D. T. Eraser in the department of hygiene and 
preventive medicine, Dt. Allin has well maintained the prestige of this fellowship 
established by his predecessor. Dr. A. H. Sellers, in the session 1932-33. Dr. Allin 
has explored several problems. The early fundamental work of Ehrlich on ricin 
has been repeated and extended. A study of the toxic action of that antigen and 
immunity thereto have been followed by the elaboration of new methods of assay 
for both toxin and antitoxin. 

A study of sensitisation to diphtheria protein during an attack of diphtheria 
has also been investigated. That sensitisation does occur has been established by 
Dr. Allin and he has found, too, that sensitivity is the rule among diphtheria carriers. 
These results are interesting and important. An investigation of the response of 
macacus rhesus monkeys to diptheria antigens has also been completed. Because of 
the limited number of animals studied this is to be regarded as preliminary to more 
extended work and leads already obtained render such desirable. Twenty-one 
monkeys in the group tested were found to have no natural antitoxin. Success was 
not obtained in infecting the monkey by the respiratory route. Further studies were 
made of the effect of cortin in guinea-pigs injected with diphtheria toxin and a method 
of determining blood volume in guinea-pigs by ascertaining the amount of diphtheria 
antitoxin in the circulation after passive immunisation by the intravenous injection 
of homologous antitoxin was elaborated. 

The very great importance of access to well-organised, well-administered and 
adequately supported official and vountary health and social agencies to both staff 
and students in a School of Hygiene has repeatedly been emphasized in previous 
reports. No School could be more fortunately or happily situated in these respects 
than is this School. Most intimate, friendly and mutually helpful relations exist 
between the Department of Health, Ontario, the Department of Public Health of the 
City of Toronto, and the School of Hygiene, University of Toronto. Similarly many 
other official and voluntary organisations in the public health field, social agencies, 
business organisations and private individuals have all been of the greatest possible 
assistance by permitting graduates and undergraduates to make observational visits. 
The staffs of such organisations have often contributed substantially to the success 
of visits by personal interest, and otherwise. This field work is now supervised by 
Dr. P. A. T. Sneath, to whom very great credit is due for the excellence of the 
arrangements maintained. Warm thanks and appreciation are here extended to all 
those who have made possible a clearer appreciation of the scope and nature of 
public health and preventive medicine in giving permission to staff and students of 
this School to enjoy quite unique facilities and opportunities of observation, study 
and investigation. 

Few changes in personnel have taken place during the current session. Dr. 
Frieda H. Eraser has been promoted to an assistant professorship in hygiene and 
preventive medicine and Dr. James Craigie also has been made an assistant professor 
of epidemiology. 

Details of investigations which have been carried on by members of the depart- 
ments of the School who are also members of Connaught Laboratories staff or in 
receipts of research grants therefrom are to be found in the report of the Director 
of Connaught Laboratories. 

It is a pleasure to record the fact that the School of Hygiene and Connaught 
Laboratories have had the joint opportunity and privilege of entertaining visitors 
from all parts of the Dominion of Canada and from many other countries. Guests 
from the United States of America, the British Isles. Argentina, Australia, Brazil, 
China, Esthonia, France, Germany, Holland, India, Japan, Mexico, Newfoundland, 
Norway, Peru and Switzerland were welcomed to the School of Hygiene during this 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 47 

(11) REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 

(jr. S. Wallace, Esq., M. A.) 

I beg to submit the following report of the work of the University Library for 
the year ending June 30, 1936: 

The number of volumes added to the Library during the year has been 11,425, 
and the number of pamphlets, 8,676, making the total number of accessioned 
volumes in the Library 328,129, and the total number of pamphlets 127,275 — or 
a grand total of 455,404 items. 

The following are the statistics of the use of the Library by undergraduates, in 
comparison with previous years: 

1921-22 1926-27 1934-35 1935-36 

Reading-room books 41.928 106.485 186,605 193,522 

Overnight books 18.998 39,779 107.559 111,929 

Week books 4.782 13,104 23,377 25,128 



Totals 65,718 159.278 317,541 330,579 

This represents an increase during the year of over 13,000 books handled, or an 
increase of approximately four per cent. At the professors' and graduates' register 
there has been a slight decrease, caused no doubt by the smaller registration in the 
School of Graduate Studies. 

I append herewith a statement showing the total circulation in the library during 
recent year: 

Total circulation 1926-27 1930-31 1934-35 1935-36 

To undergraduates 159.278 231.759 317.541 330.579 

To professors and graduates... 20.000 37.388 40.843 39,425 

Totals 179,278 269,147 358.384 370,004 

These figures are exclusive of books taken for consultation from the reference 
shelves, of which between twenty-two and twenty-three thousand have been replaced 
on the shelves by the library assistants during the year. They are. however, inclusive 
of interlibrary loans, of which 666 have been handled during the year. 461 being 
books lent by the University Library, and 205 books borrowed. An interesting 
feature of the interlibrary loan service is the increase in the number of photostats 
and bibliofilms received from other libraries in place of interlibrary loans of books. 
I append also a statement showing the circulation in the medical, political 
science, University College, and law reading rooms, in comparison with last year: 

1934-35 1935-36 

Medical reading-room-: reading-room books 10.761 1 1.195 

over-night books 11,386 12,219 

week-books 3,606 3.622 

25.753 27.036 

Political Science: reading-room books 12.567 11.208 

over-night books 6.890 6.338 

19.457 ] 7.546 

University College: reading-room books 33,325 30.746 

over-night books 17,943 16.466 

51.268 47.212 

Law reading-room : reading-room books 8.822 15,585 

over-night books 2.870 4.368 

week books 251 524 

11,943 20,477 



48 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

The ravages caused by the steadily mounting circulation continues to be a 
problem. During the past year the binding and mending department has prepared 
for binding 2,855 volumes, has mended 2,524 volumes, and has put into pamphlet 
binders or boards 1,075 volumes. 

I am glad to be able to report that the situation caused by the exorbitant 
cost of German scientific periodicals, combined with the unfavourable state of 
exchange between the Canadian dollar and the German mark, has been greatly 
improved by the action of the German publishers in making an all-round 25 p.c. 
reduction in their prices. This action was of course due largely to the pressure 
brought to bear on the German publishers by the American Library Association. 
As a result of it, the cost of periodicals in medicine, biology, chemistry, and other 
scientific subjects, has now abated, so that the cost of these periodicals no longer 
needs the total appropriation, and some funds are available for the purchase of 
monographs. 

Unfortunatelv. no sooner has the library obtained relief from one quarter, 
than an equailv serious drain on its resources has been imposed on it from another 
quarter. A vear ago an Act was passed by the Canadian government removing 
from universitv purchases the exemption hitherto enjoyed from sales and excise 
taxes. This has meant that during the past year, in contravention of the long- 
established principle that books purchased for the University Library should be 
free from taxes, we have been compelled to pay a so-called excise tax of three per 
cent on books imported into Canada, as well as a sales tax of eight per cent on 
the binding done for the University Library by the University Press. I estimate 
that these taxes have diminished the purchasing power of the University Library 
during the past year by at least 81. -500. A particularly objectionable feature of 
the new regulations is that they do not even permit the introduction into Canada 
from the United States of interlibrary loans without the papnent of the so-called 
excise tax. If, for example, the University of Toronto Library borrows from an 
American University Library a rare book valued for purposes of insurance at 
SlOO, we are expected to pay a tax of $3.00 on the book before it can be released 
from the customs, as well as having to pay carriage charges on the book both ways. 
If the Commissioner of Excise persists in his ruling that interlibrary loans are 
subject to excise tax, it will effectively put an end to all interlibrary loans from 
the United States — a serious state of affairs, when it is remembered that there are 
many scientific periodicals not to be found in any library in Canada. It is hoped, 
however, that joint action in regard to the matter will be taken by all the university 
and college librarians in Canada, and that relief may be obtained by a direct appeal 
to the Canadian government. 

I wish again to bring to your attention the services rendered during the past 
year by my assistants in the Lniversity Library, under conditions which, with the 
continued increase in circulation, and the growing congestion in the stack-room, 
reading-rooms, and work-rooms in the Library, become yearly more difficult. In 
this connection. I should like to note also the retirement this year of Miss Helen 
Fairbairn, who has been a valued assistant in the University Library for twenty-eight 
years, after ha\ing served for twelve years in the McGill L niversity Library, and who 
has been for the past fifteen years head of the periodical department in the University 
of Toronto Librarv. Miss Fairbairn carries with her the affection and esteem of all 
members of the library staff, and their best wishes for many years of well-earned 
leisure. 

(12) REPORT ON RESEARCH 

Anatomy, under direction of Professor J. C. B. Grant 

The head of the department has been engaged in preparing the manuscript and 
diagrams of a book he has nearly completed. 

Professor James Crawford Watt has continued research work along lines 
previously established : A. Continuation of the investigation of the processes involved 



UxMVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 49 

in calcification and ossification. Some new technical procedures for demonstrating 
calcium have been devised. These give promise of much usefulness. B. The arrange- 
ment of the cranial venous sinuses related to the confluence of sinuses (torcular 
Herophili ) have been studied in more than 120 cases. Variations of much interest 
have been observed and sketched. An analysis of this series is being prepared. C. 
With the assistance of Dr. A. N. McKillop, further and more extensive investigation 
of the arteries in the posterior cranial fossa in man has been carried on. It is 
expected that a paper will be prepared on this subject during the summer. 

Professor W. H. Piersol has completed the reconstruction and study of a human 
embryo of two somites. The model is so contrived as to show the more important 
aspects of its structure. 

Professor A. W. Ham and M. B. Lewis found that disease of the coronary, 
intestinal, and renal arteries develops as a sequela to a calcium shower induced 
by one enormous dose of activated ergosterol. They showed also that the same 
primary lesion as that induced by an overdose of vitamin D could be produced by 
two weeks' excessive feeding of calcium, phosphorus and acid. 

Dr. Purdv I Fac. of Dentistry I and Dr. Ham are investigating the effect of 
various disturbances of the calcium and phosphorus metabolism on teeth in order to 
determine whether mineral can be withdrawn from the latter. I This work is being 
carried on under a grant from the Canadian Dental Research Association. ) 

Mr. H. C. Elliott and Dr. Ham are investigating the effect, particularly on the 
joints and heart, of a long continued vitamin C. deficiency in guinea pigs. Dr. 
Schillington (Faculty of Dentistry I is studying the effect of Vitamin C. deficiency 
on the teeth of these animals. ( This work is being carried on under a Banting 
grant. I 

Certain B. & M. students, who elected histology as their fourth year option 
subject, performed research under Dr. Ham's direction: thus Miss C. Horner in- 
vestigated the histological changes in the uterus and vagina of ovarectomized rats 
at various time periods following the administration of a single massive dose of 
oestrin: Mr. H. Fine investigated the problem of disuse atrophy of bone by means 
of alizarin staining: Mr. Powell investigated changes caused by scurvy in the blood 
of guinea pigs, particularly with regard to the Arneth count: Mr. H. Copp and Mr. 
W. Perry planned and constructed much of the apparatus for a small tissue culture 
laboratory and succeeded in cultivating chick tissue. Mr. B. S. Leibel investigated 
afresh the architecture of the heart muscle and made advances in our knowledge of 
this structure. 

Professor Ruggles George has investigated the planimetry of the bodies of the 
vertebrae, and has mpde numerous other observations on the vertebrae and on the 
costo-vertebral articulations. This investigation will be completed during the 
summer. 

Dr. M. H. Book is continuing his studies of the respiratory portion of the 
lung. His investigation of this development of the alveoli in the human embryo 
throws some light on the architecture of these structures in the adult lung, and 
tends to disprove the time-honoured concept of a continuous epithelial lining for the 
pulmonary alveoli. 

Professor M. A. H. Siddiqi. M.S.. F.R.C.S., England, professor of anatomy at 
King George V. Medical College, Lucknow, has worked in the department as a 
Vincent Massey Fellow. His studies on the development of the genito-urinary canal 
have thrown new light on our knowledge of the process. The results of his work 
are embodied in his M.A. thesis. 

Mr. H. E. LeMasurier and Dr. B. L. Guyatt have made many technical improve- 
ments in detail related to museum work, such as: an improved coloured injection 
mass with glue as a basis; a method of strengthening osteological material; 
improvements in design of display tables. 



50 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Astronomy, under direction of Professor R. K. Young 

During the session 1935-36 two graduate students were in attendance in the 
department of astronomy and completed the requirements for the degree of Master 
of Arts. Miss F. S. Patterson investigated the stellar wave-lengths in spectrographs 
of small dispersion and determined a number of lines suitable for radial velocity 
work in the region of the spectrum X 4800-5700. Mr. W. H. Stilwell made a 
determination of the spectroscopic orbit of the binary star, H.D. 34762. 

At the David Dunlap Observatory the various members of the staff have co- 
operated in the general programme of observation. The telescope has been in active 
operation since the end of June, 1935, and since that time has been used on every 
clear night from sunset to sunrise. From the date of the opening until May 27, 
1936, we have had a total of 978 working hours. 

Spectrographic Work 

The one-prism spectrograph has been used to measure the radial velocity of the 
fainter stars in and near the Kapteyn areas. There have been secured 753 spectra 
of 430 stars ranging in magnitude down to 8.0. To date 260 of the spectra have 
been measured and the results tabulated prior to publication. In addition to the 
regular programme of radial velocities, the orbits of binary stars have been under 
investigation. Dr. Millman has completed the orbit of the eclipsing binary TX 
Leonis and Mr. Stilwell has obtained a preliminary orbit for the star H.D. 34762. 

Newtonian Focus 

Dr. Helen Sawyer Hogg, as research associate, has been engaged on a programme 
of variable star work in the globular clusters. Ninety direct photographs have 
been secured. These photographs have yielded the periods of 33 variable stars in 
the cluster N.G.C. 6934 and 3 in the cluster N.G.C. 6402. Thirty new variable stars 
have been discovered and nearly 12,000 estimates of magnitude made. The clusters 
N.G.C. 6254, 6760, 6779 and M 13 are under investigation. 

Meteor Research 

Dr. P. M. Millman has continued a programme of visual and photographic 
observation begun in 1933 before the completion of the telescope. To date a 
total of 12,700 observations have been made at the observatory and co-operating 
stations. Photographic programmes have resulted in six meteor spectra during a 
total exposure time of 143 hours and eight meteor trails in an exposure time of 
46 hours with direct cameras. 

Instrumental Work 

A large part of the time of the director has been used in getting the telescope 
and equipment of the observatory prepard for observation and in designing and 
constructing new apparatus. A Hartmann microphotometer and a spectrum 
sensitometer have been constructed in the observatory workshops. The installation 
of the 19-inch telescope is well under way and the instrument will be in active 
operation by July. 

Biochemistry, under direction of Professor H. Westeneys 

Directed bv Professor Wasteneys: 

Mr. Bruce F. Crocker and Dr. Jacob Markowitz, acting on a suggestion from 
Dr. B. P. Babkin have successfully elaborated a new method for completely canulating 
the intestine at anv desired level. Bv this method, the entire meal fed to an animal 
may be collected and analysed. It is believed that by this means a more accurate 
picture of normal digestion mav be obtained than by the methods used hitherto. 
Mr. Crocker in collaboration with Dr. Marion Lawson has used this method to study 
the digestion of its protein component when the food has reached the end of the 
duodenum. There are a number of points of interest in the results obtained to date. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 51 

The time for the passage of a given meal is remarkably constant from one experiment 
to another on the same dog, and also from one dog to another. This time, however, 
varies greatly for meals of different kinds of food. In this connection, it has been 
found that fat definitely retards the passage of the food with the result that the 
protein is more completely broken down when fat is present in the meal. The pH 
of the intestinal contents was found to be always acid and to varv within the limits 
of 4.7 to 5.7. 

Mr. A. W. A. Brown, during the summer of 1935 and the winter and spring of 
1936. has been engaged in a study of the gross metabolism of insects by the method 
of analysis of the excreta. He has found in the case of the flesh-fly larvae that the 
main end-product of nitrogenous metabolism is ammonia, although uric acid is also 
excreted in small amounts. He has succeeded in extracting the deaminating enzyme 
of these larvae which he has shown to be an intra-cellular enzyme, the substrate of 
which is not amino acids but is composed of the higher breakdown products of 
proteins. After studying methods of rearing the grasshopper Melanoplus bivittalus 
he investigated their nitrogenous excretions among which uric acid predominates 
but urea is also present as well as amino compounds. One-fifth of the excreta was 
found to be composed of a non-nitrogenous ( peritrophic ) membrane. 

Dr. V. P. Ignatieff has commenced an investigation of the fat metabolism of 
the Canada Wonder bean, but the considerable technical difficulties which he has 
encountered have, so far, prevented him from reaching any definite conclusions. In 
continuation of his previous investigation into the role of phosphorus in plant 
metabolism he has studied the relative distribution of phosphorus and phosphatase 
activity in the floral parts of nicotiana affinis, petunia, salpiglossus and gladiolus. 
He finds that the sex organs as a whole and in the gladiolus the anthers especially, 
have a higher phosphatase activity than other floral parts. He finds also that in 
gladiolus the highest concentration of phosphorus occurs in the sex organs and 
particularly in the anthers. 

Directed by Professor G. F. Marrian : 

Dr. D. Beall during last summer vacation continued his research on the 
methods of isolation of the oestrogenic hormones from pregnant mare's urine. 

Dr. S. Cohen has continued his work on the nature of combined oestrogens in 
human pregnancy urine. He was successful in isolating in a chemically pure con- 
dition the combined form of oestriol and in identifying it as an oestriol 
monoglucuronide. More recently he has improved and simplified the method 
of isolating this compound and he is accumulating large quantities of it for a more 
detailed chemical examination than was previously possible. 

Mr. A. D. Odell during the first part of the session carried out a research on the 
physiologically inactive polycyclic alcohols which occur in human and equine preg- 
nancy urine. He has been able to show that pregnandiol occurs in human pregnancy 
urine in an acid-hydrolysable combined form. Since pregnandiol is a valuable source 
of the corpus luteum hormone, this work, which makes possible the isolation of the 
former substance in much greater yields than have hitherto been obtained, is of very 
great practical value. Mr. Odell is now making a detailed studv of the physiological 
potencv of oestriol glucuronide on various test animals. 

Mr. B. Schachter has been making a quantitative studv of the excretion of 
oestrogens at different stages of pregnancy in the mare. He has also been attempting 
to isolate and identify the combined form of oestrone which occurs in mare's urine. 
He has made considerable progress towards achieving the latter. 

Mr. G. Butler is engaged in a study of the factors involved in the initiation of 
normal parturition with particular reference to the possible role of the acetyl choline 
contained in the placenta. 

Miss E. Batho is engaged in attempts to synthesise the compound equol which 
occurs in horse's urine and whose constitution was determined last vear in this 
department. She is also attempting to determine the structure of the polyterpene 
compound, ursolic acid, which is present in many vegetable tissues. 



52 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Directed by Professor A. M. Wynne: 

Dr. L. Farber. aided by a grant from the Banting Research Foundation, has 
investigated sevral factors affecting the growth and proteolytic activity of pathogenic 
Staphylococci. 

Mr. M. Freed has continued the study of the synthetic action of pancreatic 
lipase. Several factors affecting the rate of synthesis of glycerides were investigated; 
the experimental results were analysed in terms of their relation to theories of the 
mechanism of enzyme action. 

Mr. L. Rabinowitch has continued the investigation of the hydrolytic action of 
pancreatic lipase. He has studied (a) the affinity of the enzyme for various substrates 
and ib) various problems concerned wath the inhibitory action of representative 
chemical compounds on lipolytic activity. 

Mr. W. H. Fishman has critically examined certain methods for the determination 
of two volatile fatty acids in dilute solution and has modified the methods for use in 
the analysis of fermentation mixtures. 

Professor A. M. Wynne, in collaboration with Mr. J. E. Boyd, Mr. J. A. Jackson 
and Mr. H. A. Proctor, has studied (a) the activity of yeast phosphatase, ih) the 
proteolytic activity of egg-white. ( c ) acid production by Clostridium saccharobutyri- 
cum, id), the lipase activity of soya bean, (el the purification of yeast invertase. 

Biology, under direction of Professor E. M. Walker 

The following summary includes investigations in progress, published, or in 
course of publication, for the year 1935-1936: 

Vertebrate Anatomy 

By Professor W. H. T. Baillie — Eye muscles and movements of eyeball in 
mammals: continued studies on sensitivity and pigmentation in lower 
vertebrates. 
Under the direction of Professor W. H. T. Baillie: 
C. K. Gunn — Origin and nature of pigment in rodent strains. 

Invertebrate Zoology (including entomology and parasitology) 

By Professor Norma Ford — Life history and behaviour of the parasitic flesh-fly 
Wohlfahrtia vigil: determination of the number of instars of Grylloblatta 
and their diagnostic characters: rate of growth of Grylloblatta at different 
temperatures. 

By Dr. F. P. Ide — DistributioH of mayflies in the Ottawa River and in one of its 
tributaries: identification of mayflies from stomachs of Atlantic salmon and 
of mayflies collected by Dr. D. S. Rawson in an investigation of Okanagan 
Lake, B.C., for the Biological Board. 

By Professor E. M. Walker — Thoracic skeleton and musculature of Grylloblatta: 
diagnostic characters of larval stages of Wohlfahrtia vigil a new Macromia 
(Odonata) from British Columbia and its nymph: distribution of Ontario 
Odonata. 

Under direction of Professor E. M. Walker: 

C. E. Atwood — Effect of diff'erent foods and of starvation on longevity, size, 
reproductive capacity and sex ratio in certain insects of economic import- 
ance (Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera ) . 

Miss J. A. Eraser — Ecological studies of caddis-flies and their larvae in streams 
in Algonquin Park, Ont. 

Miss J. F. L. Hart — A comparative study of British Columbia Anomura (hermit 
crabs and related forms), based on both larval and adult structure. 

Professor Wen-Chun Ho (West China Union University) — A comparative study 
of the thoracic musculature of orthopteroid insects. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 53 

Mrs. E. Kuitunen-Ekbauni — Life history of Philometra americana. a nematode 
parasite of the Starry Flounder [Platichthys stellaius) : life history studies 
of the cestode Triaenophonis crassus and the acanthocephalan Leptorhyn- 
choides thecatus: endoparasites of haddock. 

Miss R. D. C. Martin — Life history and ecological studies of two stream-dwelling 
damsel-flies, Agrion maculatum and A. sequahile. 

F. A. Lrquhart — Comparative morphology of the digestive tracts of two 

Orthoptera, Tridactylus apicalis and Nomotettix cristatus: hibernation of 
Tridactylus. 

Marine Biology 

Bv Professor A. G. Huntsman — Factors determining return of the salmon, Salmo 

salar. from the sea (for the Biological Board). 
Under the direction of Professor A. G. Huntsman: 
W. H. Johnson — Food and feeding of the herring, Clupea harengus: daily 

migrations and behaviour of towards light of the copepods Calanus, Pseu- 

docalanus. Acartia, Eurytemora, and Tortonus (also at Atlantic Biological 

Station) . 
H. M. Rogers — Hydrographic faunistic study of the estuarv of the Saint John 

River. N.B. 
J. A. Stevenson — Factors influencing growth and abundance in the scallop, 

Placopecten grandis, in the Bay of Fundy (also at Atlantic Biological 

Station) . 
A. L. Tester — Local populations of the herring. Clupea pallasii, in the waters of 

British Columbia, as shown bv the structure and by the proportions of the 

various vear-classes (also at Pacific Biological Station). 

G. C. Whitelev. Jr. — Factors determining growth and abundance in the cod, 

Gadiis callarias. and the existence of local populations of cod in the New- 
foundland region (also at Newfoundland Fishery Research Laboratory). 
Mr. H. C. White of the staff of the Biological Board of Canada was given 
accommodation in the laboratory for work on the Atlantic salmon, Salmo 
salar, in regard to bird-enemies, fish-enemies, age-determination, return to 
the home stream, and food of the young. 

Vertebrate Embryology 

By Professor A. F. Coventry — Continuation of collection of placentae and em- 
bryos of small mammals. The sectioned series of Peromyscus is approaching 
completion and material for a similar series of Clethrionoinys is in prepara- 
tion. A considerable quantity of Microtus material, as well as less complete 
collections of other genera, is ready for sectioning. 

Animal Ecology, Mammalogy and Ichthyology 

By Professor A. F. Coventrv — Continuation of studies of populations of small 

mammals in Ontario: breeding characteristics of certain Cricetidae in 

Ontario. 
Under the direction of Professor A. F. Coventry: 
G. F. M. Smith — Investigation of the starfish, Asterias vulgaris, as a factor in 

oyster culture in Prince Edward Island. 
By Professor J. R. Dymond — Ecology of fishes of Cache Lake, Algonquin Park: 

ecological and geographical distribution of fishes in Algonquin Park: 

taxonomic studies of maskinonge, Esox masquinongy. 
Under direction of Professor J. R Dymond: 

F. E. J. Fry — Taxonomic studies of Lake Nipissing ciscoes, Leucichthys artedi. 
D. A. Maclulich — Periodic fluctuations in the numbers of varying hare (Lepus 

americanus ) . 
W. R. Whittaker — Growth studies of the pilchard (Sardina caeruleus) . 
J. M. Speirs — Migration studies of birds at Toronto. 



54 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Genetics 

By Professor J. W. MacArthur — Genetics and cytology of the tomato. 

By Professor J. W. MacArthur in collaboration with L. Butler — Rigorous genetic 

and physiological analysis of a quantitive character (size in tomato fruits). 
Bv Professor J. W. MacArthur in collaboration with Dr. A. N. Langford and 

Dr. D. L. Bailey, at Vineland, Ont. — Breeding and testing a new greenhouse 

tomato variety immune to brown mould. 
By Professor J. W. MacArthur in collaboration with Professor Norma Ford — 

Studies of finger, palm and sole prints in families where multiple births 

have occurred: study of the inheritance of physical characters in multiple 

births in man. 
Under the direction of Professor J. W. MacArthur: 
Miss V. E. Englebert — Genetic, cytological and taxonomic studies of blue grass 

species (Poa spp.). 
K. Gunn— Genetics, physiology and biochemistry of a new mutant character, 

hereditary haemolytic icterus, in the white rat. 
Professor G. Raithby (at O.A. College) — Systems of mating in cattle breeds and 

their genetic effects. 
Mrs. M. E. Richardson — Studies in the I.Q. of parents and siblings in social 

problem families. 
A. Wilkes — Mutation breeding and sterility in parasitic wasps. 
By Professor Norma Ford — Investigations of taste reactions in young children 

and in monozygotic twins. 

Comparative Neurology 

By Professor E. H. Craigie — A study of the cerebral cortex of the ostrich: 
comparative study of the lateral cortex in a representative series of the 
Sauropsida: study of the respiratory centre of the cat (in collaboration 

with Professor V. E. Henderson). 

Under the direction of Professor E. H. Craigie: 

Dr. Carl G. Smith — Investigation of pathological changes in the olfactory 
apparatus of the albino rat. 

Miss H. M. Stevens — Relative vascularity in the hypophysis of the cat. 

Limnology 

Under the direction of Professor W. J. K. Harkness: 

C. Carl- — Changes in the flora and fauna of a lagoon in Stanley Park, Van- 

couver, accompanying a transition from brackish to fresh water conditions: 
distribution of plankton in lakes of British Columbia and the relations 
between the plankton and the productivity of the water. 

D. Chitty — Ecology of a marginal swamp, including plant succession, the 

relation of plants to the aquatic microfauna and macrofauna, and the 
relation of these to fish production. Mr. Chitty is continuing this study at 
the Bureau of Animal Production. Oxford, in conjunction with other work 
under Mr. Charles Elton. 

K. H. Doan — Factors controlling production and growth of the small-mouthed 
black bass (Miscropterus dolomieu) in Lake St. Clair and in Algonquin 
Park. ( This study was conducted by the Ontario Fisheries Research Labor- 
atory in co-operation with and by the support of the Ontario Department 
of Game and Fisheries). 

F. E. J. Fry — Movements of cisco of Lake Nipissing, the factors controlling 
these movements and the relation between movements and feeding habits. 
Experimental methods were employed to analyse the eff^ects upon the 
movements of fish produced by changes of temperature, oxvgen and carbon 
dioxide, and the relation between temperature of water and feeding of fish. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 55 

R. R. Langford — Continuation of studi<es on the plankton of Lake Nipissing, 
including their horizontal, diurnal, vertical and seasonal distribution 
throughout the lake. Determination by experimental methods of the reaction 
of plankton to such factors as light, temperature, oxygen and carbon 
dioxide. The distribution of the plankton Crustacea was correlated with 
the feeding of plankton-feeding fish. 

W. E. Ricker — Continuation of studies on the plankton of Cultus Lake, B.C., 
with special emphasis on their seasonal vertical distribution and the relative 
efficiency of different methods of sampling plankton now in common use. 

Experimental Biology 

By Professor L. Irving — Experiments upon the control of respiration in the 
beaver initial to a study of the animal during the act of diving. 

Under the direction of Professor L. Irving: 

E. C. Black — Study of the capacity of blood for oxygen in various fishes and the 
condition of transport in the blood of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The 
physico-chemical study is being related to the known habits of the fish with 
the object of showing the blood characteristics which determine the seasonal 
movements of the fish. 

K. C. Fisher — Extension of studies of the relation of oxygen and oxidation to 
the rhvthmic activity of the heart; divising of various apparatus, including 
(o) a tvpe of electrical resistance thermometer for measuring the changes 
in the rate of flow of blood in solid tissues (the device has been used for 
studying the blood flow in the muscles during asphyxia); and (6) an 
electron tube relav by means of which a current of several millionths of 
an ampere will break a circuit carrying 1000 watts. The relay has been 
applied in the laboratory to thermostatic controls, to a time signalling 
device, and to a recorder for the freauencv of drops falling from a tube. 

Miss Greey — Continuation of studies on the balance of electrolytes in embryonic 
development by determining the changes in phosphates in developing fish 

eggs. 
Miss Robertson — Preparation of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase, which accel- 
erates the hydration and dehydration of carbonic acid: development of 
apparatus and methods for a quantitative determination of the activity of 
the enzyme: distribution of anhydrase in the tissues of invertebrate and 
vertebrate animals and its relation to the formation of calcified deposits in 
the tissues. 

Botany, under direction of Professor R. B. Thomson 

Phanerogamic Botany and Genetics 

Anatomy and Experimental Morphology 

Baldwin, W. K. W. — The organisation of the young sporophyte of Ophioglossum 

and Bolrychium. 
Bannan. M. W. — Investigations of intra-specific variations of wood structure in 

conifers. 
Haldenbv, C. N. — The origin and distribution of horizontal resin canals in the 

conifers. 
Hull. Kathleen L.. & Thomson, R. B. — The anatomical organisation of Lycopo- 

dium and Selaginella. 
Radforth. N. W. — The development of plant embryos in culture fluid. 
Taylor. T. M. C. — The sporeling organisation and the cladorhize development 

of the adult plant in Equisetitm arvense L. 
Thomson. R. B. — Comparison of the vascularisation of the cone-scales in the 

Araucarian conifers. 
Thomson. R. B.. & Hull. Kathleen L. — The organisation of the sporeling of 

Osmunda and of the lower vascular plants. 



56 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Wright, J. Gertrude — The nature of the pit-closing membrane in the higher 
gymnosperms. 

Taxonomy 

Krotkov, P. — Plant Survey work in the Bruce Peninsula; revision of the her- 
barium material; special study of Ontario willows and golden rods. 
Taylor, T. M. C. — (1) A critical study of the genus Betula. 

(2) Plant Survey work in the Batchawana and Port Arthur 
areas, in co-operation with the National Museum of 
Canada. A report on the collection from the former 
area is ready for publication. 
Genetics 

Thomson, R. B., & Wright, J. Gertrude — A Study of abnormal types of Linaria 
vulgaris and their heredity. 

Mycology, Forest Pathology and Cryptogamic Botany 

(Under direction of Professor H. S. Jackson) 

Biggs, Rosemary P. — A cultural study of Thelephoraceae. A cytological study 

of a new species of Dipodascus. 
Cain, R. F. — A taxonomic study of Ontario Sordariaceae and related Sphaeriales. 
Dearness, John — With the co-operation of the Department of Botany, Dr. John 

Dearness, of London, Ontario, is preparing an annotated list of the fungi 

known to occur in Ontario. 
Groves, J. W. — Cultural studies of certain canker forming species of Dermatea, 

Pezicula, Godronia and related forms. (In part submitted for publication). 
Jackson, H. S. — ( 1 1 A study of the rusts of Panama and Costa Rica. 

(2) The mycological flora of the Toronto region and of the 
Temagami Forest Reserve. 

(3) Studies of Ontario Thelephoraceae. 

Lehmann, A. J. V. — A study of the nuclear phenomena of the Germination of 

the teliospores of certain species of Lepto-Puccinia. 
Macrae, Ruth — A study of phosphorescence in Panus stipticus. 

Plant Ecology and Seed Studies 

(Under direction of Professor H. B. Sifton I 

Structural Ecology: 

Baldwin, W. K. W. — A study of Leaf Fall in Crataegus Oxycantha. 

Cormack, R. G. H. — A microchemical and experimental investigation of the 

development of root hairs. (Paper ready for publication). 
McPherson, D. C. — On the structure, form and development of air-spaces in 

roots. 
Sifton, H. B. — On the development of the leaves of Labrador Tea. 
Seed Studies: 

Leggatt, C. W. — Investigation of dormancy in Lettuce seed. (Paper ready for 
publication ) . 

Investigation of certain mathematical aspects of seed analysis. 
McGugan, Miss Jean E.- — The seed-coats of the genus Brassica. 

The occurrence of certain characteristic pigments in 
the cotyledons of Brassica species and varieties and 
their value in seed identification. 
Identification of Brassica seedlings. 
Sifton, H. B. — Investigation of the effect of alternating temperatures and light 

on seed germination. 
Technique : 

Hambly, D. H. — Microscopic illumination for biological work. (Paper about 
ready for publication). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 57 

Plant Physiology 

r L nder direction of Professor G. H. Duff ) 

Brodie. Anne B. — The metabolism of nitrogen and its relation to respiratory 
metabolism. The drift with age of organic nitrogen in unstarved leaf cells 
has been established and related to the respiratory drift. The effects of 
starvation are now under examination. 
Duff, G. H. — Sugar degradation and respiratory metabolism. A study of meta- 
bolic mechanics in the plant cell. The reserve sugar has been 
isolated from the first leaves of wheat in crystalline form and its 
characterisation is in progress. 

The metabolic gradient of the attached wheat leaf, its relation to 
sugar concentration and its modification after isolation. 
Losee, S. T. B. — Anaerobic metabolism in the wheat leaf. 

Phillips, W. R. — The physiology of pears in gas storage. ( In cooperation with 
the Department of Horticulture, Ontario Agricultural College. ) A paper 
is in course of preparation for publication. 
Tomalin, F. E. M. — The influence of age upon the sugar respiration relation. 
A studv of metabolism in the juvenile state for comparison with that estab- 
lished for the state of maturity. 
Walford. E. J. — The respiratory metabolism of the tomato fruit and its relation 
to storage at 12.5° C. ( In co-operation with the Department of Horticul- 
ture, Ontario Agricultural College. I A paper is now being prepared for 
the press. 

Plant Pathology 

I Under direction of Professor D. U. Bailey and in co-operation with the Vine- 
land Experiment Station ) 
Bailey. D. L. — Dead Arm Disease of Grape. 

Diseases of Ornamentals. 

( a I Cytospora disease of Koster's Blue Spruce. 

(6) Suspected virus diseases of lilies and gladiolus. 

Strawberry Root-rot. 
Langford. A. N. — Cladosporium leaf mould of tomato. 
Weaver. L. 0. — Factors influencing the fungous flora of raspberry roots. 

Cytology 

(Under direction of Dr. L. C. Coleman) 
The cytology of Gasteria and Allium. 

Chemistry, under direction of Professor W. Lash Miller 

Thirty-nine students were engaged in research during the past winter under the 
direction of professors of the department of chemistry. The degree of Master of 
Arts was conferred on thirteen of these viz: — Messrs. M. M. Bayne, H. R. Bernstein, 
A. G. Boyes, G. W. Graham, D. J. LeRoy, C. Marchant, R. N. Meals, J. J. Russell, 
A. J. Skev. R. S. Soanes. S. 0. Thomson, F. J. Webb, and I. D. Wintrob; also on 
Mr. J. J. W. MacHattie who worked under Dr. A. E. R. Westman, in the laboratories 
of the Ontario Research Foundation. 

The degree of Master of Science in Agriculture was conferred on Mr. S. G. 
Russell, who worked in the laboratories of the Ontario Agricultural College under 
the direction of Professor R. Harcourt. 

The following were the subjects of research: — 

G. C. Allen, M.A. — Overvoltage 

M. M. Bayne, B.Sc, B.A. — Acid esters of naphthalic acid 

Prof. F. E. Beamish — Analytical determination of the platinum metals 

H. J. Bernstein, B.A. — The Raman effect in electrolytes 



58 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

A. G. Boyes, B.A. — Phenyl ethers from ethylene chlorhydrin 

R. C. Carlisle — The separation of intimately mixed solids 

M. Cohen, M.A. — The absorption of gasses on solids 

L. Cook — Effect of temperature and pressure on the position of spectral lines 

L. H. Cragg, M.A. — The sour taste of acids 

Miss E. V. Eastcott, Ph.D. — Purification of Bios IIB 

Miss M. L. Elder, M.A. — Purification of Bios V 

E. C. Forbes — Effects of platinum metals on the surface of the assay bead 
Prof. A. R. Gordon — Computation of thermodynamic quantities from spectral 

data 
G. W. Graham, B.A. — Density of methyl alcohol vapour 
A. H. Heatley, M.A. — Potential distribution in carbon arcs 
W. A. James — The diffusion of hydrochloric acid 
A. A. Janis. M.A. — Vapour pressures of salt solutions 
L. F. King, M.A. — Rates of reaction of esters with alcohols in alkaline media 

D. J. LeRoy, B.A. — Transport numbers by the moving-boundary method 

F. MacDonald — Preparation of .5, 5'dinitro 2, 2'bitolyl 

C. Marchant, B.A. — Preliminary study of two new constituents of Bios 
R. N. Melas, B.A. — Study of a method for separating certain amino-acids 
J. C. Morgan, M.A. — Diffusion in copper sulphate solutions 

J. R. Patton, M.A. — Base-exchange between certain artificial silicates 
R. J. Romans, M.A. — Photochemical reactions 

J. J. Russell, B.A. — Analytical determination of the platinum metals 
Miss C. J. Sanderson, M.A. — Influence of amino-acids on the yeast-crop 
S. Shankman — The Becquerel effect 

E. M. Sheffield — Cyclisation of 3-acenaphthoyl benzoic acid 

A. J. Skey, B.A. — Adiabatic calorimeter for specific heats of organic liquids 
R. S. Soanes, B.A. — Characteristics of Langmuir probes in carbon arcs 

G. A. Stewart — Specific reducing agents for the platinum metals 

S. 0. Thomson, B.A. — Solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous alcohols 

D. L. Turner — Intermediates for phenanthrene synthesis 

C. Unruh, M.A. — Aromatic diacid chlorides with polyphenols 

M. Wavman — Preparation of bios-constituents from tomato-juice 

F. J. Webb, B.A. — Alkaline reduction of aromatic nitro compounds 

T. W. Westlake — Separation of Fe and As in the presence of Co and Ni 
W. F. Weston, M.A. — Substituted phthalic anhydrides with acenaphthene 
F. E. W. Wetmore, M.A. — Potential of copper sulphate in acid solutions 
I. D. Wintrob, M.A. — Santalyl esters of phenyl-acetic acid 

Food Chemistry, under direction of Professor C. C. Benson 

There have been several graduate students working in this department during 
the year, some of them doing original work, but others doing only a small amount 
of such work but obtaining special training in the chemistry of foods as preparation 
for laboratory work later on. 

Two of the students working in this department and registered in the Graduate 
School have, this year, been granted the degree of Master of Arts — Miss Jean 
Blundell, for a study of physical training in relation to basal metabolism and respira- 
tion, and Miss Dorothy Pearson, for a study of proteins of certain seeds which are 
largelv used in Indian diets. 



Geology, under direction of Professor E. S. Moore 

Professor W. A. Parks completed his study of Devonian Stromatoporoidea 
during the summer months. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 59 

Professor E. S. Moore — Investigation of the geology and ore deposits of the 
Ramore area and of Afton and Scholes Townships, northern Ontario, for 
the Ontario Department of Mines. 

Dt. M. Fritz — Study of the micro-fossils of the Devonian from wells in south- 
western Ontario. 

Under the direction of the staff in geology 

A. Holstein — The heavy minerals in the Silurian rocks of the Niagara 
Escarpment. 

H. G. Way — The Silurian of Manitoulin Island. 

Under direction of Professor E. S. Moore 

J. E. Armstrong — Pyrometasomatic ore deposits. 

O. F. Carter — Structural features of gold deposits in the Precambrian of Ontario. 
H. C. Lane — Function of chlorine in the genesis of ore deposits. 
W. W. Moorhouse — Types of igneous rocks genetically associated with gold 
deposits in Canada. 

B. Russell — Genesis of ore deposits in Cameron Island area, Ontario. 

Household Science, under direction of Professor A. L. Laird 

During the session 1935-36 there were seven graduate students taking work in 
this department but only three of them were engaged in research. 

Miss L. M. S. Davis has continued her study of the comparison of tensile 
strength, detergency, and whiteness retention of fabrics washed by domestic and 
commercial laundry methods, and has been granted the decree of Master of Arts. 
The problem was carried on with the co-operation of the Chemistry Division of the 
National Research Council. Ottawa, and the Toronto Launderers and Dry Cleaners. 

Miss G. H. Donald is working on the calcium content of some Canadian foods, 
and Miss D. E. Mulholland is making a study of low cost special diets. 

Applied Mathematics, under direction of Professor J. L. Synge 

The following researches have been in progress during 1935-36: 
B. A. Griffith. M.A. : Continuation of work on the problem of the flow^ of a 
viscous liquid past a circular cylinder by a combination of the methods of 
Stokes and Oseen. 
A. F. Stevenson. Ph.D.: Generalisation of the Hartree-Fock equations for two- 
electron systems. 
J. L. Synge, Sc.D.: Dynamical theory of electrical commutator machinery. 
Completion of Whittaker's extension of Gauss's theorem 
to general relativity. 
Analysis of the new relativity proposed by Page. 

Medical Research, under direction of Professor F. G. Banting 

Dr. D. A. Irwin and his group of workers have investigated the toxicity of 
various kinds of quartz: the effect of the dilution of quartz by carbon and microcline; 
the toxicity of various mine dusts in the unaltered state and when separated into 
gravity fractions. With Dr. B. C. Coles he has studied the siliceous materials found 
in the lungs and lymphatic glands of non-silicotic persons. 

A quantitative estimation of quartz in dust by X-ray diffraction method has 
been made with the assistance of Mr. H. H. Binden. 

Dr. J. T. Fallon has found that the granulomatous tissue produced by the 
injection of finely particulate quartz contains a silica-free lipid which on injection 
produces a nodular fibrosis. 



CO REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Eh-. Coles has prepared aqueous solutions of quartz which, when injected into 
the lung, produced an early tissue response similar to that given by finely particulate 
quartz. The injection of varying concentrations of such a solution has given further 
information about the toxic properties of soluble silica. 

Dr. W. R. Franks has continued the study of the effect of silica dust and silica 
solutions on monocytes in tissue culture. 

Dr. Franks and Mr. A. Duncan have attempted to develop methods of analysing 
silica dusts by suspending them in fluids of known refractive index and studying 
their light value by the photoelectric dust estimator. 

With the assistance of Mr. H. J. Creech and Miss M. Shaw, Dr. Franks has 
continued the work on the synthesis of chemoantigen related to tumor. 

Dr. Franks and Mr. L. D. Proctor, in co-operation with the department of 
psychiatry, have been investigating the relation of glyoxalase activity to some 
mental diseases. 

Dr. C. C. Lucas has succeeded in isolating the disulphide of normal urine in a 
pure condition. The compound has been identified as 1-cystine. Further work on the 
neutral sulphur compounds in normal urine is in progress. 

Dr. Lucas and Miss M. Dolan have continued the study of leaching silica from 
silicates. 

Mr. K. Watson has been unable to find organic compounds of silicon in biological 
materials. 

Mr. E. L. Outhouse has succeeded in identifying the phosphoric ester from 
tumors obtained last year, as amino-ethyl phosphoric acid. A study of the 
characteristics of the pure compound has led to improved methods of isolation, by 
means of which it is hoped to establish the presence or absence of this compound in 
normal tissues. 

Mr. L. B. Macpherson has been engaged in a study of the fractional hydrolysis 
of cephalin. There is at present some evidence that lecithin and cephalin may be 
precursors of the phosphoric esters found in tumor tissue. 

Mr. F. H. Lawford has prepared several new esters of phosphoric acid to add to 
the homologous series of compounds which he synthesised last year. 

Drs. G. E. Hall, G. H. Ettinger, F. G. Banting and Mr.' G. W. Manning have 
continued the study of the effects of the daily intravenous injections of acetylcholine in 
the dog. Miss J. Lang has investigated the eff'ect of such injections on the cell-count, 
viscosity, CO2 combining-power, sugar, N.P.N, and chlorides of the blood of these 
dogs. 

Other problems being investigated by Dr. Hall and his group are : 

Electrocardiographic changes by vagus-phrenic anastomoses. 

The eff'ect of daily injections of atropine and ephedrine on the blood-pressure 
of the dog. 

The eff^ect of continuous injection of acetylcholine in normal and atropinised 
and eserinised dogs. 

Studies on the serum esterase. 

The effects of long-continued stimulation of the vagus nerve of the dog. 

Dr. F. G. Banting and Miss S. Cairns have continued the work on experimental 
tumor. 



Medicine, under direction of Professor Duncan Graham 

An increasing number of clinical problems are under investigation. It is very 
gratifying to observe the continued interest and activity in clinical investigation 
shown by former whole-time members of the staff who are now serving on a 
part-time basis. 

Dr. Rykert and Dr. Hepburn have published a paper on the use of strophanthin 
in the treatment of auricular fibrillation. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 61 

Dr. Hyland has forwarded for publication a report of his results in the treat- 
ment of myasthenia gravis by glycine and ephedrine. Dr. Maltby has made a 
preliminary report of some observations on glycine metabolism in patients suffering 
from myasthenia gravis. 

Through the kindness of Professor Best, a supply of protamine insulin from 
Professor Hagedorn was made available for the treatment of patients with diabetes 
mellitus. A preliminary report on the physiological and clinical aspects of protamine 
insulin by Dr. Kerr and Professor Best of the department of physiology and Dr. 
Campbell and Dr. Fletcher of the department of medicine has been made. Dr. 
Campbell, Dr. Fletcher and Dr. Kerr have published a report on the use of protamine 
insulin in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. 

Dr. Campbell and Dr. Dauphinee have developed a method for the determination 
of iron in small amounts of blood and tissue which promises to yield valuable 
information in the study of the metabolism of iron. Dr. Campbell has modified 
Bennhold's Congo Red test for amyloid and developed a suitable clinical method 
for the quantitative estimation of amyloid. 

Dr. Cleghorn is continuing his clinical and experimental studies on the adrenals. 
Last vear reference was made to the work of Dr. Cleghorn and Dr. McHenry of the 
department of physiological hygiene on the preparation and assay of adrenal cortical 
extract. They have prepared a potent extract which has proved to be effective in the 
treatment of the crises occurring in Addison's disease. This extract is now being 
made and distributed by Connaught Laboratories. Dr. Cleghorn, S. M. M. Cleghorn, 
M. G. Forster and G. A. McVicar have published a paper incorporating the results of 
a two-vear investigation on the factors influencing the survival of rats after 
adrenalectomy. Dr. Cleghorn and Dr. iVIcVicar have continued their investigation 
on the chemistry of the blood and urine in adrenal insufficiency. 

Dr. Dauphinee and Mr. Wakefield have made a preliminary report on the serum 
phosphatase in hepatic jaundice. 

Studies on liver disorders, anaemia, pigment metabolism, and the peripheral 
vascular system are being continued. 

Mineralogy and Petrography, under direction of Dr. T. L. Walker 

Dr. T. L. Walker has carried on during the year the following investigations: 

The investigation of the insect fauna in the amber from Cedar Lake, Manitoba, 
which was discovered by Dr. Walker, has been continued. The description of the 
species which are of Cretaceous age has been done by Dr. F. M. Carpenter of 
Harvard University and will shortly appear in printed form. 

The study of the moving bubbles in quartz from the Pre Cambrian Mine, Vernon, 
B.C., was continued and a moving picture has been prepared to show the nature of 
these inclusions and the rapid movement of some of them. 

Professor Ellis Thompson has continued his studies on tellurides. 

Mr. V. Ben Meen continued his studies on the character of the quartz in which 
the gold ores of Canada are found. 

Mr. A. S. Dadson continued his work on the relationship between the potential 
of minerals and ore deposition, and his results are nearly ready for publication. 

Mr. James M. Baker has been engaged in an investigation of the mineralisation 
of the ore minerals at the Taylor-Windfall Mine, B.C. 

Obstetrics and Gynaecology, under direction of Professor W . A. Scott 

Dr. Henderson has carried on an investigation of pregnancy and heart disease 
and is reading a paper on this subpect at the Canadian Medical Association in June. 
These cases are now being looked after by a combined cardiac and obstetrical clinic 
in conjunction with the department of medicine with most satisfactory results. 



62 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

The study of Dr. Goodwin's in connection with pelvic inclination in pregnancy 
and the relationship of anthropological factors to labor has been completed and is 
being put in final form for publication. 

Dr. Mann demonstrated a new obstetrical forceps before the New York 
Obstetrical Society and the forceps are now in the hands of the manufacturer pre- 
paratory to being put on the market. During the year Dr. Mann completed a very 
interesting studv of the mechanical factors involved in the dilatation of the cervix 
and presented it to the staff by means of a very ingenious mechanical demonstration. 

Drs. Scott, Cosbie and Mann, in collaboration with the Institute of Radium 
Therapy, have been carrying on the radiological treatment of carcinoma of the 
genital tract and Dr. Cosbie presented to the staff a valuable study of the results 
up to date. 

Dr. Low presented to the staff a studv of the caesarian sections done during 
the last ten years and this is being put into form for publication. 

The study of the physiological changes in the ureters during pregnancy which 
was carried out in collaboration with the department of urologv and radiology has 
been completed and the results are being prepared for publication. 

Dr. M. C. Watson, who has been working as a voluntary assistant in the 
department, has. in collaboration with Dr. Marrian of the department of bio- 
chemistrv. carried out an investigation on the clinical effect of various oestrogenic 
substances, the results of which have appeared in two articles. The work is still 
continuing. 

The study of the sedimentation rate of the erythrocytes in cases of infection, 
cancer, earlv and late toxaemias of pregnancy, new born foetus and at various stages 
of the menstrual cycle have been carried on bv Dr. Scott in collaboration with 
several members of the staff. This work is still being pursued. 

Ophthalmology, under direction of Professor W . H. Loivry 

Dr. MacDonald has overseen the section and study of one hundred and thirty- 
eight pathological specimens, a considerable increase over last year. Papers have 
been read in Ophthalmological congresses based upon the study of some of these 
pathological specimens. Quite a number of these specimens have been sent to the 
department from various centres throughout Ontario. No charge has been made for 
this work and it has come to the time when perhaps some of the expenses of the 
department should be borne bv some compensation for this work done. 

Dr. Morgan has been perfecting a technique for the transplantation of corneal 
tissue in rabbits and has some rather promising results already. So far we have not 
been able to do this on the human eye. 

Dr. Johnston is doing some investigation in the fluid obtained in detached 
retina cases, with the object of adding to our knowledge of this serious disorder. 

Pathological Chemistry, under direction of Dr. Hunter 

Dr. D. L. Selbv and Mr. J. B. Scott with the co-operation of the department of 
medicine, continued the investigation of kidney function in nephritic patients by 
means of xvlose clearance. Thev also began experiments to find a simple method of 
measuring large amounts of iodine in blood ?nd urine. 

Dr. S. H. Jackson completed one stage of his work on the relationdiip of carbo- 
hydrate metabolism and staphylococcus infection. He has shown that the response 
to infection mav be markedlv modified bv high carbohydrate diets. 

Dr. T. F. Nicholson and Dr. R. W. I. Urauhart, with the assistance of Dr. D. 
W. G. Murray of the department of surgery, have devised a method whereby the 
changes in kidney function produced by experimental nephrosis may be separated 
from 'the effects of extraneous lesions and studied by themselves. Using this method 
Drs. Nicholson. Lrquhart and Selby have made a number of interesting observations 
on kidney function in nephrosis. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 63 

Dr. Nicholson and Dr. R. M. Archibald, a voluntary worker in the department, 
have made further investigations on the use of Proteus vulgaris as a reagent for 
glucose and have found a means of quadrupling its activity without changing its 
specificity. They have also been able to delimit more strictly its field of usefulness 
in sugar analysis. 

Dr. Hunter has devised an improved clinical method for the determination of 
urinary urea, and has perfected a manometric procedure for the enzymatic determina- 
tion of rrginine. The latter is being applied to two problems, (1) the specificity of 
the enzvme arginase and (2) the mechanism of the liberation of arginine in tryptic 
digestion. 

Paediatrics, under direction of Professor Alan Brown 

In conjunction with the Connaught Laboratories, an extensive survey has been 
made on children suffering from meningococcic meningitis from the standpoint of 
both treatment and prevention. The work on the development of an eftective 
whooping cough vaccine and also the use of placental extracts in the prevention of 
measles is progressing with satisfactory results. The development of different serums 
is being carried out. 

Working in association with the department of pharmacology and the Banting 
and Best department of medical research, further studies have been made on the 
important subject of the prevention of poisoning in children. Recommendations 
have been made to prohibit the use of certain pharmaceutical products which have 
been found to be the cause of the death of many Canadian children each year. 

Observations have been continued on children suffering from nephritis and it 
has been found that a number of these patients have an underlying anatomical defect. 
Some of these defects lend themselves to surgical correction. Further progress is 
being made in the study of various chest conditions in children from the standpoint 
of their treatment and prevention. 

The joint effort with the department of psychology on an investigation of the 
effect of dietary deficiencies in early life on learning ability is being continued. 

Studies have been made on the iron requirements of children and the availability 
of iron in foods. It has been found that only a portion of the total iron in food is 
available for the iron nutrition of children. This is a very important observation 
and our present conception of iron metabolism will probably have to be changed. 

Interesting studies have been made on the effect of a low mineral intake on 
intestinal stasis. During the past vear it has been found that a diet low in calcium 
and potassium results in marked stasis in the appendix. Further studies are being 
conducted which may give results of considerable practical value. 

The nutritional studies are being continued and information is being obtained 
which indicates very definitely that diets which we have considered adequate are still 
not optimal and that simple changes mav be made which will do much to further 
increase the health of the infant and child. 

Pharmacology, under direction of Professor V . E. Henderson 

I would like to call your attention to the two studies of Choline and certain of 
its analogues by Drs. Roepke and Welch. These papers give us a further insight 
into the mode of action of a very important group of compounds, important because 
one of them we now believe is constantly produced in the body and, indeed, forms 
the means by which nervous impulses set into activity many of the secretory 
mechanisms of the body. 

The paper on the Respiratory Centre by myself and Dr. E. Home Craigie of the 
department of biology is a report on the location of the respiratory centre in the 
IneduUa and its connections. This has been a very wearisome study but is of 
undoubted value both theoretically to pharmacologists and practically to surgeons of 
the central nervous system. 



64 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Dr. Lucas and myself have concluded a paper which is now in press on The 
Physical Properties of Mucus Secretion. This paper reveals the lubricating and 
protective characteristics of the mucus produced in the bronchi and by the salivary 
glands. 

In conjunction with Mr. A. H. R. Smith, working under a grant from the Banting 
Research Foundation, certain derivatives of furan have been studied for their anaes- 
thetic properties. Though they are of theoretical interest, they are not practical 
anaesthetics. This paper is also in press. We have also carried out a further study 
of some of the impurities of the anaesthetic propylene, which has led us to examine 
another group of gases with extraordinary physiological properties. This paper too 
is of theoretical importance, as it discloses a type of impurity which might occur in 
cvclopropane and which will have to be guarded against in its preparation. In 
conjunction with Mr. Smith and Dr. Roepke a method of recording pulse pressure 
electrically has been devised and gives promise of enabling us to solve some of the 
problems of pulse pressure which are so important in clinical medicine. 

Dr. Roepke has undertaken a study of the reactions occurring between acetyl- 
choline and the esterase which breaks it up in the body. This study has revealed 
some very intersting data whose exact interpretation at the moment is not clear, but 
will undoubtedly throw important light on certain of the physiological mechanisms 
of the body. A preliminary report of this work was given before the American 
Pharmacological Society in March and a paper is being prepared dealing with the 
first phase of this work. 

Physics, under direction of Professor E. F. Burton 

A. 

Low Temperature Problems: 

In addition to the regular members of the staff the following have participated 
in this work: A. D. Misener, National Research Council Scholar, who carried out an 
investigation on the influence of magnetic fields on the superconductivity of metallic 
films, and on the specific heats of various substances at the temperature of liquid 
helium; K. E. Mann, B.Sc, B.Ed. (Sask.), who has carried out research on the 
construction, calibration, and use of a new form of superconducting galvanometer; 
A. H. Woodcock, assistant demonstrator, has been working on the thermoelectric 
effect in superconductors; A. I. Cove, assistant demonstrator, who has been working 
en the index of refraction of liquid oxygen, hydrogen, and helium in two states He I 
and He II; E. Bromberg (Columbia University), who was working on the Brownian 
movement at very low temperatures, and on the possibility of producing a permanent 
polarisation in quartz at the temperature of liquid helium; S. M. Dockerty, M.A. 
(Dal.) has just completed a three year research on the specific heat of copper at low 
temperatures. 

Professor H. Grayson Smith and Mr. J. 0. Wilhelm, who have been of great 
assistance in all the low temperature problems, have carried out a special research 
on the distribution of magnetic field about superconductors. The results of this work 
will be reported at the Seventh Congress on Refrigeration, in Holland, in June. 

B. 

Spectroscopy: 

The work in this division has been carried out by A. B. McLay, M. F. Crawford, 
R. Richmond, S. M. Bateson, M. W. Johns, and C. A. Herald. They have been 
continuing the work on the hyperfine structure of the spectral lines of various 
elements. Papers containing the results of the investigations will be published shortly 
as follows: (1) Hyperfine Structure in Tl III (Thallium); (2) Nuclear magnetic 
moment of Bismuth; (3) Term analysis of Mercury III and IV. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 65 

Chemical Analysis by the Spectroscope. 

Mr. Lome Newman and Dr. E. Cohen have been continuing the work initiated 
last year on the specific determination of the absorption of ions by coloidal particles. 

Miscellaneous spectroscopic work has been carried oul as follows: By H. L. 
Welsh, M.A.. on sensitised fluorescence set up in the vapours of other alkali metals 
by the Sodium D lines: L. B. Leppard, M.A.. has concluded his work on the absorp- 
tion of light by liquid ammonia solutions of the alkali metals; Dr. J. M. Anderson, 
of the staff of Scarboro Collegiate Institute, has been carrying out, very system- 
atically, in his spare time, a very important experiment on the persistence of the 
metastable state of atoms. 



Electrons and X-Rays: 

With the co-operation of Dr. W. H. Kohl, special lecturer in the department, 
C. E. Hall. B.Sc. l Alberta l. holder of the Alumni Federation Fellowship, has been 
working in the new field of electron optics, and has completed, almost entirely by 
his own efforts, an electron microscope, of the electrostatic type. This work is so 
promising that the National Research Council has given the department an assisted 
research grant for the continuation of this work during the session 1936-37. 

Analysis of Mine Dust by X-Rays. 

With the support of the Banting Institute, H. H. Bindon, M.A.. has been carrying 
out the X-ray analysis of mine dust by a method developed by Professor G. L. Clark, 
of the University of Illinois. The necessity of this work was first pointed out to 
Professor Clark bv Professor T. L. Walker of the mineralogy department. 

W. F. Oliver. M.A.. demonstrator at McMaster University, has been continuing 
his work on the X-ray spectra of crystalline deposits of various materials. 

A. R. Clark. M.Sc. I Sask. I . has been continuing the work started by Dr. H. F. 
Batho, on the diffusion of ions in rare gases. 

D. 

Miscellaneous: 

G. F. Clark. M.Sc. (Sask. I. and G. F. C. Tait, M.Sc. (Alberta I. have been 
continuing the work on the diffusion of gases through solids; in particular they have 
been testing the diffusion of light hydrogen and heavy hydrogen through copper. 

L. G. Turnbull. M.A. ( Dal. I has held one of the Graduate School fellowships 
during the past year. He has done a very remarkable piece of work on the dielectric 
constant of hydrated and dehydrated salts at high frequencies. This work will prove 
to be of very great importance in the consideration of the crystal structure of these 
salts. 

W'ith the assistance of Mr. Arnold Pitt, of the staff, D. W. R. McKinley has 
been developing an apparatus for a new determination for the velocity of light, 
using the properties of oscillating quartz crystals. This investigation also is a 
promising one. and the National Research Council has given the department an 
assisted research grant to continue this work during the session 1936-37. 
Under the direction of Professor John Satterly (with Mr. J. R. Levitt). 

A continuance of the work on the structure of jets showing how ripples on 
vertical jets mav be utilised to measure values of the surface tension and how they 
are related to the stream line motion in the liquid. Admirable photographs have 
been taken of ripples on water and mercury jets and the measurements linked up to 
hydrodynamic theory. 

An experimental study of the so-called parabolic jets of liquids have been 
undertaken in order to see how nearly such jets conform to parabolic arcs. Contrary 
to common ideas the jets are not parabolas, but the range on the down side is greater 
than the range on the upside. This was foretold in some recent work by Levi-Civita 



66 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

but even here the mathematician does not seem to have all fhe tru'h. The dis- 
crepancies have been carefully measured. 

Under the direction of Professor L. Gilchrist. 

During the summer of 1935 the following geophysical studies were made in the 
Sudbury Basin district, with the assistance of F. J. P. Consitt, F. A. O. Banks, J. E. 
Reid and H. Strangways. 

(a) Location of a body of pyrrhotite in Falconbridge township by magneto- 
metric measurements on the surface of the ground. 

(b) Correlation of surface magnetometric measurements and self potential 
measurements with the probable existence of an extensive deeply placed pyrrhotite 
ore body in McLennan township. 

(c) Preliminary study of the effect of geological structure on the transmission 
of radio waves. 

Professor H. A. McTaggart has been studying the conditions under which mono- 
molecular films of Barium Stearate. spread on a water surface, may be transferred 
from the water to glass surfaces. He has succeeded in producing some very remark- 
able layers of films, which were exhibited at the meeting of the Royal Society in 
Ottawa,' May, 1936. 

Just previous to coming to Toronto, Dr. B. Haurwitz had shewn that "the vertical 
wind distribution in the lowest layers of the atmosphere is greatly modified if the 
isobars and streamlines of the air are curved as in cyclones and anticyclones." He 
has continued his work by investigating the influence of eddy viscosity in curved air 
currents. In connection with a study of the origin of extratropical cyclones as waves 
on the polar front (according to V. Bjerknes) which is in progress, results were 
obtained which have a bearing on atmospheric tides. Since internal surface waves 
cannot appreciably modify the free periods of the whole atmosphere it seems that 
the discrepancy between computed and observed tides can only be overcome by the 
assumption that the tidal oscillations are almost autobaratropic, i.e., a particle 
which was orce in equilibrium with its surroundings will always remain so. A report 
was given at the meeting of the Royal Society of Canada in Ottawa, May, 1936. 

Physiology, under direction of Professor C. H. Best 

The teaching fnd research work of the department was conducted this year with 
the help of an enthusiastic group of junior members of the staff. Dr. C. Beecher 
Weld was appointed head of the department of physiology of Dalhousie University 
and was granted leave of absence for the months of April, May and June. He spent 
this time in London, England. The head of the department was appointed a guest 
lecturer at Yale University and gave a series of lectures on respiration and carbo- 
hydrate and fat metabolism. 

Dr. Robert Kerr and the head of the department have been very much interested 
in the physiological effects of protamine insulin. Several members of the colony of 
diabetic dogs have been very successfully maintained on the new material. Dr. Kerr 
accepted invitations to discuss the results of this work at medical meetings in Atlantic 
City and in Kansas City. 

Professor N. B. Taylor, with Dr. C. B. Weld and Dr. J. F. Sykes, h^s continued 
his researches on calcium metabolism as related to the action of the parathyroid 
hormone and irradiated ergosterol. The phenomenon of tolerance to parathormone 
and irradiated ergosterol, as exhibited by dogs receiving repeated doses of these 
agents, was investigated. A report of these experiments has been published. With 
the help of Dr. A. C. R. M'Gonigle, who devoted this year to research in the depart- 
ment, work upon intestinal obstruction was extended and a study made of the 
possible role played by dead muscular tissue in the causation of surgical shock. Dr. 
Sykes in a series of ultra-filtration experiments investigated the diffusible and non- 
diffusible fractions of the serum calcium in dogs and the effects upon them, respec- 
tively, of parathormone, irradiated ergosterol, parathyroidectomy and the calcium 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 67 

intake level. The results of this investigation formed the basis of Dr. Sykes' thesis 
for his Doctor of Philosophy degree which he obtained this vear. 

In collaboration with Miss J. P. Griffiths. Dr. E. T. Waters has conducted further 
work on the metabolism of fructose in mammals. The rapidity with which the liver 
converts this sugar to some other substance, presumably to glucose, either directly 
or in3irectly, has been shown by the very small amount of fructose present in the 
hepatic tissue of rats absorbing fructose from the intestine. They have been able to 
demonstrate for the first time that the liver is not the only organ of the body which 
can effect this conversion. Certainly when fructose is added to the perfusing fluid 
of a canine heart-lung preparation there is some utilisation of fructose, with a small 
but definite conversion to glucose. They are of the opinion that this conversion 
occurs in the lungs. Glucose-free blood has been prepared for use as perfusing fluid 
in these latter experiments. Using this blood, which has a number of obvious 
advantages, they have also investigated the utilisation by the heart and lungs of the 
substances, such as fatty acids, lactic acid, dihydroxyacetone and glyceraldehyde. 

With Dr. A. H. W. Caulfield and Dr. M. H. Brown, Dr. Waters has made further 
studies on ragweed pollen sensitisation. By the addition of 1 per cent alum to an 
aqueous extract of ragweed pollen it is now possible to induce a high degree of 
sensitisation to the pollen in practicallv all guinea-pigs receiving an intravenous 
injection of the material. Inability to sensitise successfully more than a small pro- 
portion of injected guinea-pigs has been in the past a serious obstacle to obtaining 
conclusive results in some of these experiments. It has been established that the 
carbohydrate fraction of ragweed pollen does not bring about anaphylactic shock in 
animals highly sensitised to ragweed pollen. Recently the very encouraging result 
tljat carbohydrate when injected a few minutes before a shocking dose of antigen 
blocks the otherwise fatal anaphylaxis, has been obtained. 

It has been generally assumed, chiefly on the basis of oral administration of 
lactate, that synthesis of lactic acid to glycogen in the liver is a normal step in the 
"carbohydrate cycle". Evidence that lactic acid is removed by the liver is satisfactory 
but (except in the case of oral administration) increases in liver glycogen subse- 
quently have not been consistently demonstrated. The factors influencing deposition 
have been studied by Dr. Rhoda Grant, and the state of the liver with regard to fatty 
acid concentration has been found to be of importance. 

An attempt has been made by Dr. J. M. Hershey to confirm the findings of 
Asher and his colleagues, that certain extracts of thymus glands produce remarkable 
effects on the development of white rats. The experimental procedure so successful 
in the hands of Rowntree has been followed. The onset of warm weather will delay 
or prevent the completion of this work, but no significant new findings have thus 
far been secured. 

Psychiatry, under direction of Professor C. B. Farrar 

Investigations being carried on in the department included studies in The 
Pathogenesis of Suicide. The Origin and Significance of Ideas of Reference, The 
Socialisation Factors Involved in Foster Home Placement and in the Treatment of 
Children with Conduct Disorders, The Relationship of Thyroid Conditions to Anxiety 
States, Metabolism Studies in Acute Febrile Excitement, The Etiology of Subdural 
Hematoma in Psychiatric Material, Neuropathology of States of Acute Excitement. 

Psychology, under direction of Professor E. A. Boll 

During the session 1935-6. fifty-three graduate students took instruction in 
psychology. Of these, twenty-seven were engaged upon special problems and the 
remainder were taking course work of graduate character; eleven were enrolled from 
other departments. One student completed the requirements for the Ph.D. degree in 
psychology, and six the requirements for the M.A. degree. The names of these 
candidates and the titles of their theses follow: 



68 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

Mrs. E. Palter — The Variability of Performance in Normal and Depressed 
Subjects. 

For the degree of Master of Arts: 

D. L. McEachern — Effect of dictation by meaningful groups of words on 

shorthand speed. 
Mrs. D. Rabinowitch — Effects of success and failure on learning. 
Miss M. L. Rean — Factors related to occupational preference of High School 

boys. 
Miss M. D. Salter — Attitudes and the galvanic skin response. 
W. V. Trott — Accuracy of arm movements in a horizontal working space. 
G. H. Turner — An objective study of analogical and analytical reasoning. 

Two important changes have been introduced this session in the plan of 
graduate instruction for students proceeding to higher degrees in psychology, the 
first concerning the advanced programme that qualifies students as candidates for 
the Ph.D. degree, the second concerning the programme for beginning graduates. 

For several years a single preliminary examination on four papers had been 
used in psvchology as a means for accepting students as candidates for the Ph.D. 
degree. This plan was found not to guarantee sufiBcient knowledge on all the essential 
branches of the subject and hence this plan has now been eliminated in lieu of a 
plan defined in two stages which respectively concern all the academic conditions 
and then the special thesis work. Students will be formally accepted by the depart- 
ment as candidates for the Doctor's degree only when all requirements for the 
academic stage have been certified. 

The other change is on behalf of beginning graduate students who aim at the 
Master's degree in two years. Owing to our large enrolment of graduates from 
various courses and institutions, difficulty had been experienced in appraising their 
training and acquainting them at the outset with the possible lines of specialisation 
in our subject so that they might choose intelligently a branch upon which they 
would concentrate. The situation presented a problem in student guidance which 
required co-operative effort of all the staff for solution. As a pedagogical project 
the staff has therefore combined in organising a new compulsory course for beginning 
graduates, called introduction to research, which will bring all beginners into 
contact during the year with each of the major divisions of graduate work in 
psvchologv and each of the senior members of staff. Specialisation will then be 
deferred largelv until the second year, when these students will have had a wider 
range of experience and opportunity for more intimate consultation than heretofore 
with all members of staff in the department. 

During the vear members of our staff have been engaged on special researches, 
individually and in groups. The previous plan of having joint appointments and 
research responsibilities between our staff and other staffs in the Lniversity and in 
public services outside the University has been continued and extended. This co- 
operation now obtains with the Ontario Department of Health ( Mental Hospitals 
Branch*, The Canadian National Com.mittee for Mental Hygiene. Accident Prevention 
Associations m Ontario, The Toronto Juvenile Court Clinic. The Infants' Home and 
the Big Brother Association of Toronto, and the Department of Paediatrics ( Animal 
Nutrition Laboratorv I of the University. Mr. C. R. Myers through his connection 
with the Ontario Mental Hospitals has conducted an extensive study from case 
historv materials of the causes of Mongolism. Professor W. Line working in asso- 
ciation with the National Committee for Mental Hygiene and the Toronto Board of 
Education has developed a programme of study in the Primary School Grades 
designed to eliminate grade repetition and its psychological effects during the first 
three years of the Public School. Dr. K. S. Bernhardt, working with the research 
staff of the Paediatric z\nimal Laboratory, has supervised two studies on the effect of 
controlled deficient diets on the learning abilitv of litters of voung white rats. It is 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 69 

expected that these studies will furnish important leads in the clinical control of 
diets for children. Professor G. P. Cosgrave has continued the development of 
sensory and motor tests for use in differentiating accident prone and non-accident 
prone industrial employees. Dr. K. H. Rogers, whose work as director of the 
psychological clinic of the Infants' Home for the past two years has greatly con- 
tributed to the problems of foster child placement, was appointed in April, director 
of the work of the Big Brother Association in Toronto. This appointment, in charge 
of one of the leading agencies in the preventive field of child behaviour, furnishes 
an invaluable contact for psychological research and the training of graduate 
students. Dr. Rogers continues on our staff as a special lecturer. His former work 
at the Infants' Home has been taken over by a research assistant in psychology, Dr. 
Donald Snygg. 

On the side of laboratory research. Professor Bott in collaboration with Mr. 
H. C. H. Miller has devised improved methods of studying the time relations of 
muscle action in complex voluntary movements; and with Mr. S. Glen, photographic 
registration of eye-movements in the visual observation of reversed perspective. 

Professor S. N. F. Chant has engaged in four lines of investigation attitude 
measurement with special reference to emotional correlates and their significance for 
mental health; a study upon forms of reasoning; work upon methods of factorial 
analysis in psychological research; and the educational adjustment and mental health 
of individual students. 

In the industrial and accident research laboratory established last year. Pro- 
fessor G. P. Cosgrave conducted an experimental study upon the effect of amount 
and direction of arm movement within the range of manual working space, with 
results that are applicable in the planning of repetitive industrial tasks. His develop- 
ment of a scale for measuring the attitudes of workers towards their jobs has 
continued. 

In the comparative laboratory Dr. D. Snygg, working under Dr. Bernhardt, 
completed and published three studies upon fundamental characteristics of the 
learning process, which have attracted wide and favourable notice. 

In social psychology. Professor J. D. Ketchum has continued the problem of 
analysis of life histories contributed autobiographically by young adults. Qualitative 
analysis has also been applied by Professor Line in evaluating certain thought 
forms characteristic of schizophrenic patients and those characteristic of persons 
possessing various levels of intelligence as measured by standard tests. 

Research in the division of child psychology, conducted under the St. George's 
School for Child Study, will be separately reported by Professor W. E. Blatz, chair- 
man of the Lniversity Committee on research in Child Study in Parent Education 
since 1934-5. 



Surgery, under direction of Professor W . E. Gallie 

During this year the research being conducted by Professor Best and Dr. 
Gordon Murray on the clinical uses of heparin has been brought to such a stage that 
it may now" be used on patients. In order that it may be properly studied in the 
hospital, one of the assistant fellows, Dr. Wilkinson, has been released for six 
months from his regular clinical work in order that he mav study those patients in 
whom heparin is used. It is hoped that the drug will prove of value in preventing 
thrombosis in blood-vessels which have been operated upon, and will lessen the 
incidence of pulmonary embolism after operations. This research will be continued 
by T:he departments of physiology and surgery. 

The alliance of the departments of radiology and surgery continues to work 
satisfactorily and a most important clinical investigation is being conducted there 
by Drs. Richards and Wookey on oral cancer. Hundreds of cases are under constant 
observation and within a short time it will be possible for these gentlemen to issue 
an authoritative statement as to the prognosis and treatment of this disease. 



70 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Similar studies are being conducted by Dr. Richards along with Dr. R. M. Janes 
and Dr. R. I. Harris, on cancer of the breast and sarcoma of bone, and progress is 
being made. 

Clinical studies of the action of staphylococcus antitoxin and toxoid are being 
conducted at the Hospital for Sick Children by Dr. Keith and at the General Hospital 
by Dr. Welsh. As the number of patients is small, it will be a long time before any 
authoritative statement can be made, but the study will be continued until the action 
of these products is well understood. 

The studv of nerve regeneration being conducted by Dr. Sullivan of the depart- 
ment of oto-laryngology, Dr. Lineil of the department of pathology and Dr. Keith of 
llie department of surgery continues. It should be brought to completion within a 
year. 

The department of surgerv, through Dr. Gordon Murray, has been of assistance 
to the department of pathological chemistry in a most promising research on the 
function of the kidney, being conducted by Drs. Urquhart, Nicholson and Selby. 

Therapeutics, under direction of Professor R. F. Farquharson 

Research work in the department of therapeutics is closely linked with similar 
activities in the department of medicine. Dr. J. C. Sinclair was appointed research 
fellow in therapeutics. He has continued the study of the effects of the prolonged 
administration of large doses of irradiated ergosterol to patients suffering from 
parathvroid tetany, with especial attention to the prevention of cataract. He has 
made careful observations concerning the relative efficacy of different calcium salts 
in tetanv and other conditions. In this work he has been assisted by Mr. H. W. 
Wakefield, research assistant in the department of medicine. 

Dr. Sinclair and Mr. Wakefield have also continued the study of pigment meta- 
bolism in various conditions. Thev have made interesting observations on the effect 
'of diet rich in meat protein on the excretion of urobilinogen and on the effect of 
ingestion of certain preparations of bile salts on pigment excretion. 

Report on Research in the Faculty of Dentistry 

The various departments of the Faculty have been carrying on as much research 
as possible in the limited time available for such purposes. 

Dr. Harold K. Box. research professor in periodontology. has continued his 
experiments on tooth mobility in sheep as affected by certain insufflation procedures. 
He also has been engaged on the problem of edema of the gingival tissues. The 
results of these studies are to be published at an early date. Further investigations 
have been carried out on the red bone-marrow of human jaws, especially in relation 
to bone resorption, and the findings have been recently published. Mr. A. F. 
Fenton. the research technician in this department, has been engaged in the study of 
mechanism concerned in the extrusion of fully-developed teeth, and certain new 
phases of the problem are being further pursued. 

Professor F. M. Lott was awarded the M.Sc. ( Dent. I degree for his study of 
ihe phvsical. chemical and biological factors involved in the use of glass as a denture 
base. The techniques used in this process are familiar to the dental profession and 
I feel that this form of denture service will be used in the practice of dentistry. 

Miss D. F. J. Berry is proceeding with a studv of phosphatase in saliva under 
the direction of Dr. Arthur Ham. department of anatomy. 

Dean A. W. Lindsay, on furlough from West China Union University, received 
the M.Sc. ( Dent. I degree on his exhaustive study of dental education and practice 
with special reference to the present national, social and public dental health require- 
ments of China. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 71 

Dr. H. A. Coniinsky w as awarded the B.Sc. I Dent. ) degree for his histo- 
pathological study of the supporting tissues of the tooth in retarded healing fol- 
lowing extraction, which was under the direction of Dr. H. K. Box and Dr. J. H. 
Johnson. His thesis has added some knowledge on this controversial condition and 
Dr. Cominsky hopes to proceed further with this study next year. 

Dr. G. B. Shillington began a study of the relationship of Vitamin C deficiency 
to dental disease, with special reference to animal experimentation, under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Arthur Ham, department of anatomy. 

Dr. E. C. Purdy has been associated with Dr. Ham on research in the field of 
calcium metabolism. This investigation is to study the relationship of alteration in 
serum to the structure of teeth and bones as affected by parathormone and dietary 
deficiencies. 



School of Engineering Research, Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering 

The progress of the School of Engineering Research has been retarded during 
the past year by lack of funds for the employment of research assistants in sufficient 
number. New problems which several members of the staff were desirous of attacking 
could not be undertaken and some problems had to be left in an unfinished condition. 

It is highly desirable that the funds for research in this Faculty be increased, so 
that this research movement, which has had such an encouraging beginning, may 
continue to exert its beneficial influence upon staff and students, and to increase both 
in quality and quantity its contribution to new processes, to engineering practice, 
and to the sciences underlying applied science and engineering. 

Following is a brief description of researches which have been in progress 
during the past year. 

Department of Civil Engineering 

Under the direction of Professor C. R. Young 

The investigation of lateral support of steel columns has been brought a little 
nearer solution. It is hoped to complete the paper this summer. 

Under the direction of Professor T. R. Loudon 

The following researches were commenced: 

(1) An investigation of the compression properties of rubber at low temperature. 

(2) An investigation of the effect of excessive stagger with small gap of biplane 
airfoil arrangement. 

(3) A study of the effect of decalage of airfoil arrangement of number 2. 

Department of Mining Engineering 

Under the direction of Professor H. E. T. Haultain 

( 1 1 The study of apparatus for size analysis of finely ground ore has been continued. 

(with W. E. Mickelthwaite ) 
(2 I A study has been made of the viscosity of mill pulps, that is. of a mixture of 
water and solid particles in suspension. 

Under the direction of Professor F. C. Dyer 

The investigation of methods for the concentration from soil of the contained 
weed seeds has been completed and a report sent to the Seeds Branch of the 
Dominion Department of Agriculture. 

The research on the cleaning of seeds and the separation from weed seeds has 
been continued. A method for removing Dodder seed from clover seed has been 
devised. 



72 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Under the direction of Professor J. T. King 

The investigation on methods of determining gold and silver in cyanide solu- 
tions has been continued. Methods in use in Ontario mines and elsewhere have been 
studied, in an effort to ascertain the causes of inaccuracy in results obtained by the 
use of some of them. 



Department of Mechanical Engineering 

Under the direction of Professor R. W. Angus 

(1) The theoretical investigation of various phases of water hammer and the 
construction of graphical methods for the solution of such problems has been 
continued. 

(with J. B. Bryce) 

( 2 ) An experimental investigation was commenced of water hammer in pipes, 
and a study of the value of the indicator as an instrument for recording such 
phenomena. 

(3 ) A model of the dam at the Abitibi Canyon, and of the discharge gates was 
constructed and experiments were made on the water flow, and a number of co- 
efficients were obtained with different quantities of flow. These experiments have 
proved of great interest to the engineers of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission. 

(with G. R. Lord) 

(4) A study was made, using a scale model, of the wind pressures on the roof 
of an airship hangar for various angles of wind. 

Under the direction of Professor E. A. Allcut 
(with F. G. Ewens) 
Researches on the heat transmission of building materials have been continued 
on the 24-inch and 8-inch hot plates. Considerable discrepancies have been found 
between the published results and those obtained with thick specimens on the larger 
plate. These differences appear to be characteristic of packed fibrous materials and 
the research is being continued to ascertain the reasons for them. 



Department of Applied Physics 

Under the direction of Professor K. B. Jackson 

A research on illumination for the inspection of specularly reflecting materials 
was commenced. 

(with D. H. Hamly) 
The investigation of photographic sensitometry and the characteristics of avail- 
able photographic materials was continued. 

(with D. H. Hamly and V. L. Henderson) 
The photometry of microscope illumination and the design of a microscope 
lamp was in progress. 

Department of Chemical Engineering 

Under the direction of Professor M. C. Boswell 

(with W. R. Gale and G. R. Davidson) 
Iron and copper compounds of humic acids made from peat and cellulose have 
been synthesised and the catalytic properties of the former compound studied, 
(with L. J. Bohn and K. Patrick) 
An improvement in the technique for the quantitative determination of methyl 
groups connected to nitrogen has been devised. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 73 

(with J. A. Rolls) 
A new method for the quantitative estimation of inosite has been devised, which 
is jnuch simpler to carry out than the existing method and possesses a higher degree 
of accuracy. 

(with E. A. Dorfman) 
The research on the catalytic reduction of sulphur dioxide by carbon monoxide 
and steam has been continued. This is a highly efficient process in the laboratory. 
The catalyst also accelerates the production of hydrogen from carbon monoxide and 
steam. The results of this investigation were presented at the Convention of the 
Canadian Chemical Association in June. 

(with W. H. Rapson and G. T. Eaton) 
A research was commenced on the synthesis of creatinine. 

Under the direction of Professor E. G. R. Ardagh 

(with W. H. Bowman) 

Additional work on the chemistry of thiophene has been carried out. 

A research is in progress on the preparation and chemistry of the phenolic 
derivatives of certain long chain acids of the aliphatic series. The results of this 
research were presented at the Convention of the Canadian Chemical Association in 
June. 

The investigation of the mechanism of the corrosion of iron in sodium chloride 
solutions was continued. 

(with E. B. Storey) 

Some progress has been made in a research dealing with the occurrence of 
selenium in the cereal grains of Ontario. 

Under the direction of Professor R. R. McLaughlin 
(with K. R. Hymmen) 
An extension of the existing semi-micro method for estimating carbon and 
hydrogen in compounds containing nitrogen and halogens was continued. 

Under the direction of Professor E. A. Smith 

(with G. V. Jansen and F. B. Pickett) 
The investio;ation of the absorptive properties of silk and their relation to the 
fibre structure has been continued during the past year. The diameter of inter- 
micellar spaces in dry natural silk has been studied. 
I with G. P. Beal and A. R. Thompson ) 
An analytical method for the determination of aluminium in clays using 
8-hydroxvquinoline has been developed and a method of producing aluminium 
sulphate from Northern Ontario clavs using sulphur trioxide has been investigated, 
(with R. P. Bigger) 
An investigation of the syntheses of side-chain halogenated cresols has been 
commenced. 

Department of Electrical Engineering 

Under the direction of Professor H. W. Price 

Following the development and installation of an automatic frequency regulator, 
studies were made of numerous records and charts showing the history of events 
with this control. The purpose was to find how the regulating apparatus and 
generators under control could best be made to meet the very varied requirements of 
operating conditions. 

St. George's School for Child Study, under direction of Dr. W . E. Blalz 

This year the School has completed the ten year experimental period assigned 
to it for proving the value of the child development project suggested by the 
Rockefeller Foundation when the grant was made. 



74 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

The continuous record study of child development, begun in 1926, is going 
forward steadily and, in addition to studies made by graduate students, an investiga- 
tion into methods of home discipline is in progress. During the past year also a 
special study of the effects of certain food elements on mental activity has been 
carried on in co-operation with the Hospital for Sick Children. 

The Nursery School Division has widened its scope by acting in several instances 
as an advisory centre to other organisations or persons planing play-schools and 
playgrounds for pre-school children. A film showing activities throughout the 
nursery school day has been made and is being used to familiarise the public with 
nursery school ideals. 

The Parent Education Division continued its study groups and its leadership 
course, having this year 13 extramural groups led by student leaders in training, as 
against 4 of these in 1930-31, the second session of the course. In addition, 27 groups 
were conducted in Toronto by former staff members and students. Membership in 
the regular School groups, led by members of staff, was considerably increased in 
two instances, where groups were administered by the University of Toronto Exten- 
sion Department. The average membership in these two courses was four times the 
average membership in the five other courses conducted during 1935-36 by the 
School. 

Advice and suggestions have been given, by mail and through personal visits of 
staff members, to the University of Manitoba, which is inaugurating a programme of 
child study in co-operation with the local Child Study Association in Winnipeg. 

Publications include three additions to the University Studies in Child Develop- 
ment and a book on the School Age Child is about to go to press. 

M.A. Theses, 1935-36: 

The effects of success and failure on learning — D. Rabinowitch. 

Factors related to the occupational preferences of high school boys — M. Rean. 



(13) PUBLICATIONS 
FACULTY OF ARTS 

Department of Anthropology 

Mcllwraith, T. F. — Recent Publications Pertaining to Canada: VIII, Ethnology, 
Anthropology and Archaeology. (Canadian Historical Review, March, 
1936, pp. 116-124). 

Department of Archaeology 

White W. C. — A Bronze "Fu-Sang Tree" Lamp. ( Illustrated London News, January 
11, 1936). 
Chinese Jews. (Asia, January, 1936). 
Bronze Lamp with a Phoenix on a Tortoise i28 B.C.). (Illustrated London 

News, April 4, 1936 ) . 
Chinese Jews. (The Jewish Tribune, Montreal, April, 1936). 

Department of Astronomy 

Hogg, F. S. — The Application of the Spectograph to Astronomy. (Journal R.A.S.C., 

Vol. 30, pp. 35-47, 1936). 
Hogg, F. S., and Hogg, Mrs. H. S. — The Opening of the David Dunlap Observatory. 

(Journal R.A.S.C, Vol. 29, pp. 235-298, 1935). 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 75 

Millman. P. M. and Robins. J. A. — Some Properties of Enduring Meteor Trains. 

(Publications A.A.S., Vol. 8, p. 147, 1935). 
Millman. P. M— Meteor News. (Journal R.A.S.C, 1935). 

Young, R. K. — The Hilger Spectograph of the David Dunlap Observatory. (Pub- 
lications A.A.S., Vol. 8, pp. 230-231, 1936). 
The David Dunlap Observatory. (Journal R.A.S.C, Vol. 29, pp. 299-308, 1935). 
The Application of the Spectroscope to Astronomy. (Journal R.A.S.C, Vol. 30, 
pp. 1-13, 1936). 

Department of Biology 

Craigie, E. H. — Some features of the pallium of the cassowary iCasuarius uniap- 

pendiculatus ) . (Anat. Anz., Bd. 81, pp. 16-28). 
Craigie. E. H. and Henderson, V. E. — On the respiratory centre. (Am. Jour, of 

Physiol., Vol. 115, pp. 520-529). 
Fisher, K. C — The respiratory system which maintains the heart in embryonic fish. 

(Proc. Am. Physiol. Soc, March, 1936). 
Huntsman. A. G. — The problem of fish as food. (Canadian Public Health Journal, 

1935, pp. 275-280). 
On the formation of lake balls. (Science, Vol. 82, No. 2122. pp. 191-192). 
Trout fingerlings killed by natural fish hooks or spears; the seeds of Bidens. 

(Canadian Field Naturalist, Vol. 49, pp. 135-136). 
Irving, L., Fisher, K. C and Mcintosh, F. C — The water balance of a marine 

mammal, the seal. (J. Cell, and Comp. Physiol., Vol. 6, No. 3. August 20, 

1935). 
Irving, L., Solandt, 0. M., Solandt, D. Y. and Fisher, K. C — Respiratory character- 
istics of the blood of the seal. I J. Cell, and Comp. Phvsiol.. Vol. 6, No. 3, 

August 20, 1935 ) . 
Irving. L. — The respiration of seals. ( The Collecting Net. Vol. X, p. 125. 1935 ) . 
The carbonate equilibrium in sea water and its significance. (The Collecting 

Net, Vol. X, p. 237, 1935). 
Irving. L.. Solandt, 0. M., Solandt, D. Y. and Fisher, K. C — The respiratory meta- 
bolism of the seal and its adjustment to diving. (J. Cell, and Comp. 

Physiol., Vol. 7, No. 1, October 20, 1935). 
Irving. L. and Manery. Miss J. F. — The significance of the chlorides in tissues and 

organisms. ( Biological Reviews, 1936 ) . 
Irving, L. and Orr. M. D. — The diving habits of the beaver. (Science, 82, p. 569, 

December 13, 1935). 
Manery, Miss J. F.. Welch, Miss M. S. and Irving. L. — The postmortal formation of 

lactic acid in the muscles of seals, ducks and hens. (J. Cell, and Comp. 

Physiol., Vol. 7. No. 1, October 20, 1935). 
Piersol, W. U.— Abstracts. (Biological Abstracts, Vol. 9. Nos. 5, 7, 8, 9; Vol. 10, 

No. 1). 
Robertson, K. and Ferguson, J. K. W. — The distribution of carbonic anhydrase in 

some invertebrates. (Proc. Am. Phvsiol. Soc, March, 1936). 
Walker, E. M. — A Preliminary List of the Insects of the Province of Quebec. Part 

IV, Odonata. ( Supplement to 26th report of the Quebec Society for the 

Protection of Plants, pp. 1-12). 
Welch, Miss M. S. and Irving, L. — A study of the choline oxidizing enzyme. (Proc 

Am. Physiol. Soc, March, 1936). 

Department of Botany 

Bannan, M. W. — Vertical resin ducts in the secondary wood of the Abietineae. (New 
Phytologist, Vol. 35, pp. 11-46. 1936). 
A comparison of the distribution of albuminous and tracheary ray cells in the 
gymnosperms. (American Journal of Botany, Vol. 23, pp. 36-40, 1936). 



76 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Brodie, H. J. — The barrage phenomenon in Lenzites betulina. (Genetica 18, pp. 
61-63, 19361. 

Jackson. H. S. — The nuclear cycle in Herpohasidium filicinum with a discussion of 
the significance of homothallism in Basidiomycetes. (Mycologia 27, pp. 
553-572, December, 1935). 

Thomson, R. B. — The Evolutionary History of the Conifers and their Inter-relation- 
ships. {Summary). (Proceedings of the International Botanical Congress, 
Vol. II, p. 128, 1935). 

Department of Chemistry 

Beamish, F. E. and Russell, J. J. — The Assay of the Platinum Metals. (Journal of 

Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Analytical Edition, March 15, 

1936). 
Beatty, R. M. and Cragg, L. H. — The sourness of acids. (Jour. Am. Chem. Soc, 

No. 57, p. 2347, 1935). 
Farrell, Miss L. N. — The influence of inositol. Bios II A, and Bios I IB on the repro- 
duction of twelve species of yeast. A new constituent of Bios. (Trans. 

Roy. Soc. Can., Sec. Ill, pp. 167-173, 1935). 
Ferguson, J. B. and Janis, A. A. — The Isopiestic Method of Determining the Vapour 

Pressures of Salt Solutions. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. Ill, No. 29, 

pp. 87-89, 1935). 
Gordon, A. R. — The free energies and vapour pressures of the alkali metals. (Jour. 

Chem. Physics, Vol. 4, p. 100, 1936) . 
Gordon, A. R. and Cole, A. F. W. — The diffusion of copper sulphate in aqueous 

solutions of sulphuric acid. (Jour. Phys. Chemistry, Vol. 40, June, 1936). 
Janis, A. A. — The isopiestic method of determining the vapour-pressures of salt 

solutions. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can. 1935, Sec. Ill, p. 87). 
Kenrick, F. B. — The meaning of "composition". (Can. Chem. and Met., No. 19, 

p. 93, 1935). 
Martin, W. H. — A First Course in Chemistry. (August, 1935, the Educational Book 

Company, Limited, Toronto). 
Miller, W. L. — Some applications of the methods of physical chemistry to the study 

of micro-organisms. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can. 1935, Appendix A). 
JVildiers' Bios. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can. 1935, Sec. Ill, pp. 163-165). 
Wildiers' Bios. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can. 1934, Sec. Ill, pp. 185-187). 
Showalter, H. A. and Ferguson, J. B. — The Solubility of Carbon Dioxide in Aqueous 

Solutions containing Alcohols and Sugars. (Can. J. Research, No. 14, 

pp. 120-127, 1936). 
Slantial, Miss H. — The sporulation of yeast, second paper. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can. 

1935, Sec. Ill, pp. 175-188). 



Department of Classics 

Adams, S. M. — Tivo Plays of Euripides. I. The Final Scene of the Hippolytus; 

II. Orestes in the Electra. (Classical Review, September, 1935). 
Grube, G. M. A.— Plato's Thought. (Methuen, pp. 320, London, 1935). 

Dionysus in the Bacchae. (Transactions of the American Philological Associa- 
tion, pp. 37-52, 1935). 
Norwood, G.— Prose Style. (Western Mail, July 2nd, 1935). 
School Examinations. (Western Mail, July 16th, 1935). 
The School Year Opens. (Western Mail, September 25th, 1935). 
The Gift of Prayers in Hippolytus. (Philological Quarterly, XV, i, January, 

1936). 
On Loving the Past. (Western Mail, March 10th, 1936). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 77 

Review of "Some Aspects of Horace" by H. R. Fairclough. I University of 

Toronto Monthly, April. 1936). 
Review of "Plato's Thought'' by G. M. A. Grube. (University of Toronto 

Monthly, May, 1936). 
An Ancient Capital. (Western Mail. June, 1936). 
Owen, E. T. — Sophocles the Dramatist. (University of Toronto Quarterlv, Vol. V, 

No. 2, January, 1936). 

Department of English 

Davis. H. J.— Samuel Butler: 1835-1902. (University of Toronto Quarterly, Octo- 
ber, 1935). 

Dept. of English — A new and much enlarged edition of Representative Poetry. 
(University Press, September, 1935). 

Knight. G. W. — Kubla Khan: an interpretation. (Programme. Oxford, September, 
1935). 
Principles of Shakespearian Production. (Faber & Faber, London. April, 1936). 

Woodhouse. A. S. P. — Milton and his Age. ( University of Toronto Quarterly, Vol. 
V, pp. 130-139) . 

Woodhouse, A. 5. P., Ewart, Miss A. and others — Letters in Canada: 1935. (Uni- 
versity of Toronto Quarterly, Vol. V. pp. 359-456). 

Department of Ethics 

Line, J. — Conditions of Religious Renewal. (The Christian Century. June 3rd, 
1936). 

Department of French 

Abbott, Miss E. B. — Robineau, dit de Beaunoir. et les petits theatres du XVIlIe 

Steele. (Revue d'Histoire litteraire de la France. Janvier-Mars, 1936). 
Laflamme, A. K. — En marge de Maria Chapdelaine. ( La Renaissance. 16 novembre, 

1935). 
Walter, F. — France Retakes the Bastille. (Saturday Night, August, 1935). 
Italian Art in Paris. (Canadian Forum, November, 1935). 
Henri Barbusse. (Action, November, 1935). 
The Universities and the Depression. (New Frontier, April, 19361. 

Department of Geology 

Moore, E. S. and Butts, C. — Geology and Mineral Resources of the Bellefonte 
Quadrangle, Pennsylvania. (United States Geol. Surv.. Bulletin 855. 1936). 

Parks, W. A. — Devonian Stromatoporoids of America. Part I. (University of Toronto 
Studies, Geological Series, No. 39). 

Department of German 

Boeschenstein, H. — Nietzsche und die Schweiz. ( Nationale Hefte. 1936, I). 

Irving Babbits Humanismus. (Studien zur Amerikakunde, Weimar, 1936). 
Lange, V. — Hans Carossa. (Canadian Forum. March. 1936). 

Zur kanadischen Literatur. (Leipzig, 1936). 

Die amerikanische Literaturkritik. (Studien zur Amerikakunde. Weimar, 1936). 

Department of History 

Brown, G. W. — The Grit party and the great Reform convention of 1859. (Canadian 
Historical Review, September, 1935). 



78 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Provincial Archives in Canada. (Canadian Historical Review, March, 1935). 
Flenlev, R. and Weech, W. N. — World History: the Growth of Western Civilization. 

(Dent, 1936). 
Flenley, R. — Cultural History. ( Report of the Canadian Historical Association, 

May, 1935). 
Glazebrook, G. P. de T. — Transport by land and water. { Economist, Dominion of 

Canada Special Review, January 18th, 1936). 
Underhill. F. H. — Social Planning for Canada {part author). (Thos. Nelson and 
Sons, 1935 ) . 
The Conception of a National Interest. ( Canadian Journal of Economics and 

Political Science, August, 1935 I . 
The Development of National Political Parties in Canada. (Canadian Historical 
Review, December, 1935 ) . 



Department of Italian and Spanish 

Buchanan, M. A. — Alhambraism. (Hispanic Review, HI). 
Bibliographical notes. (Hispanic Review, HI). 

Lope de Vega 1562-1635. (University of Toronto Quarterly, Vol. V). 
Goggio, E. — First Personal Contact between Italian and American Leaders of 
Thought. (The Romanic Review, Vol. 27. No. 1, Columbia University 
Press, January-March, 1936 ) . 
Shaw, J. E. — Bibliography of American Studies in Italian. ( Italica, September and 
December. 1935; March and June, 1936). 
American Bibliography for 1935: Italian. (Publications of the Mod. Lang. 

Assoc, of America, Vol. L, Supplement ) . 
Dante and Bonagiunta. (Annual Reports of the Dante Society, Cambridge, 

Mass., 1936). 
Revieiv: Dante Alighieri. II Convivio, Vol. I, ed. Busnelli and Vandelli. (Italica, 
June, 1936). 



Department of Law 

Auld, F. C. — The Canadian Abridgement (Volume II, Aliens to Auditors; Volume 
III, Bailment to Bankruptcy; Volume IV. Banks to Barristers; Volume V, 
Bastards to Boundaries, Burroughs and Co. (Eastern), 1935-6). 

Criminal Investigation. (1 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 436 ff. ). 

Die Fahrlassigkeit im nordamerikanischen Deliktsrecht usw. (1 University of 
Toronto Law Journal, p. 441 ). 
Finkelman, J. — Separation of Powers: A Study in Administrative Law. (1 Uni- 
versity of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 313 ff.). 

Administrative Legislation and Adjudication. (1 University of Toronto Law 
Journal, p. 430 ) . 

The Law of Torts. (1 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 429 ff.). 

Trade Lnions and the State. ( 1 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 431 ff.). 

Combines Legislation: Conspiracy. (13 Canadian Bar Review, pp. 517 ff.). 

Interstate Commerce Commission. (13 Canadian Bar Review, pp. 770 ff.). 

The Laws of Aliens. (Encyclopedia of Canada, Vol. I ) . 

Industrial Standards Act. (Publications of the Industrial Law Research 
Council, Supplementary Bulletin No. 1, 1935). 

Limitations of Hours and Work Act. (Publications of the Industrial Law 
Research Council, Supplementary Bulletin, No. 2, 1936). 
Finkelman, J. and Laskin, B. — The Workings of the Industrial Standards Act. ( Pub- 
lications of the Industrial Law Research Council, Supplementary Bulletin, 
No. 5, 1936). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 79 

Gray, K. G. — Psychiatry and the Criminal Code. (The Ontario Journal of Neuro- 
psychiatry, December. 1935 I . 

Privileged Communications: Physician and Patient. (Bulletin of the Ontario 
Medical Association, Vol. Ill, No. 3. March, 1936). 

The Mental Hospitals Act. 1935. (Bulletin of the Academy of Medicine, 
Toronto, Vol. IX, No. 7, January, 1936 1 . 

Mental Health. (University of Toronto Monthly, 1935). 

Hopkins, E. R. — Measure of Damages. (1 Lniversity of Toronto Law Journal, 
pp. 381 fif.). 

Kennedy, W. P. VI. — The Workings of the British North America Acts. (48 Juridical 

Review, pp. 57 ff . ) . 
British Coal Corporation v. The King. (13 Canadian Bar Review, pp. 613 ff . ) . 
Law and Custom of the Constitution. (21 American Bar Association Journal, 

pp. 821 fl.L 
Annual Survey of Constitutional and Administrative Law. (Canadian Historical 

Review, September, 1935 I . 
The Constitutional Law of the British Empire. (Harvard Law Review. May, 

1936 ) . ' 

The Laic of the Commonwealth. (English Historical Review, June, 1936 L 
Aspects of Legal Education. (Scots Law Times. April. 1936). 
The Colonial Stock Act. (1 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 348 ff.). 
New York Law Revision Committee. ( 1 University of Toronto Law Journal, 

pp. 353 ff . ) . 
Literature of Constitutional Law. (1 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 

428 ff.). 
Maintenance and Champerty. ( 1 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 

431 ff.). 

Rolls of the Justices in Eyre. ( 1 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 

432 ff.). 

Canterbury Administration. (1 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 435 ff . ) . 
Early Tudor Government. (1 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 437 ff . ) . 
Canon Law. (1 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 439 ff . ) . 
The Laiv of Citizenship in the United States. ( 1 University of Toronto Law 

Journal, pp. 441 ff . ) . 
Le droit d'auteur. ( 1 University of Toronto Law Journal, p. 443 ) . 
Self-government at the King's Command. ( 1 Universitv of Toronto Law Journal, 
pp. 444 ff. ) . 
Studies in Church Life under Edivard IIL (1 University of Toronto Law 

Journal, pp. 446 ff . ) . 
India's New Constitution. ( 1 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 447 ff. ) . 

MacKenzie, N. A. M. — The Present International Crisis. ( University of Toronto 

Monthly, February, 1936). 
The International Crisis. (The School, April. 1936). 
The Law in Force in Canada. (The World Book Encyclopedia, 1936). 
Literature of International Laic. ( 1 University of Toronto Law Journal, p.p. 

423 ff . ) . 
Documents of International Law. (30 American Journal of International Law, 

pp. 370 ff.l. 
The British North American. Act and Labour Legislation. (Publications of the 

Industrial Law Research Council. Bulletin No. 2. 1936). 
Confusion in Canadian Foreign Policy. ( Saturdav Night. July. 1935). 
Canada's Obligations and the Covenant of the League of Nations. (Canadian 

Forum, March, 1936). 
The Constitution of Canada and Participation in International Organization. ( 12 

Interdependence, pp. 89 ff . ) . 



80 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Sanctions under the Convenant of the League of Nations. (12 Interdependence, 
pp. 16ff.). 

Canada and the Changing Balance of Poiver in the Pacific. (Institute of 
Pacific Relations, Data Paper, 1936) . 

The Role of International law in Peaceful Change: Problems of Populations 
and Persons. (Proceedings of the American Society of International Law, 
1936). 

Some Aspects of World Affairs Today. (Proceedings of the Ontario Educa- 
tional Association, 1936) . 

Benes: Statesman of Central Europe. Saturday Night, July, 1935). 

Department of Mathematics 

Brauer, R. and Brauer, A. — Ueber Irreduzibilitdtskriterien von. I. Schur und G. 

Polya. I Mathematische Zeitschrift, Vol. 40, July, 1935). 
Braurer, R. — Sur les invariants integraux des varietes des groupes de Lie simples clos. 
(Comptes rendus de 1' academic des sciences Paris, Vol. 201, August, 1935). 
A characterisation of null systems in projective space. ( Bulletin of the American 

Mathematical Society, Vol. 42, April, 1936)". 
Eine Bedingung fiir vollstddige Reduzibilitdt von Darstellungen geivohnlicher 
und m finite simaler Gruppen. (Mathematische Zeitschrift, Vol. 41, June, 
1936).' 

Department of Applied Mathematics 

Synge, J. L. — Some intrinsic and derived vectors in a Kawaguchi space. (American 

Journal of Mathematics, No. 57, pp. 679-691, 1935). 
Mechanical models of spaces with positive-definite line-element. (Annals of 

Math., No. 36, pp. 650-656, 1935). 
Principal null-directions defined in space-time by an electromagnetic field. 

(University of Toronto Studies, Applied Mathematics Series, No. 1, 1935). 
Conditions satisfied by the vorticity and the stream-function in a viscous liquid 

moving in two dimensions between fixed parallel planes. (Proc. London 

Math. Soc, No. 40, pp. 23-36, 1935). 
The motion of a satellite about a heavy nucleus in the special theory of relativity. 

(Trans. Roy. Soc. Canada, Sect. Ill, No. 29, pp. 41-52, 1935). 
The proportionality of energy and frequency for a photon in general relativity. 

(Quarterly Journal of Math., No. 6, pp. 199-204, 1935). 
On the neighbourhood of a geodesic in Riemannian space. ( Duke Math. Journal, 

No. 1, pp. 527-537, 1935). 
Science and Culture. (University of Toronto Quarterly, No. 5, pp. 348-358, 

1936) . 

Department of Oriental Languages 

McCullough, W. S. — The Discipline of the Saints. (The New Outlook, Toronto, 
Jan. 15, 22, 29, 1936). 

Review: "The History and Religion of Israel", by W. L. Wardle. (The Cana- 
dian Churchman, Toronto, May 14, 1936) . 
Meek, T. J. — The Bible: An American Translation. Popular Edition. Co-author 
and revising editor. (University of Chicago Press, 1935) . 

The Israelite Conquest of Ephraim. (Bulletin of the American Schools of 
Oriental Research, No. 61, pp. 17 ff.) 

The Orientation of Babylonian Maps. (Antiquity, Vol. X, pp. 223 ff.) . 

"Bowsprit" in the Oxford Dictionary. (Words, January, 1936). 

The Jewish Caravan, edited by L. W . Schwarz. Contributor. (London, Arthur 
Barker Ltd. 1935). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 81 

Taylor, W. R. — Professor J. F. McCurdy. The Founder of Oriental Studies in the 
University of Toronto. (University of Toronto Monthly, Vol. 36, October, 
1935). 
Ethiopian Art and Literature. (World Youth, Boston, Vol I, May, 1936). 
Department of Philiosophy 
Anderson. F. H. — On Interpreting Locke. (University of Toronto Quarterly, July, 
1935). 

Department of Physics 

Ainslie, D. S. — Special Exploring Coil Method of Measuring Magnetic Fields. (The 

American Physics Teacher, Vol. 4, No. 2, May, 1936). 
Annets, M. and Leitch, J. D. — The Effect of Various Physical Factors on the Counting 

of Silica Dust suspended in Water. (Jour, of Ind. Hygiene and Toxicology, 

Vol. 18, No. 2, February, 1936 ) . 
Annets, M. and Newman, L. — Spectroscopic Estimation of Adsorbed Ions. (Jour. 

Physical Chemistry, Vol. 40, No. 2, February, 1936). 
Braaten, E. 0. and Clark, G. F. — The Diffusion of Helium through Fused Silica. 

(Jour. Amer. Chem. Soc, Vol. 57, p. 2714, 1935). 
The Diffusion of Hydrogen through Copper. (Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond., Ser. A, 

No. 153, February, 1936). 
Burton, E. F. and Oliver, W. F. — The Crystal Structure of Ice at Low Temperatures. 

(Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond., Ser. A, No. 153, December, 19351. 
Burton. E. F., Pitt. A. and McKinley, D. W. R. — Velocities of Ultra-sonic Sounds. 

(Nature, No. 137, April 25, 1936) . 
Burton, E. F., Tarr, F. G. A. and Wilhelm, J. 0. — Thermo-electric Effect and the 

Supra-conducting State. (Nature, No. 136, July, 1935). 
Crawford, M. F. and Wills, L. A. — Hyperfine Structure Formulae for the Con- 
figuration />'5. (Phys. Rev. No. 48. p. 69, 1935) . 
Gilchrist, L. — Cosmic Radiations and Astronomical Research. (Jour. Roy. Astron. 

Soc. Canada, March, 1936). 
Haurwitz, B. — Weaves of Pressure and Wind at the Top of a Ground Inversion. 

(Bull. Am. Met. Soc, No. 16, p. 153, 1935 1 . 
On the Change of Wind with Elevation under the Influence of Eddy Viscosity 

in Curved Air Currents. (Gerl. Beitr. z. Geophysik. No. 45, p. 243, 1935). 
Supplementary to the above: On the Change of Wind Elevation, etc. (Gerl. 

Beitr. z. Geophysik. No. 47. p. 203, 19.36). 
On the Vertical Wind Distribution in Anticyclones, Extratropical and Tropical 

Cyclones under the Influence of Eddy Viscosity. (Gerl. Beitr. z. Geo- 
physik, No. 47, p. 206. i936 1 . 
On the Structure of Tropical Cyclones. ( Q. J. Roy. Met. Soc, No. 62, p. 145, 

1936). 
The Daily Temperature period for a Linear Variation of the Austausch Co- 
efficient. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., No. 30, 1936). 
Hendrick. A. C. and Burton, E. F. — A Case of Bone Sarcoma treated by Colloidal 

Arsenic. (Canadian Medical Association Journal, No. 33. p. 421, 1935). 
Kohl. W. H. — A New Method for the Application of Luminescent Screens to Glass 

Surfaces. (Canadian Journal of Res., No. A. 13, p. 126, 1935). 
JViiddleton. W. E. K. — On the Colours of Distant Objects, and the Visual Range of 

Coloured Objects. (Trans. Rov. Soc. Can., Third Ser., Sec. Ill, Vol. 

XXIX, p. 127, 1935). 
The Climate of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Surrounding Regions in Canada 

and Newfoundland, as it affects Aviation. (Can. Met. Memoirs, No. 1, 

1935). 
Unusually Great Visual Range over Ontario. (Quar. Jour, of Roy. Met. Soc, 

Vol. LXI, October, 1935). 
How Far Can I see? (Scientific Monthly, Vol. XLI, October, 1935). 



82 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Experiments with a Tele photometer. The Dependence of Extinction Coefficient 

upon Wave-length. (Gerlands Beitr. z. Geophysik, No. 44, p. 358, 1934). 
Visibility in Meteorology. ( University of Toronto Press, 1936 I . 
Die Farben Entfernter Objekte und die Sichtweite Gefdrbter Ziele. (Met. Zeits., 

Vol. 52. p.' 507, December, 19351. 
Misener, A. D. — Magnetic Effects and Current Sensitivity of Superconducting Films. 

(Canadian Jour, of Res., No. A14, p. 25, 1936). 
Pitt, A. and McKinley, D. W. R. — Variation with Temperature of the Piezoelectric 

Effect in Quartz. (Canadian Jour, of Res., No. A14, p. 57, 1936). 
Satterly. J. — The Age of the Earth. (Trans. Devon. Assn. for Adv. of Sci. Lit. and 

■ Art. Vol. LXVII, 1935). 
Satterly, J. and Strachan, J. C. — A Measurement of Surface Tension by Means of 

Stationary Waves on a Vertical Jet. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Third Ser., 

Sec. Ill, Vol. XXIX, p. 105. 1935 ) . 
Smith, H. G., Mann, K. C. and Wilhelm. J. 0. — A Neiv Superconducting Galvano- 
meter. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Third Ser., Sec. Ill, Vol. XXX, p. 13, 

1936). 
Smith, H. G. and Wilhelm, J. O. — Superconductivity. (Revs, of Mod. Physics, No. 

7, October. 1935 ) . 
Thomson, A. — Lunar Atmospheric Tides over Canada. (Jour. Roy. Astron. Soc. of 

Canada. December. 1935). 
Wilhelm, J. 0. — Extremely Low Temperatures. Parts I, IL IIL (Refrigeration and 

Air Conditioning, Vol. I, Nos. 5, 6. 7). 
Wilhelm, J. 0., Misener, A. D. and Clark. A. R. — The Viscosity of Liquid Helium. 

(Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond., Ser. A, No. 151, September, 1935). 
Young, A. C. — The Influence of a Magnetic Field on the Dielectric Constants of 

Gaseous and Liquid Nitrogen and Oxygen. (Canadian Jour, of Res., No. 

A13, p. Ill, 1935). 

Department of Political Science 

Biss, Miss I. M. — Hydro-Electric Poiier. ( Encylcopaedia of Canada, Volume III 

(G to Lau ) , University Associates of Canada, Toronto, 1936). 
Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario. (Encyclopaedia of Canada, Vol. 

Ill (G to Lau). LTniversitv Associates of Canada. Toronto, 1936). 
Recent Power Legislation in Ontario. (The Canadian Journal of Economics 

and Political Science, University of Toronto Press. May, 1936 ) . 
Bladen, V. W. — The Economics of Federalism. (The Canadian Journal of Eco- 
nomics and Political Science, August, 1935). 
"Utopian" Individualism. (The Commerce Journal, 1936; The Canadian Forum, 

May, 1936 ) . 
Drummond. W. M. — The Financial Position of Canadian Farmers. ( Family Herald 

and Weekly Star, December 15, 1935; Western Producer, December, 1935). 
Price Raising in the Dairy Industry. (The Canadian Journal of Economics and 

Political Science. November. 1935 ) . 
Spreading the Burden of Business Depressions. (Canadian Countryman, June 

20, 27, 1935 ) . 
Innis, H. A. — For the People. (University of Toronto Quarterly, January, 1936). 
Approaches to Canadian Economic History. (Commerce Journal, 1936). 
Discussion in the Social Sciences. ( Dalhousie Review, January, 1936). 
Unused Capacity as a Factor in Canadian Economic History. (Canadian Journal 

of Economics and Political Science. February, 1936). 
Cape Breton and the French Regime. (Transactions of the Royal Society of 

Canada. 1935). 
Settlement on the Mining Frontier. (Toronto, 1936). 
Notes on Problems of Adjustment in Canada. (Journal of Political Economy, 

December, 1935 j. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 83 

Fis fling Industry and Fur Trade. (Encyclopaedia of Canada) . 
Jackman, W. T. — Economic Principles of Transportation. (Toronto: University of 

Toronto Press; London: Humphrey Milford, 1935). 
Present and Future Problems of '1 ransportation. (Chicago: The Traffic World, 

Nov. 8, 9, 1935; New York: The Railway Age, Nov. 9, 1935). 
Government Ownership of Railways. (The Commerce Journal, published by the 

University of Toronto Commerce Club, February, 1936 ) . 
Some Vital Questions. (London: Transport Management, January, 1936). 
MacGregor, D. — Provincial incidence of the Canadian Tariff. (Canadian Journal of 

Economics and Political Science, August, 1935). 
The Recent Financial Relations Between the Provinces and the Dominion. 

(Economic Journal, March, 1936). 
The National Income of Canada. (Bank of Nova Scotia Monthly Review — 

November, December, 1935 ) . 
Statistical Survey of Recent Economic Conditions in Canada. ( London and 

Cambridge Economic Service, August 7th, November 7th, 1935; February 

7th, May 7th, 1936. The letter for February 7th was reprinted by the 

Royal Economic Society). 
Problem of Public Debt in Canada. (Canadian Journal of Economics and 

Political Science, May, 1936). 
Morgan, L. T. — Background of the Industrial Revolution. (Agricola Study 

Association, August, 1935). 
The Industrial Revolution. (Agricola Study Association, August, 1935). 
Effects of the Industrial Revolution. (Agricola Study Association, August, 

1935). 
Parkinson, J. F. — Trends in Canadian Banking. (The Economist, London, January 

18, 1936; Special Review, Dominion of Canada, pp. 49-55). 
Bank Credit and Monetary Policy 1930-1935. (The Commerce Journal, Annual 

Review, 1936). 
The Social Credit Movement in Alberta. (The Australian Quarterly, Sydney, 

March, 1936, pp. 6-15). 
The Economics of Mr. Aberhart. (Canadian Forum, Toronto, November, 1935). 
Plumptre, A. F. W. — Series of three articles on the Nationalization of the Bank of 

Canada {starting October 26, 1935). (The Financial Post, loronto). 
Why we have a central bank. (Saturday Night, Toronto, December 7, 1935). 
German Monetary Theory [a review). (The Canadian Journal of Economics 

and Political Science, Vol. 1, No. 4, November, 1935). 
The Evidence Presented before the "Canadian Macmillan Commission'. (The 

Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science, Vol. 2, No. 1, 

February, 1936). 
Plumptre, A. F. W. and Gibson, J. D. — The Economic Effects of Recent American 

Monetary Policies on Canada. (Published by the Canadian Institute of 

International Affairs). 



Department of Psychology 

Bernhardt, K. S. — The Selection and Guidance of College Students. (The Ontario 

Vocational Guidance Association, Bulletin No. 5, September, 1935). 
Bott, E. A. — Undergraduate Instruction in Psychology. ( Journal of Amer. Assoc. 

of Medical Colleges, Vol. II, No. 4, 1936). 
Chant, S. N. F. — Leadership. (The Canadian Credit Institute, September, 1935). 
Review of ''Personality Maladjustments and Mental Hygiene," by J. E. Wallin. 

(Psych. Bulletin, April, 1936). 
Chant, S. N. F. and Myers, C R. — An Approach to the Measurement of Mental 

Health. (Amer. Journal of Orthopsychiatry, January, 1936). 



84 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Cosgrave, C. P. — The Will to Work. (The Canadian Credit Institute, Bulletin No. 
56, November, 1935). 
Collection of Occupation Information. (The Ontario Vocational Guidance 
Association, Bulletin No. 13, June, 1936). 
Ketchum, J. D.- — Guiding and Personality Development. (The Canadian Guider, 
Vol. 3, No. 6, November. 1935 ) . ' 
Sex Education: Why. When and Hon. (The Canadian Mentor, Vol. 18, No. 3, 
February-March, 1936). 
Line. W. — Mental Hygiene. Research and Teacher Training. (Co-author) . The 

School. Vol. 24, No. 7, 1936). 
Snygg, D. — The Relative Difficulty of Mechanically Equivalent Tasks: I. Human 
Learning. (Journal of Genetic Psychology, Vol. 47, pp. 299-320, 1935). 
The Relative Difficulty of Mechanically Equivalent Tasks: II. Animal Learning. 

(The Journal of Genetic Psychology, Vol. 47, pp. 321-336. 1935). 
Mazes in which Rats take the longer Path to Food. ( The Journal of Psychology, 
Vol. I, pp. 153-166, 1936). 

Child Psychology ( St. George's School) 

University of Toronto Studies: Child Development Series. 
Blatz, W. E. and Ringland, Mabel Crews — A Study of Tics in Preschool Children. 

(University of Toronto Press, 1935). 
Blatz, W. E. and Millichamp, D. A. — The Development of Emotion in the Infant. 
(University of Toronto Press, 1935). 
Outlines for Parent Education Groups: Preschool Learning; Staff of St. 
George's School for Child Study, Parent Education Division. (University 
of Toronto Press, 1936). 
Blatz, W. E. — Modern Mental Hygiene. ( Religious Education. July, 1936) . 

What do the Children think of the Movies? (Chapter 18, in The Movies on 
Trial — A Svmposium. edited by Wm. J. Perlman, Macmillans, February, 
1936). 
Bott, H. — The Learning Process; the basis for Educational Programs. (In Growth 
and Development; Pub. Progressive Educational Association, New York, 
1936). 
Millichamp, D. A. — Nursery School Education. (Child and Family Welfare, Vol. 
XI, December, 1935 I . 
The Significance of Play at the Preschool Level. (Child and Family Welfare, 

Vol. XIL January,' 1936 ) . 
The Role of the Nursery School Child. (Child and Family Welfare, Vol. XII, 
March.' 1936). 



FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

Department of Anatomy 

Grant, J. C. B. — On the Frequency and Age Incidence of Duodenal Diverticula. 
(The Canadian Medical Association Journal, No. 33, pp. 258-262, 1935). 
An Anomalous Duodenal Pouch. (The British Journal of Surgery, Vol. XXIII, 
No. 89, 1935 ) . 
Siddiqui, M. A. H. — Variations in the lower end of the femora in modem Canadians 
and in American Indians. (Journal of Anatomy, April, 1936). 
Development and homology of the penile urethra and associated glands in the 

Spermophile iCitellus Tridecemlineatus) . (Journal of Anatomy). 
The prostatic utricle in the male Spermophile. (Journal of Anatomy). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 85 

Siddiqui. M. A. H. and Le Masurier, H. E. — The microscopic anatomy and homology 
of the end of the penis of the Indian Ground Squirrel {Funambulus 
Palmarum I . 



Department of Biochemistry 

Beall. D. — Some notes on the isolation of oestrone and equilin from the urine of 

pregnant mares. (Biochem. J., Vol. XXX, No. 4, pp. 577-581, 1935). 
Brown. A. W. A. — The excretion of ammonia and uric acid during the larval life of 

certain muscoid flies. (J. Exp. Biol.. Vol. XIII, No. 2, pp. 131-139, 1936) . 
Miscellaneous physiological observations on the laboratory bleeding of flesh flies 

and of Melanoplus bivittatus Say. (Can. Entomologist, April, 1936). 
Cohen, S. L. and Marrian. G. F. — The Hydrolysis of the combined forms of oestrone 

and oestriol present in human pregnancy urine. (Biochem. J., Vol. XXIX, 

No. 7. pp. 1577-1585, 1935). 
The isolation and identificalion of a combined form of oestriol in human 

pregnancy urine. (Biochem. J., Vol. XXX, No. 1, pp. 57-65, 1936). 
Farber, L. — Applications of pervaporation. (Science, Vol. 81, p. 158, 1935). 
Farber. L. and Wvnne. A. M. — Studies on pancreatic proteinase I. (Biochem. J., 

Vol. XXIX. No. 10. pp. 2313-2322. 19351. 
Studies on pancreatic proteinase. II. The effects of various compounds on the 

activity of the enzyme. (Biochem. J.. Vol. XXIX. No. 10. pp. 2323-2330, 

1935 L ■ 
Johnston, W. W. and Wynne, A. VI. — The amylase of Clostridium acetobutylicum. 

(Jour. Bacteriology, No. 30, p. 491, 1935). ' 
Marrian. G. F. and Beall. D. — The constitution of equol. (Biochem. J.. Vol. XXIX, 

No. 7. pp. 1586-1589, 1935). 
Weinstein, S. S. and Wynne. A. M. — Studies on the pancreatic lipase I. (J. B.C.. No. 

2, p. 112. 1936). 
Studies on pancreatic lipase. II. Influence of various compounds on the 

hydrolytic activity. (J.B.C., No. 2, p. 112, 1936). 

Department of Medicine 

Caulfeild. A. H. W. — Tulip Fingers. (Canadian Medical Ass. Journal, Vol. 34, 
pp. 506-510. 1936). 

Caulfeild, A. H. W.. Brown, VI. H. and Waters, E. T. — Experiments to determine 
whether the allergically active substance in Ragweed Pollen Extract is a 
single entity or multiple. (The Journal of Allergy, St. Louis, Vol. 7, No. 1, 
November. 1935 ) . 

Elliott. J. H. — Pneumonia. (Bulletin of the Academy of Medicine, Toronto. October. 
1935). 

Trow, E. J. — Industrial Dermatoses. i Industrial Hygiene Section at the National 
Conference of the Canadian Public Health Association with the Ontario 
Health Officers' Association, The Canadian Tuberculosis Association, and 
the Canadian Social Hygiene Council. Toronto. June. 1935). 
Oriental Sore — Report of a Case. (American Dermatological Association at 
Swampscott. Mass., June 6th, 1936 ) . 

Department of Medical Research 

Armstrong. A. R. — Purification of the Active Phosphatase Found in Dog Faeces. 

(Biochem. Jour'.. Vol. XXIX, No. 9. pp. 2020-2022. 1935). 
Banting. F. G. and Gairns, S. — Resistance to Rous Sarcoma. (Can. Med. Assoc. 

Jour.. Vol. XXX, pp. 615-619. 1934). 



86 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Belt, T. H., Irwin, D. and King, E. K. — Silicon and Dust Deposits in the Tissues of 

Persons without Occupational Exposure to Siliceous Dusts. (Can. Med. 

Assoc. Jour., Vol. 34, pp. 125-133, 1936). 
Botterell, E. H. and King, E. J. — Phosphatase in Fractures. (The Lancet, p. 1267, 

June, 1935). 
Coles, B. C. — The Tissue Reaction to { Particle-free) Silica Solutions. (Royal Society 

of Canada, 1936). 
Ettinger, G. H. and Hall, G. E. — Synergy of Adrenaline and Acetylcholine on the 

Pulmonary Blood-Vessels in the Rabbit. (Quart. J. Exp. Phys., Vol. 27, 

No. 3, October, 1935). 
Fallon, J. T. and Banting, F. G. — The Cellular Reaction to Silica. (Can. Med. Assoc. 

Jour., Vol. 33, pp. 404-407, 1935). 
Fallon, J. T. — Specific Tissue Reaction to Phospholipids. (Royal Society of Canada, 

1936). 
Franks, W. R. and Watt, A. J. — The Phagocytosis of Silica by Surviving Leucocytes. 

(Trans. Roy. Soc. of Can., Sect. V, p. 43, 1934). 
Hall, G. E., Ettinger, G. H. and Banting, F. G. — An Experimental Production of 

Coronary Thrombosis and Myocardial Failure. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., 

Vol. 34,' pp. 9-15, 1936). 
Irwin, D. — The Experimental and Pathological Aspects of Silicosis. (Annals Int. 

Med., Vol. 9, No. 5, November, 1935). 
Outhouse, E. L. — Amino-Ethyl Phosphoric Ester from Tumours. (Biochem. Jour., 

Vol. XXX, pp. 197-201, 1936). 
Ross, J. R. and Lucas, C. C. — A New Method for the Determination of Minute 

Amounts of Lead in Urine. (J. Biol. Chem., No. 2, p. Ill, October, 1935). 
Tait, H. and King, E. J. — The Oxidation of Lecithin and other Fatty Substances in 

the Presence of Gluthathione. (Biochem. Jour., Vol. XXX, pp. 285-290, 

1936). 
Watson, J. K. and King, E. J. — Salts of Silico-Molybdic Acid with Organic Bases: 

The Gravimetric Determination of Small Amounts of Silica as Pyramidon- 

Silicomolybdate. (Mikrochemie, Vol. 20, pp. 49-56, 1936). 

Department of Orstetrics and Gynaecology 

Frawley, D'A. — Edometriosis — Diagnosis and Treatment. (Bulletin of the Academy 

of Medicine, Toronto. May, 1936). 
Henderson, D. N. — The Treatment of Menorrhagia and Metorrhagia by Anterior 

Pituitary-Like Hormone. (Canadian Medical Association Journal, No. 32, 

p. 615, 1935). 
Johnston, H. W. — A Case of Carcinoid Appendix. ( Canadian Journal of Medicine 

and Surgery, No. 79, pp. 81-83, March, 1936). 
Mann, J. — The Mechanism of Rotation in Occipito-Posterior Positions. (Canadian 

Medical Association Journal, December, 1935). 

Department of Oto-Laryngology 

Burnham, H. H. — An Anatomical Investigation of Blood Vessels of the Lateral 
Nasal Wall and Their Relation to Turbinates and Sinuses. (Journal of 
Laryngology and Otology, No. 50, pp. 569-592, August, 1935). 

Calhoun, J. C. — A Case of Meningitis due to B. Proteus with Recovery. (Canadian 
Medical Association Journal, No. 34, pp. 679-680, June, 1936). 

Goldsmith, P. G. — Treatment of Acute Upper Respiratory Infections. (Sectional 
Meeting of the American College of Surgeons, Buffalo, March, 1936). 
The Management of the Common Cold: Infectious Febricula. (Sectional 
Meeting of the American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological 
Society, January, 1936). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 87 

Goldsmith. P. G. and Ireland, P. E. — Mixed Tumours in the Nose and Throat. 

{ Sectional Meeting of the American College of Surgeons, Buffalo, March. 

1936). 
Ireland, P. G. — Association of Toxic Deafness to Toxic Amblyopia. (Archives of 

Otolaryngology, No.'21, pp. 459-463, 1935). 
Rhinoscleroma — with report of a case. (Canadian Medical Association Journal. 

No. 34, p. 313. March, 1936). 
McGregor, G. — A Pathological Study of Bone Profileration in the Accessory Sinuses. 

(American Medical Association, Atlantic City, June, 1935). 
Strachan, J. G. — Foreign Body Trapped by Multiple Strictures of Oesophagus. 

(Canadian Medical Association Journal, No. 34, p. 313, March. 1936). 
Acute Otitis Media in Children. (The Bulletin of the Academy of Medicine, 

Toronto, June, 1936). 
Sullivan, J. A. — The Surgical Treatment of Facial Palsy by an Autoplastic Nerve 

Graft. (Section of Surgery, Academy of Medicine, Toronto, January. 

1936). 
A Review of Fifteen Cases of Facial Nerve Paralysis and Treatment. 

Department of Paediatrics 

Brown, A. — Feeding of the New-Born. (Medical Press and Circular, Vol. CXCI, 

No. 5033. October 23, 1935, London, England ) . 
Boyd. Miss G. — Lobar Collapse in Children. (J. A.M. A., Vol. 105, p. 1832, December, 

7th, 1935). 
Drake, T. G. H., Tisdall, F. F. and Brown, A. — Further Observations on the 

Antirachitic Effect of Irradiated Fresh Milk. ( Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., 

No. 34. p. 279. 1936 ) . 
Irradiated Evaporated Milk in the Prevention of Rickets. (Jour. Ped.. Vol. 8, 

No. 2. p. 161. February, 1936). 
Johnston, Miss M. M. and Kaake, Miss M. J. — Bacteria on Fresh Fruit. (Am. Jour, 

Pub. Health. Vol. 25, No. 8, p. 945, August, 1935). 
Bacteriological Studies of Three Small Epidemics of Infectious Diarrhoea in 

Children. (Jour. Ped.. Vol. 7. No. 1. p. 65. July. 1935). 
An Investigation of the Role of Anaerobic Streptococci in Infectious Diarrhoea 

in Toronto. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., No. 33, p. 632, 1935). 
Morgan, E. A. — Cyanosis of the Neiv-Born. (Journal of the American Medical 

Association, Vol. 105, pp. 1085-1088. October 5, 1935). 
Morgan, E. A. and Brown. A. — Cyanosis of the Neiv-Born. (J.A.M.A., Vol. 105. 

p. 1085. October 5, 1935). 
Robertson, Mrs. E. C. — Diarrhoea and Typhoid Infections. (Can. Pub. Health Jour., 

p. 37, January, 1936). 
Ross, J. R. and Lucas, C. C. — A New Method for the Determination of Minute 

Amounts of Lead in Urine. (Jour. Biol. Chem.. Vol. 111. No. 2. p. 285, 

October, 1935). 
Ross, J. R. and Summerfeldt, Miss P. — Haemoglobin in Children. (Can. Med. Assoc. 

Jour., No. 34. p. 155, 1936). 
Silverthorne, N. — Paediatrics in Europe. (University of Toronto Medical Journal, 

December, 1935 ) . 
Silverthorne, N. and Eraser. D. T. — Observations on the Action of Human and 

Animal Blood on the Meningococcus. (Jour, of Imniun.. Vol. 29. No. 6, 

p. 523. December. 1935). 
Snelling, C. E. — Tetany in the New Born. (Jour. Ped.. Vol. 7. No. 4. p. 465. October. 

1935). 
Jaundice in Children. (Bulletin of the Academy of Medicine, p. 93, January, 

1935, Toronto). 



REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Snelling, C. E. and Brown, A. — A Case of Hemolytic Jaundice with Bone Changes. 

(Jour. Ped., Vol. 8, No. 3, p. 330, March, 1936). 
Snelling, C. E. and Erb, I. H. — Suprarenal Atrophy. (Jour. Ped., Vol. 7, No. 5, 

p. 669, November, 1935). 
Summerfeldt, Miss P. — Iron and Its Availability in Foods. (Trans. Section on 

Pediatrics, A.M.A., 1935) . 
Rheumatism in Children. (University of Toronto Medical Journal, February, 

1936). 
Summerfeldt, Miss P. and Johnston, Miss M. M. — Ketogenic Diet in Persistent 

Pyuria. (Arch. Dis. Child, Vol. 10, No. 59, p. 389, October, 1935). 
Tisdall, F. F. — Inadequacy of Present Dietary Standards. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., 

No. 33, p. 624, 1935; Trans. Section of Pediatrics, A.M.A., 1935). 
Prevention of Dental Caries and the Improvement of Health by Dietary Means. 

(Pennsylvania Medical Journal, December, 1935.). 
Warner, Miss E. N. — Survey of Mongolism. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., No. 33, p. 495, 

1935 ) . 



Department of Pathology and Bacteriology 

Anderson, W. A. D. — A Histological Study of the Pineal Gland. (For the degree 

of M. A.). 
Belt, T. H. — Demonstration of Small Pulmonary Emboli at Autopsy. (J. Tech. 

Methods, No. 15, pp. 39-41, 1936). 
Belt, T. H., Irwin, D. and King, E. J. (With the Department of Medical Research). — 

Silicon and Dust Deposits in the Tissues of Persons without Occupational 

Exposure to Siliceous Dusts. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., No. 34, pp. 125-133, 

1936). 
Burchell, H. B. — A Case of Pernicious Anaemia ivith Uric Acid Deposits in the 

Kidneys. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., No. 34, pp. 540-541, 1936). 
Donohue, W. L. — Studies of the Intervertebral Disc. (For the degree of M.A.). 
Duff, G. L. — Experimental Cholesterol Arteriosclerosis and Its Relationship to Human 

Arteriosclerosis. (Arch. Path., No. 20, pp. 81-123 and pp. 259-304, 1935). 
Erb, I. H. and Farmer, A. W. (With the Department of Surgery, and the Hospital for 

Sick Children). — Ileocolitis; Acute Ileocolitis Simulating Appendicitis and 

Characterized by Edema of Ileocecal Region and Mesenteric Glands; Its 

Relation to "Regional Ileitis'^ or "Chronic Cicatrizing Enteritis'\ (Surg. 

Gynec. & Obst., No. 61, pp. 6-14, 1935). 
Erb, I. H. and Snelling, C. E. (With the Department of Pediatrics). — Suprarenal 

Atrophy. (J. Pediat., No. 7, pp. 465-467, 1935). 
Fetterman, G. H. — Vascular Lesions in Surgically Excised Stomachs. (Arch. Path., 

No. 20, pp. 189-200, 1935). 
Galloway, R. J. M. — The Changes in the Appearance of the Wall of a Muscular 

Artery Between Diastolic and Systolic Blood Pressures. (Am. J. Path., 

No. 12, pp. 333-340, 1936). 
Holman, W. h.— Studies on Influenza. (Am. J.M. Sc, No. 191, pp. 426-446, 1936). 
Josephson, J. E. — Complement; and the Complement Titre of the Blood Serum in 

Cases of Lobar Pneumonia and Bronchopneumonia. (For the degree of 

B.Sc.(Med.). 
Kerwin, A. J. — Persistant (Partial) Trunctus Arteriosus Associated with Double 

Aortic Arch. (J. Tech. Methods, No. 15, pp. 142-147, 1936). 
Klotz, 0. — Tendencies in Modern Medicine. (Bull. Academy of Medicine, pp. 38-49, 

November, 1935, Toronto). 
Albrechl von Haller (1708-1777). (Ann. M. Hist., No. 8, pp. 10-26, 1936). 
Experimental Arteriosclerosis and Its Teaching in Reference to the Aetiology of 

Human Arteriosclerosis. (Comptes Rendus de la Deuxieme Conference 

Internationale de Pathologic Geographique, Utrecht, pp. 120-229, 1934) . 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 89 

Linell. E. A. — Some Recent Advances and Events in Neurology. (University of 

Toronto Medical Journal, Vol. 12, No. 7, May, 1935). 
Peterson. J. C. — Vascularization and Haemorrhage of the Intima of Arteriosclerotic 

Coronary Arteries. (For the degree of B.Sc. (Med) ). 
Magner, W. — Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., No. 33, 

pp. 401-403. 1935). 
Nachlas. A.. Duff. G. L., Tidwell. H. C. and Holt, L. E. — Liver fmnction as tested by 

the lipemic curve after intravenous fat administration. (J. Clin. Invest., 

No. 15, p. 143, 1936). 
Plewes. F. B. — Malignant Melanomatosis. (Am. J. Cancer. No. 26. pp. 732-737, 

1936). 
Preston, F. C. — Bacteriophage. A Review of the Literature on Bacteriophage and 

the Report of an Attempt to Produce an Artificial Lytic Agent. (For the 

degree of B.Sc. (Med.)). 
Rae. Miss M. V. — Spontaneous Regression of a Hypernephroma. (Am. J. Cancer. 

No. 24. pp. 839-841. 1935). 
Congenital Aneurysm of Interventricular Septum Complicated by Subaortic 

Stenosis and Other Anomalies. (J. Tech. Methods. No. 15, pp. 136-139, 

1936 I . 
Rich, A. R. and Duff. G. L. — Experimental and Pathological studies on the path- 
ogenesis of acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis. (Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp.. 

No. 58, pp. 212-259, 1936). 
Richardson, J. C. — A Tumour of the Adrenal Gland Composed of the Elements of 

Bone Marrow Tissue. (Am. J. Cancer, No. 25, pp. 746-752, 1935). 
Robinson. ^' . L. — Cancer as the Pathologist sees it. (Health, 1935, Autumn issue). 
Wainwright. C. \^ . and Duff, G. L. — Monocytic leukemia. (Bull. Johns Hopkins 

Hosp., No. 58. p. 267, 1936). 

Department of Pathological Chemistry 

Harding. V. J... Nicholson, T. F. and Archibald, R. M.^ — Some properties of the 
reducing material in certain fractions of normal urines. The nature of the 
"free'' fermentable sugars and the fermentable sugars produced on hydro- 
lysis in "fasting'" urines. (Biochem. Jour.. Vol. XXX, p. 326, 1936). 

Harding, V. J.. Nicholson, T. F. and Jackson, S. H. — Soiiie properties of the reducing 
material in certain fractions of normal urines, (a) The effect of certain 
"type meals" on the "hydrolysable sugar" in urine, (b) Some further 
evidence as to the nature of the hydrolysable sugar in urine. (Biochem. 
Jour.. Vol. XXX, p. 335, 1936). 

Nicholson. T. F. — The use of some micro-organisms in sugar analysis. The quanti- 
tative differentiation of fructose and mannose. (Biochem. Jour.). 

Nicholson, T. F., Urquhart. R. W. I. and Murray, D. W. G. — A method for the 
production of unilateral nephrosis in experimeiitnl animals. ( Can. Chem. 
and Met.). 

I rquhart, R. W. I. and McCollum, J. L. — The urea clearance lest compared with 
other renal function tests in urology. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour.. No. 33, 
p. 25. 1935). 

Trquhart. R. W. I. — Laboratory procedures in nephritis. (Bull. Acad. Med., Vol. 7, 
p. 110, 1934). 
Water balance. (University of Toronto Medical Journal. Vol. 13. p. 245. 1936). 

Urquhart, R. W. I.. Nicholson, T. F. and Selby, D. L. — Some observations on kidney 
function in experimental nephrosis. (Can. Chem. and Met.). 

Department of Pharmacology 

Henderson, V. E. and Craigie. E. H. — On the Respiratory Centre. ( Am. J. Physiology, 
115, 520. 1936). 



90 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Lucas, G. H. W. and Henderson, V. E. — On the administration of iron. (C.M.A.J. 

34, 53, 1936). 
Mawson, E. H. and Welch, A. D. — A note on the possible lipotropic action of 

Alkylamrnonium Compounds. (Biochem. J., 30. 417. 1936). 
Welch, A. D. and Roepke, M. H. — A comparative study of choline and certain of its 

Analogues. (I. J. Pharm. Exp. Thera., 5.5, 118, 1935). (II. J. Pharm. 

Exp. Thera., 56, 319, 1936). 

Department of Physiology 

Best, C. H. — The internal secretion of the pancreas. (J. Am. Med. Ass., Vol. CV, 

p. 270, 1935). 
Best, C. H., Grant, R. and Ridout, J. H. — The "lipotropic" effect of dietary protein. 

(J. Physiol., Vol. LXXXVI, p. .337, 1936). 
Caulfeild, A. H. W., Brown, M. H. and Waters, E. T. — Experiments to determine 

whether the allergically active substance in ragweed pollen extract is a 

single entity or multiple. (J. Allergy, Vol. VII, p. 1, 1935). 
Alum as an adjuvant in sensitizing guinea pigs to ragiveed pollen. (J. Allergy. 

1936). 
Fisher, K. C. — The respiratory system uhich maintains the heart rate in embryonic 

fish. (Proc. Am. J.' Physiol., Vol. CXVI, p. .50, 1936). 
Grant, R. — Some factors influencing the glycogen- forming function of the liver after 

ammonium lactate perfused "in vivo". (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. XXX, 

Sec. V. 1936). 
Griffiths, J. P. and Waters. E. T. — The utilization of fructose in the mammalian 

organism as shown by experiments on hepatectomized and eviscerated 

preparations. (Am. J. Physiol., 1936). 
Irving, L., Fisher, K. C. and Mcintosh. F. C. — The water balance of a marine. 

mammal, the seal. (J. Cell, and Comp. Physiol., Vol. VI, p. 387, 1935). 

Irving, L. and Manery. J. F. — The significance of the chlorides in tissues and 
organisms. (Biol. Reviews). 

Irving, L., Solandt, 0. M., Solandt, D. Y. and Fisher, K. C. — Respiratory clmracter- 
istics of the blood of the seal. (J. Cell, and Comp. Physiol., Vol. VI, 
p. 393, 1935). 

Kerr. R. B. — Protamine insulin. (University of Toronto Medical Journal, Vol. 
XIII, p. 191, 1936). 

Kerr, R. B., Best, C. H., Campbell. W. R. and Fletcher, A. A. — Protamine insulin. 

(Can. Med. Ass. J.. Vol. XXXIV, p. 400, 1936; Can. Pub. Health J., Vol. 

XXVII, p. 1.57, 19.36). 
Manery, J. F., Welch, M. S. and Irvine, L. — Tlie postmortal formation of lactic acid 

in the muscles of seals, ducks and hens. (J. Cell, and Comp. Physiol., 

Vol. VII, p. 131, 1935). 
Mawson, E. H. and Welch, A. D — A note on the possible lipotropic action of 

alkylammonium compounds. (Biochem. J., Vol. XXX, p. 417, 19-36). 
Sykes, J. F. — Diffusible and non-diffusible calcium followins. parathormone and 

irradiated ergosterol. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. XXX, Sec. V. 1936). 
Taylor, N. B. — The physiology of sleep. (Bull. Toronto Acad, of Med., Vol. IX, 

1936). 
Taylor, N. B., Weld, C. B. and Svkes, J. F. — Parathormone tolerance in dogs. (Brit. 

J. Exp. Path., Vol. XVII, p. 104, 19.36). 
Waters, E. T. and Griffiths. J. P. — The utilization of various metabolites by the heart- 
lung preparation. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. XXX, Sec. V, 1936). 
Welch. M. S. and Irving, L. — A study of the choline oxidizing enzyme. (Proc. Am. 

J. Physiol., Vol. CXVI, p. 159, 1936). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 91 

Department of Psychiatry 

Farrar, C. B. — The Differential Diagnosis of the Major Psychoses. ( Proceedings 
of the Inter-State Post-Graduate Medical Assembly of North America, 
October. 1935. Detroit. Michigan). 

Lewis, E. P. — Some Preventive Aspects of Mental Hygiene as related to Schizo- 
phrenic. (Canadian Public Health Journal, September, 1935). 

Department of Surgery 

Couch, J. H. — Haemangioma with Fracture through Invaded Bone. (Canadian 
Medical Association Journal. October. 1935). 
Epidermoid Cyst in Bone of Skull. (Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, April. 

1936). 
Buerger's Disease. (Lniversity of Toronto Medical Journal. April. 1935). 
The Tendon of Achilles. (Canadian Medical Association Journal. June, 1936). 
Couch. J. H. and Couch. H. N. — The Literary Illustrations of Aretaeus of Cappadocia. 
(Canadian Medical Association Journal. November, 1935). 
Caesarean Section. (Canadian Medical Association Journal. February. 1936). 
Coulthard. H. S. and Harris. R. I. — A Report of Three Cases of Chordoma. (The 

Canadian Medical Association Journal, Vol. 33, p. 522-527, 1935). 
Graham. R. R. — The Diagnosis and Management of Acute Cholecystitis. (Jour. 
Canadian Medical Association. 1935). 
The Operative Repair of Sliding Hernia of the Sigmoid. (Annals of Surgery. 

October, 1935). 
Surgical Emergencies in General Practice exclusive of Trauma. (Jour. Canadian 

Medical Association, 1936). 
The Surgeon'^s Debt to Fundamental Science. ( Surgery, Gynecology and 
Obstetrics. April, 1936). 
Harris. R. I. — Arthrodesis for Tuberculosis of the Hip. (Journal of Bone and Joint 
Surgery, Vol. XVII, No. 2, pp. 318-323. April, 1935). 
The Role of Sympathectomy in the Treatment of Peripheral Vascular Disease. 

(The British Journal of Surgerv, Vol. XXIII, No. 90, 1935). 
Fat Embolism. (The Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 105, 

pp. 1013-1016. September 28, 1935). 
Appendicitis. (The Bulletin of the Vancouver Medical Association). 
Chronic Osteomyelitis. (The Bulletin of the Vancouver Medical Association). 
Successful Though Crippled. (The Canadian Public Health Journal. December, 

1935). 
Acute Infective Lesions of Joints — Suppurative. (The Bulletin of the Faculty 
of Medicine. University of Toronto. Januarv. 1936 ) . 
Harris, R. I. and McDonald. J. L. — The Effect of Lumbar Sympathectomy upon the 
Groivth of Legs Paralyzed by Anterior Poliomyelitis. (Journal of Bone 
and Joint Surgery, January, 1936 ) . 
Janes, R. M. — Surgery in the Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis. (Canadian 

Medical Association Journal. Vol. 33. pp. 289-392. 1935). 
LeMesurier. A. B. — The Operative Repair of Cleft Palate. ( Canadian Medical 

Association Journal, August. 1935). 
MacFarlane. J. A. — Anterior Dislocation of the Hip. (The British Journal of 

Surgery, Vol. XXIII, No. 91, January, 1936). 
McKenzie, K. G. — Intracranial Division of the Vestibular Portion of the Auditory 
Nerve for Meniere's Disease. (Canadian Medical Association Journal, 
April. 1936). 
Mental Disorders in Relation to Trauma. (Journal of Neuro-Psychiatry. April, 
1936). 
Thomas, R. H. — Traumatic Lesions of Joints: Sprains. Strains and Dislocations. 
(Bulletin of the Academy of Medicine, Toronto. April, 1936). 



92 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Department of Therapeutics 

Rudolf, R. D. — A Glimpse at the History of Therapeutics. (The Charles MacKay 
Lecture, September 7, 1935, at Canberra, Australia) . 
Some Personal Impressions of the British Medical Association World Tour. 
(Canadian Medical Association Journal, Vol. 34, pp. 326-329, 1936). 

School of Hygiene and Connaught Laboratories 

Allin, A. E. — Immunity to ricin acquired by oral administration. (Trans. Roy. 

Soc. Can., Vol. XXX, Sec. V, 1936). 
Barrett, H. M. — The antirachitic effect of ultraviolet radiation transmitted by a 

smoky atmosphere. (J. Indust. Hyg., Vol. 17, pp. 199-216, 1935). 
The determination of trichlor ethylene in air. (J. Indust. Hyg., Vol. 18, pp. 

341-348, 1936).' 

Best, C. H. and Campbell. J. — Anterior pituitary extracts and liver fat. (J. Physiol., 

Vol. 86, pp. 190-202, 1936). 
The Ketogenic Hormone of the Anterior Pituitary Gland and Fat Metabolism. 

(Royal Soc. Canada, Appendix B, 1936). 
Best, C. H., Grant. R. and Ridout, J. H. — The 'lipotropic" effect of dietary protein. 

(J. Physiol., Vol. 86, pp. 337-342, 1936). 
Best, C. H., Mawson, M. E. H., McHenry, E. W. and Ridout, J. U.—The effects of 

diets low in choline. (J. Physiol., Vol. 86, pp. 315-322, 1936). 
Best. C. H. and Ridout. J. H. — The effect of cholesterol and choline on liver fat. 

(J. Biol. Chem., Vol. IX, p. 114, 19.3'6). 
The effects of cholesterol and choline on liver fat. (J. Physiol., Vol. 86. pp. 

343-352,1936). 
Brown, M. H. — Criteria for the selection of suitable strains of B. typhosus for use in 

preparation of typhoid vaccine. (Can. Pub. Health J., Vol. 27, pp. 171-175. 

1936). 
The incidence of the bovine tubercle bacillus in lesions found in man. (Can. 

Pub. Health J., Vol. 27, pp. 88-89, 1936). 
Rapid typing of the pneumococcus (the Neufeld test). (Can. Pub. Health J.. 

Vol. 26, pp. 571-573, 1935). 
The specificity of typhoid and paratyphoid vaccines. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can.. 

Vol. XXX, Sec. V, 1936). 
Brown, M. H. and Anderson, E. A. — B. alkalescens (Andreives) — its relation to 

members of the colon-typhoid-dysenlery group. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., 

Vol. XXX,' Sec. V, 1936). 
Brown, M. H. and MacNabb, A. L. — Tentative methods for the cultivation and 

isolation of tubercle bacilli and the production of tuberculin. (A.P.H.A. 

6th Ann. Yearbook, pp. 188-192, 1935-36). 
Cameron, D. W. — Antitoxin response in vitamin C deficient guinea-pigs. (Trans. 

Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. XXX, Sec. V, 1936). 
Campbell, J. — Anterior pituitary extracts and liver fat. (Am. J. Physiol., Vol. 116, 

p. 24, 1936). 
Caulfeild, A. H. W., Brown, M. H. and Waters, E. T. — Experiments to determine 

ivhether the allergically active substance in ragiveed pollen extracts is a 

single entity or multiple. (J. Allergy, Vol. 7, pp. 1-26, 1935). 
Clarke, C. H. D. — Organisms of a malarial type in a ruffed grouse, Bonasa umbellus 

(Linne) , with a description of the schizogony of Leucocytozoon bonasae. 

(Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. XXX, Sec. V, 1936). 
Craigie, J. — The present status of the antigenic analysis of the elementary bodies of 

vaccinia. (J. Immunol., Vol. 29, pp. 70-71, 1935). 
Some problems of poliomyelitis. (Canadian Public Health Journal, Vol. 27, 

pp. 6-12, 1936). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 93 

Craigie, J. and Brandon, K. F. — Identification of the V form of B. typ/iosus. 

(Canadian Public Health Journal, Vol. 27, pp. 165-170, 1936). 
Craigie, J. and Wishart, F. 0. — The standardization of serum for the variola com- 
plement fixation test. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. XXX, Sec. V, 1936). 
Defries, R. D. and Campbell, T. C. — Determination of the protective value of anti- 
rabic vaccine iSemple) . (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. XXX, Sec. V, 1936). 
The relative pathogenicity of two strains of fixed rabies virus for white mice 
and rabbits. (Can. Pub. Health J.. Vol. 26, pp. 615-618, 1935). 
Dolman, C. E. and Kitching. J. S. — Tests for innocuity and antigenic potency of 
staphylococcus toxoid. (J. Path, and Bact., Vol. 41, pp. 137-162, 1935). 
FitzGerald. J. G. — Diphtheria prevention, methods and results. (Can. Pub. Health J., 
Vol. 27, pp. 53-60, 1936). 
The Herzstein Lectures (Stanford University and the University of California) 

March 2, 3 and 4, 1936: 
I. Precept and practice of preventive medicine. 
II. The practice of preventive medicine in the prevention and control of 

diphtheria. 
III. The practice of preventive medicine in the prevention of localized staphy- 
lococcic infections. 
Fletcher, J. P.. Best, C. H. and Solandt. 0. M. — The distribution of choline. (Bio- 

chem. J., Vol. 29, pp. 2278-22&4. 1935). 
Fraser, D. T. — De Lamar Lecture, School of Hygiene. Johns Hopkins University, 

April 28th, 1936: Diphtheria — Immunological studies in man. 
Fraser, D. T. and Halpern, K. C. — Diphtheria toxoid. (Can. Pub. Health J., Vol. 26, 
pp. 469-475, 1935). 
Serial titrations of diphtheria antitoxin following toxoid. (Ibid., Vol. 26, 

pp. 476-481, 1935). 
Studies in diphtheria immunity. (Trans. Rov. Soc. Can., Vol. XXX. Sec. V, 
1936). 
Fraser. F. H. and Madison. R. R. — Fibrinolytic titer of scarlatinal streptococcus. 

(Proc. Soc. Exper. Biol. & Med.. Vol. 33, pp. 307-309, 1935). 
McHenry. E. W. — An effect of choline upon the weights of young rats. (J. Physiol., 
' Vol. 85, pp. 343-349, 1935). 
Vitamin B\ and fat metabolism. I Trans. Rov. Soc. Can., Vol. XXX, Sec. V, 

1936). 
Vitamin B^ and fatty livers. (J. Physiol.. Vol. 86, p. 27. 1936). 
Vitamin D milk'. (Can. Pub. Health J.. Vol. 26, pp. 377-380. 1935). 
McHenry, E. W. and Graham, M. L. — Observations on the estimation of ascorbic 

acid by titration. (Biochem. J.. Vol. 29, pp. 2013-2019, 1935). ' 
McKinnon, N. E. and Ross, M. A. — The reduction of diphtheria following three 

doses of toxoid. (J.A.M.A., Vol. 105, pp. 1325-1328, 1935). 
Moloney. P. J. and Orr, M. D. — Purification of diphtheria toxoid. (Biochem. J., 

Vol. 29, pp. 1.525-1.531, 1935). 
Partridge. R. C. — Vagal and phrenic impulses and respiration. (Can. Med. Assoc. J.. 

Vol. 33. pp. 11-22. 1935). 
Phair, J. T. — Child Health and the Elementary School. I Journal of the American 

Public Health Association, May, 1936 ) . 
Plummer, H. — A serological study of haemolytic streptococci. I J. Bact.. Vol. 30, 
pp. 5-20, 1935). 
Studies in scarlet fever immunity. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can.. Vol. XXX, Sec. V, 
1936). 
Ross, M. A. — Mortality from respiratory diseases excluding tuberculosis. Ontario. 

1880-1931. (Can. Pub. Health' J., Vol. 26, pp. .5.52-565, 1935). 
Scott, D. A. and Fisher. A. VI. — The effect of zinc salts on the action of insulin. 
(J. Pharm. & Exper. Ther., Vol. .55, pp. 206-221. 19.35). 
The prolongation of insulin action by protamine and zinc. (J. Biol. Chem.. 
Vol. LXXXVIII, p. 114, 1936). 



94 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Sellers, A. H. — Accidents and the public health with particular reference to auto- 
mobile accidents. (Can. Pub. Health J.. Vol. 27. pp. 127-137. 1936). 
Mortalily in Canada 1921-1932. (Canadian Public Health Journal. Vol. 26, 

p. 619, 1935). 
Recent Trends in Mortality from Pernicious Anaemia. (Canadian Public Health 

Journal. Vol. 27. June-July, 1936 1. 
Siebenmann. C. — Metallic silver for detecting the formation of hydrogen sulphide by 

micro-organisms. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. XXX, Sec. V, 1936). 
Silverthorne. X. — Paediatrics in Europe. (Lniversitv of Toronto Medical Journal, 

Vol. XIII. pp. 42-45. 1935). 
Silverthorne. X. and Eraser. D. T. — Observations on the action of human and animal 

blood on the meningococcus. (J. Immunol., Vol. 29. pp. 523-530, 1935). 
Sneath. P. A. T. — Tetanus in ivarfare and the case for active immunization. (J. Roy. 

Army Med. Corps, Vol'. 66. pp. 311-319, 1936). 
Sneath. P. A. T. and Kerslake. E. G. — Persistence of tetanus antitoxin in man 

following active immunization. (Brit. Med. J., Vol. 2. pp. 290-291, 1935). 
\\ eld. C. B. and MacLean. D. L. — Humidity and ventilation of homes. (Health, 

Vol. 3. p. 78. 1935 I . 
Wishart. E. 0. — Virus diseases of man. (Lniversity of Toronto Medical Journal, 

Vol. XIII. pp. 117-123. 1936). 
Taylor, Miss E. M. — On nouveau milieu de culture pour la production de la toxine 

diphterique. ( Annales de ITnstitut Pasteur. October, 1935). 

EACULTY OE APPLIED SCIENCE 

Department of Chemical Engineering 

Ardagh, E. G. R. and Bowman. W. H. — The Removal of Thiophen from Benzene, 

by the Action of Acidified Hypochlorite Solutions. (Journal of the Society 

of Chemical Industry. August 9th. 1935 i . 
Boswell, M. C. and Her. R. K. — The Effect of Temperature of Preparation on Crystal 

Size and Composition of Sickel Oxide. ( Journal of the American Chemical 

Society. Mav. 19361. 



Department of Civil Engineering 

Loudon, T. R. — A discussion of the properties of the single seat plane called The Pou. 

(Canadian Aviation. May. June, 1936). 
\ oung. C. R. and Huggins. M. W. — Horizontal Thrusts for Tito-Hinged Arches 

of Various Forms. (Bulletin No. 148. School of Engineering Research, 

University of Toronto ) . 
Young. C. R. — Elementary Structural Problems. (Second Edition). (John Wiley 

and Sons. Inc.. Xew \ ork I . 
Recent Progress in Bridge Building. ( Engineering and Contract Record, 

December 25th, 1935). 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

Allcut, E. a. — Heat Insulation. (Refrigeration and Air Conditioning, June, 1935). 
The Influence of W^att's W ark on Modern Life and Industry. (Modern Power 
and Engineering. Eebruary. 1936 ( . 
Angus, R. \^ . — Kreitner's Diagram for JVater Hammer Problems. (Mechanical 
Engineering. December. 1935, Xew York ) . 
A Graphical Treatment of Pressure Variations an Hydraulic Systems. Engi- 
neering, August 9th, 1935, London ) . 
Bicentenary of James Watt. (Modern Power and Engineering, February, 1936). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 95 

Department of Metallurgical Engineering 

Montgomery, R. J. and Couch, E. G. — Control of the Temperature of Plastic Flow 
of Refractory Bodies. (Journal Canadian Ceramic Society. Vol. 5. 1936). 



ONTARIO COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

The staff of the Ontario College of Education — "The School": a magazine devoted 
to elementary and secondary education; two editions, "Elementary^' and 
"Secondary" : monthly except July and August; Vol. XXIV, September 
1935 to June 1936, pp. 1000 in each edition. (Toronto, the University of 
Toronto Press. 1935-6). 



FACULTY OF FORESTRY 

Howe. C. D. — Some Ontario Forestry Problems. ( Proceedings of the Seventv-fourth 
Annual Convention of the Ontario Educational Association). 



FACULTY OF MUSIC 

Willan. H. — Missa Brevis Nos. V and VI. (Carl Fischer, Inc.). 
Motet — Hodie, Christus natus est. ( Carl Fischer, Inc. ) . 
Benedictus es, Domine. ( H. W. Gray ) . 
Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis tvith Faux Bourdons. (Tune VII (S.S.A. ), Faitli 

Press; Tune VIII, Faith Press). 
Motets: O Saving Victim (S.A.A.) (Faith Press); Look doivn. Lord (S.A.) 

(Faith Press). 
Mass of S. Hugh (S.S.A.) (Faith Press). 
Brigg Fair {arrangement) . (Frederick Harris). 



FACULTY OF DENTISTRY 

Ante, I. H. — The Fundamental Principles. Design and Construction of Fixed and 

Partial Prosthesis. (Michigan State Dental Society Journal, August, 1935). 

Series of articles on Partial Denture Prosthesis. (Oral Health, 1936). 

Series of articles on Fixed Bridge Prosthesis. (Canadian Dental Journal, 1936). 

Cameron, G. C. — Aspesis in the Dental Office. ( Journal Canadian Dental 

Association ) . 
Cole. F. L. — Denture Service. ( The Journal of the Ontario Dental Association, 
October, 19.35). 
Common Sense of Denture Making. (Dental Magazine Hya Yaka, 1936). 



DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION AND PUBLICITY 

Dunlop, W. J. — Whose Responsibility is Adult Education? (School Progress, 

August, 1935). 
Opportunity Schools. (Canadian School Journal, October, 1935). 
That Permanent Certificate. (The School. February. 1936). 
Adult Education. (The School. March, 1936). 
Adult Education in Canada. ( Bulletin of the World Association for Adult 

Education, May, 1936). 
The Canadian Movement Towards Adult Education. ( The Journal of Adult 

Education, New York, June, 1936). 



96 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

LIBRARY SCHOOL 

Wallace, W. S. — A reader in Canadian civics. (Toronto, 1935). 
The Encyclopedia of Canada. Volumes II and III. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO QUARTERLY 

{Editor: A. S. P. Woodhouse) 

There has been during the past vear a chanse in the editorial staflf: Professor 
E. K. Brown has resumed a connection of high value to the Quarterly by becoming 
an associate editor. There has also been one innovation in policy. In the opinion 
of the editor the Quarterly was equipped to fill a pressing need in the study of 
Canadian culture and letters by supplving an annual survey of the literature, 
creative and critical, produced by Canadians. In collaboration with the associate 
editors and Miss Alison Ewart, he drew up a scheme for such a survey, and sought 
the additional aid of Professor E. K. Broadus and Mr. W. S. Milne in carrying it 
"out. The first survey, "Letters in Canada: 1935," appeared in the issue of April, 
1936. It consisted of essays on the chief divisions of literature and literary scholar- 
ship, followed by a series of bibliographies which had been collected (with con- 
spicuous success) by Miss Ewart. The welcome which the first survey has received, 
Avith the manv testimonies to its value and interest, has fully justified the experiment. 
In that experiment the Quarterly has found a distinctive work which it can do, and 
a specific service which it can render to Canadian culture, in addition to its more 
general function as a journal for the humanities in Canada. 



(14) REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION AND 

PUBLICITY 

iW. J. Dunlop. Esq., B.A., B.Paed.) 

Among the new ventures in University Extension undertaken during the session, 
1935-36, were the one week's course in Municipal Administration, suggested by the 
President, the summer course for teachers of the deaf, attended by seventy-five men 
and women, chiefly from the LTniled States, and the correspondence courses con- 
ducted for the Certified Public Accountants' Association and the Chartered Institute 
of Secretaries. 

Since this Department was organised in July, 1920, there has not been one 
session in which there have not been new developments of some kind nor has there 
been a session in which there has not been an increase in the number of adult men 
and women taking continuous courses involving serious and sustained study. 

University Extension is, of course, one phase of Adult Education and there are 
many other phases, as has been abundantly made manifest since the organisation of 
the Canadian Association for Adult Education, of which the director of this depart- 
ment has been president since its inception more than two years ago. But University 
Extension is. in many respects, the most important phase of Adult Education and it 
has been gratifying to see one or two universities in Western Canada developing 
their extension services on the same basis as that laid down here years ago. Properly 
carried on, university extension courses cover their own cost, apart probably from 
"overhead", except when instruction is provided for workingmen and women and 
for farmers, who cannot, under present conditions, be expected to pay the full cost 
of the service provided for them. 

The newest development, one which gives promise of permanence and of expan- 
sion, is the provision of courses in Public Administration. The University of Toronto 
has the honour of being first to enter this field, by co-operating for the past two 
years with the Canadian Seminar of Public Administration in Ottawa for which Dr. 
Alexander Brady has been the director and lecturer (and which was attended by 54 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 97 

men I and by providing the week's course in Municipal Administration last February 
which was attended faithfully throughout (with seven lectures given each day) by 
86 men and 4 women. Negotiations have been in progress for some months for a 
)nore pretentious course in this work in Ottawa and arrangements for a six weeks' 
summer course have been completed. 

Another new venture has been a six weeks' summer course in Short Story 
Writing under the tuition of Dean Vernon McKenzie, a distinguished graduate of 
this UniversitV: who is now Dean of the School of Journalism of the University of 
Washington. Seattle, \ears ago Dean McKenzie was the instructor of classes in 
journalism for this department and now he returns for a few weeks to the scene of 
his first teaching. Fifty-three enthusiastic students, some of them university graduates, 
are enrolled in this new course. 

Teachers' Classes, held in the evenings and on Saturdays, for those proceeding 
to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, have been attended by 603. chiefly, but not 
exclusivelv. teachers. In the Summer Session there were 378 in the Pass Course for 
Teachers. 42 in the courses for prospective specialists. 128 in the courses in Pedagogy, 
and 466 in the correspondence courses preparing for the Summer Session. Teachers 
studying Upper School subjects by correspondence numbered 129. and those taking 
commercial studies numbered 48, while there were 75 teachers of the deaf in the 
speci.al summer course. In all, 1805 teachers were served and there are 64 others, 
not teachers, working Avith the teachers toward the degree. It can now safely be 
said that no university in the Dominion provides such a complete and such a diversi- 
fied service for teachers as does the University of Toronto. And the teachers show 
their appreciation by taking advantage of the facilities, in numbers unequalled 
anywhere in Canada. 

The courses in Occupational Therapv and in Physiotherapv are growing — indeed 
are now rather beyond the limit of the clinical facilities available — and are not only 
providing new careers for competent young women but are doing a great public 
service in training therapists who, under the direction of the phvsician and surgeon, 
are able to use modern methods of treatment for the relief of sufl^ering and the 
healing of those physically and mentally ill. During the session now closing there 
have been 36 students in the former course and 34 in the latter. 

Correspondence courses for business organisations are producing good results 
in the education and training of men and women engaged in commercial pursuits. 
These organisations have their own educational charters fix their own courses of 
study, conduct their own examinations, and award their own diplomas. This depart- 
ment supplies the machinery for conducting the courses and gives advice and 
assistance when called upon. In the Canadian Credit Institute there were 72 students; 
in the Chartered Life Underwriters' Association. 125; and in the Certified Public 
Accountants' Association, 24. The work for the Chartered Institute of Secretaries 
was established but has not yet actually commenced. 

In conversation with directors of university extension in the United States some 
weeks ago it was learned that the craze for "credit" is much more pronounced in 
that country than it is in Canada. These directors were amazed when told that 
between three and four thousand men and women are eager to studv in classes 
arranged for the general public and for workingmen, bv this University, when for 
this study no credit of any kind is given, when there are no entrance requirements, 
no examinations, no certificate, diploma, nor degree. It is encouraging to find so 
many people anxious to obtain education for education's sake. Our Evening Tutorial 
Classes are always popular, the enthusiasm remains keen, the attendance does not 
noticeably fall off^ during the session; of course, the tutors are carefully chosen and 
are of the best. It is interesting to grade the subjects according to their apparent 
popularity, as follows: English diction, 241; public speaking. 227; psychology, 208; 
journalism, 198; accounting. 189; current events. 185; English literature. 168; con- 
versational French, 146; economics, 138; interior decorating, 125; parent education, 
107; modern international relations, 93; German. 74; advertising. 62; modern 



98 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

history. 56: public administration. 54: astronomy. 53: English composition, 47; 
business organisation. 45; art. 44; oral interpretation of literature. 42: mercantile 
law. 40: lip reading. 36: investments. 34; theory and practice of purchasing. 34; 
metallurgy. 26: internal combustion. 26; secretarial practice, 26; traffic and 
transportation. 23. 

The \^ orkers" Educational Association continues to flourish. L nder the title of 
Agricola Studv Clubs its work has been extended to the young people on the farms 
of Ontario: bulletins on economics, written by members of the university staff, 
have been mimeographed and distributed to members of discussion groups and to 
individuals who are really interested in study. 309 persons made use of this service 
for which a nominal fee is charged. Classes have been conducted as follows: 
Brontford (current eventsK 38: Fergus (economics). 40; Gamebridge (economics), 
25: Gait (current events I. 40; Guelph (economics I. 28; Hamilton (economics, 28; 
history. 29: hygiene. 28: journalism. 56; psychology. 67; public speaking, 37); 
Keene (economics*. 25; Kingston (economics). 23: Kitchener (economics), 30; 
London (finance. 32: physiology. 25) : Oshaiva (political science). 32; Peterborough 
(economics I. 30: Preston (economics). 25; 5/. Catharines (current events), 39; 
Stratford (history). 32; Toronto (art, 36; composition. 68; current events, 149; 
economics. 273: English literature. 44: philosophy. 32; physiology, 49; political 
science. 27: psvchologv. 208: public speaking, 60; sociology, 40; science, 39); 
Windsor ( philosophy i . 31: W oodstock (current events). 35. Though it is not 
strictly part of this report, the fact should be mentioned that the Workers" Educa- 
tional Association has obtained the co-operation ot McGill Lniversity in financing a 
class in Montreal and another in Verdun, the former having 24 students and the 
latter. 41. 

With the co-operation of the School of Nursing, two refresher courses were 
conducted, one for Hospital Staff Nurses, with an enrolment of 46, and another for 
Public Health Nurses, the enrolment being 64. 

7.142 adults did continuous study of a substantial sort under this department 
during the session, an increase of 51 over last years total. As nearly as can be 
estimated, more than 30.000 others took advantage of extension lectures and public 
lectures: this figure is a most conservative estimate. 

The members of the staff who save extension lectures this year are as follows: 
W. J. Dunlop. 52: Dr. K. H. Rogers. 24; Professor N. A. M. MacKenzie, 21; Dr. V. 
Lanee. 15: Professor F. H. Lnderhill. 11; Professor G. W. Brown, 6; Mrs. J. 
Creighton. 5: Dr. J. 0. Wilhelm. 5: Dr. P. M. Millman, 4; Professor H. J. Davis, 3; 
Dr. Norma Ford. 3: J. B. Bickersteth. 2: Arthur Lismer. 2: Professor T. F. Mc- 
llwraith. 2: C. W. Woodside. 2: Professor E. R. Arthur. 1: Professor F. C. Auld, 1; 
Dr. F. L. Barber. 1 : Professor \ . \^ . Bladen. 1 : Dr. W. E. Blatz. 1 ; Dean G. S. Brett. 
1: Dr. L. C. Coleman. 1; Mrs. J. F. Davidson. 1; Professor J. R. Dymond, 1; Sir 
Robert Falconer. 1: Professor E. Gosgio. 1: Professor G. W. Knight. 1; Professor 
E. W. Mclnnis. 1; Dr. D. C. Masters.^ 1; Dr. S. A. B. Mercer, I: Arnold Pitt. 1; 
Professor L. J. Rogers. 1; Dr. E. M. Walker^ 1. 

The total number of lectures was 175. which were distributed as follows: 
AUiston. 1: Arnprior. 1; Ayr. 1: Bowmanvillc. 3; Brampton. 12: Brantford. 1; 
Campbellville. 1: Cobourg. 1: Fairbank. 1: Fergus. 1; Gait. 1: Guelph, 4; Hamilton, 
11: Harriston. 2: Kincardine. 1: London. 6: Milton. 1: Montreal. 1; New York, 1; 
Niagara Falls. 16: North Bay. 5: Oshawa. 3: Ottawa. 3; Perth. 1: Peterborough, 4: 
Picton. 1: Port Colborne, 2: Port Credit, 1; Port Dover. 1; Port Hope, 1; Port 
Nelson, 1: Sarnia, 2; St. Catharines. 13; St. Thomas. 2: Simcoe. 1; Stratford, 2; 
Teeswater. 1: Toronto. 63; \^ hitby. 1. 

Professor J. F. Macdonalds weekly radio book-reviews were continued from 
September until the end of April. These talks receive warm recommendation, by 
letter chiefly, from persons living as far west as the Rockies and as far east as Halifax. 
In some places listening groups have been formed for discussion of the book reviews. 

The Inter-Lniversity Radio Debates were arranged as usual during January, 



INIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 99 

February, and March. I. ndergradiiales of seventeen Canadian liiiversities 
participated. The team representing the I niversily ttf Montreal was this year's 
uinner. These debates do a great deal to strengthen the good feeling existing 
among undergraduates in the various universities. The debating teams represented 
Dalhousie. St. Francis Xavier. Mount Allison. .New Brunswick. Bishop's. McGill. 
Laval. Montreal. Ottawa. Toronto. Queens. W estern Ojitario. McMaster. Manitoba. 
Saskatchewan. Alberta, and British Columbia. 

Each normal school in the Province was visited during the spring term, as 
is done every vear. and the extension facilities available, especial!) the pass course 
in arts for teachers, were outlined to the students therein. A few collegiate institutes 
and high schools were visited, on invitation, and the various courses were explained 
to the pupils. This work should be greatly developed if there were means to do so. 
The pupils in the secondary schools do not know of the many university courses 
that are open to them nor do thev know for what careers the diflerent courses are 
intended to qualify those who ct)mplete them. Personal guidance is eagerly sought. 
Many parents come with their sons and daughters for advice in choosing courses and 
such advice is gladly given — but the giving i-f it consumes an incredible amount ot 
time. 

While university publicity is inextricably bound up witii unixcrsitv extension. 
there is a separate field for the former and a wide one; of this full advantage has 
been taken. Articles have been written for and have been published by educational 
journals, general periodicals, and newspapers. The university advertising has been 
carefully placed. .News items have been supplied to newspapers throughout the 
Dominion. The radio is used for publicity as occasion requires. As the clipping 
service abundantly shows, the I niversitv is given many colunms o{ newspaper space 
each week. Through extension and publicity the I niversity supplies education and 
news; at the same time it makes thousands of friends. 

(15) REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
SOCIAL SCIENCE 

(Actirii: Director. Professor E. J. I ricick) 

Two causes have combined to make necessary a change in the conditions of 
entry to the course in Social Science. On the one hand, the standard of intelligent 
and efficient work expected of responsible social workers tends to rise, and should 
of course rise, as the field of administration in the diHercnt social services widens 
its area. On the other hand, the continued increase in the number of applicants for 
admission to the course ( nearly 60 last year ) makes difficult the task of arranging 
satisfactory practical training for students. \^ e already ask the established agencies 
to bear a heavy burden in their co-operation — always most readily given — in the 
training of our students: but there are rather strict limits to the number of learners 
for whom suitable work can be found under ;^deqiiate supervision. For these reasons 
the Committee of the Senate in charge of the course has decided that in future the 
condition of entry to the course shall be the possession of a university degree, with 
the proviso that exceptions shall be allowed in the case of men and women quali'ied 
by special experience or proved capacity in other fields. 

This change will, it is hoped, lead to improvements in the training given. In 
the field of human and social relationships and the varied problems connected with 
them the lecture method of teaching is not satisfacttirv. We hope in luture to be 
able to use. to a much greater extent, the method oi grt)up discussion and seminar 
work, combined with more ct)ntiimous field work, especially for students who (like 
the graduates from the course in sociology in our l niversity I have already spent 
some years in theoretical study. At the same time the system of apprenticing special 
students to social agencies during the second year of their course will be discontinued, 
except in the rare cases in which an agency desires a part time worker who need not 
be fully trained. 



100 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

The department again acknowledges its debt to the numerous agencies in the 
city and the Province who have ungrudgingly given their help in the practical 
training of our students. We express our particular appreciation of the increased 
assistance afforded by the Public Authorities, who are often able to offer unique 
opportunities to students desiring special experience. 

(16) REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

(Miss E. K. Russell) 

The year 1935-36 has been a difficult one for this School as it has been marked 
by increase in work together with shortage of staff and inadequacy of resources: at 
the same time there has been interesting progress that is encouraging, even while it 
puzzles us to find a way to develop quickly enough to use the opportunities that are 
presenting themselves. 

Perhaps this report should repeat that the distinctive work of this school of 
nursing is found in the undergraduate course, a three-year training in nursing that 
prepares at one and the same time for the practice of public health nursing and of 
hospital nursing. The distinctive character of this training is made possible by the 
fact that the School has its own income; that it is, therefore, independent of hospital 
support; and that, consequently, the School has freedom in the planning of the 
training course, that is, freedom with regard to content, order of arrangement, 
selection and use of staff, living and working conditions, and so on. It is curious 
that it should be so difficult to explain that this freedom is quite unique. It may be, 
however, that the time is close upon us when all schools of nursing will have to find 
a like form of organisation as independent institutions, that is, independent of hospital 
support. If that be so, it is well that a small piece of research work, such as this, 
is under way in preparation for more general change. 

As we now draw near to the end of the third year of the School's existence, the 
students of the first class to enter have not quite completed their course, so obviously 
it is too early to offer conclusions concerning this work. However there is ample 
evidence for the making of certain claims. One of these is that the work needs 
doing. There is no doubt that in general principle it is sound. Schools of nursing 
that are independent of hospital support are greatly needed, and are quite possible; 
in fact the most serious obstacle to their establishment is a bad tradition of thought. 
Sooner or later this will have to be changed: if for no other reason, the preparation 
of nurses for public health work would make it necessary. 

Our second claim is that we ought to be doing this experimental work more 
thoroughly. It would be well worth while. A slight increase in our financial 
resources would make this possible, and in the end much time and effort would be 
saved by handling the whole task more resolutely. 

We find that the other nursing schools and nursing organisations of the Province 
are looking to the School as an auxiliary institution to which they can turn for help 
in working out their immediate problems. Our help is given through special refresher 
courses for graduate nurses and the demand for these is insistent. As a school of the 
Provincial University we should be ready to give this help, so every effort must be 
made to meet the demand. 

The statistical report for the year offers the following information: 

Pupils in the 1st year of the new three-year course 11 

Pupils in the 2nd year of the new three-year course 10 

Pupils in the 3rd year of the new three-year course 7 

Nurses in the 4th year of the former four-year course in public health nursing. 

(The last class to enter that course: the new three-year course takes its place) 7 

Graduate nurses in the certificate courses 46 

Special students from other countries not enrolled in certificate courses 5 

Occasional students, including undergraduates from Toronto Hospitals 159 

Nurses enrolled in refresher courses 106 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 101 

(17) REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
MILITARY STUDIES 

(Brig.-Gen. G. S. Cartwright, C.B., C.M.G.) 

I have the honour to report as follows upon the work carried out in this 
department during the academic year 1935-36: 

The enrolment both as regards students taking this as an academic subject and 
in the special classes for the War Office examinations was satisfactory. 

During the year great interest was displayed by all taking the lectures in this 
department and the examination results were very satisfactory; especially in the 
War Office (O.T.C.) examinations in March, 1935, when the percentage of those 
obtaining "A" and "B" certificates was .85 of those who wrote, comparing very 
favourably with other universities in Canada and Great Britain. 

The possession of the O.T.C. certificate has proved to be of a practical value to 
graduates in choosing a career; for there are now a number of former students from 
this university with these qualifications who have obtained commissions in the 
Canadian Permanent Forces, the British Army, Air Force and the Indian Medical 
Service. 

As the activities of this department do not appear to be understood by many I 
wish to make a few remarks relative to the value of the studies carried on therein. 

Since the great war, Great Britain, in order to prove to other nations that her 
wish for a world peace was sincere and honest, reduced her armed forces below what 
has now been stated to be the safety limit and I think it can be claimed that her 
weakness was one of the factors leading up to the present disturbed conditions in 
Europe. The knowledge that Ethiopia was ill-equipped, possessing but few modern 
weapons and, therefore, not prepared to put up a strong resistance against the 
Italian up-to-date army, undoubtedly encouraged Mussolini to launch his attack on 
that country. All the above tends to indicate that unless a universal and well- 
balanced disarmament can be agreed upon and carried out by all nations, any one 
country weakening its defensive power below certain limits, tends to encourage war 
and not peace. 

Mr. Stanley Baldwin, in addressing the British House of Commons, in support 
of the new loan for increased armaments, pointed out that although he considered it 
a terrible thing to say, it was necessary in order to check aggressor nations for the 
others to be much more ready for war than they are to-dav. 

The more war is understood, the more all will strive to find a way to prevent it 
and the ignorance of war and what it means is a case where little knowledge leads 
to trouble and those who read and understand military history and military science 
as a general rule will prove to be the best advocates for peace. 

For these reasons it is thought that enrolment in the Department of Military 
Studies is worth while for all students desirous of understanding the problems of 
peace and war and thus equipping themselves to advance sound, well-balanced 
arguments in support of world peace. 



L 



]02 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

(18) REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES (MEN) 

{George D. Porter, M.B., Director) 

1935-36 

I. 

The report for the year shows that there have been 

Examinations 

First year s-tudents 830 

Second " " 647 

Senior " " 251 

— 1728 
Re-examined by Specialists 14 

Total 1742 

This does not include the O.C.E. students as in previous years, thus accounting 
for the smaller number explained. 

Results 

Those found fit for physical training 94% 

Those having some disability requiring corrective or light exercises 4% 

Those unfit for physical training 2% 

Twenty-four (24) students were exempted for the following causes: 

Heart trouble 7 Injur)' to spine 1 

Infantile paralysis 2 Tuberculous Knee 1 

Operations 3 Chest trouble 4 

Diabetes 1 Nephritis 1 

Peripheral Neuritis 1 Fracture 1 

Otitis Media 1 Anaemia 1 

We are pleased to report that no cases of Venereal disease have come under our 
observation this vear. The average height of this year's freshmen is 5' 834" and the 
average weight 1421/2 lbs., the same as those of last year. 

Improvement in the physical condition of second year students is shown in the 
maioritv of cases. Thirty per cent, of those below category A.l. in their first year 
had their rating raised during the year, while only six per cent, in all categories had 
their rating lowered. These latter were lowered owing to illness or accident during 
the year. 

One hundred and thirty-five students were enrolled in the special classes under 
Mr. Martin, for the correction of such defects as round shoulders, flat feet, and 
spinal curvature. 

Some of these were enrolled for the full year, and others for periods of from 
one to six weeks on account of injuries or disabilities, and those recovering from 
illness, which prevented their taking the regular P.T. 

This class was under the charge of the late Mr. Donald Barton, for sixteen 
years, and he did splendid and faithful work during that time. He was always most 
considerate and efficient, and his absence will be felt by all those who have been 
associated with him during the past years. 

Apart from our perennial epidemics of influenza, and a few cases of Scarlet 
fever and Measles, the general health of the student body has been excellent. 

During the year, the usual large number of students came in for treatment of 
minor injuries received on the campus and in the gymnasium, and also for personal 
advice on health matters. 

Dr. Charles Gossage was appointed during the year, by the Athletic Directorate, 
to attend to emergencies arising in the gymnasium and upon the campus: his hours 
are from five to six-thirty o'clock, when these accidents are most liable to occur. 
This is a much needed, and greatly appreciated service for the students. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



103 



The following are causes of absence from physical training classes for periods 
varying from one day to three months: 



Colds 258 

Influenza 48 

Sore throat 32 

Tonsillitis 4 

Bronchitis 4 

Chicken pox 1 

German measles 11 



Scarlet fever . . 

Sinusitis 

Lumbago 

Enteritis 

Vaccination . . . . 
Local infections 
Athletes foot . . 

Eczema 

Furunculosis . . . 
Psoriasil 



2 
1 
2 
2 
3 
6 
3 
1 
9 
1 

388 



Heart trouble 2 

Adenitis 1 

Appendicitis 1 

Choroiditis 2 

Gastralgia 2 

Otitis media 2 

Nephritis 1 

Conjunctivitis 2 

Dental trouble 6 

Transfusions 3 

Injuries: 

Fractures 2 

Dislocations 3 

Sprains 67 

Cuts 12 

Abrasions 14 

Blisters 10 

Operations 13 



Total. 



.531 



143 



This year lectures on Personal Hygiene and First-Aid were given to first year 
students, by the Director of Health Service. Our Acting Gymnasium Director, Mr. 
Martin, made a request to the Athletic Association for these lectures to be held as 
part of the Physical Training Course, which was granted. 

Regarding these lectures, "Varsity" reported that, "Wide-interest was evidenced 
by undergraduates, when they crowded the lecture room to capacity on the occasion 
of every address." 



II. 



(18) REPORT OF MEDICAL ADVISER OF WOMEN 
{Dr. Edith Gordon) 



I beg to submit the following report of the Medical Adviser of Women for the 
year 1935-1936. 

The health of the women generally throughout the vear has been excellent. 
WTiile the Easter term brought several cases of Scarlet Fever, Measles, and Mumps, 
there was less absence from classes because of colds and minor indispositions. The 
physical condition of the entering students was particularly good. 

Physical Examinations: There were 512 physical examinations. Of these 186 
were first year students in University College, Household Science, Medicine, Applied 
Science and Dentistry. The rest were Arts students in the other years of University 
College, in Victoria, Trinity and St. Michael's Colleges, and students from the various 
departments of Public Health Nursing. Social Science. Occupational and Physio- 
therapy, Graduates. Ontario College of Education and Library School. 

For the past three years, the physical examination has included an intercu- 
taneous tuberculin test, and for the past two years those students who give a positive 
test, have been requested to have an X-ray of the chest taken. In this way it is hoped 
that an early diagnosis of tuberculosis may be made, if it is present. Several students 
have been under supervision all year because of a historv of contact with an open 
case of tuberculosis, or because of suspicious findings in the X-ray. No frank case 
of tuberculosis has been discovered. 346 I.C. tests were made. Of these 55.5% were 
positive and 44.5% were negative. 

Throughout the year 20 re-examinations were made on students whose condition 
was not wholly satisfactory on entrance, and whom it was felt needed rechecking at 
a later date. 



104 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

All women participating in sports are required to have a physical examination 
before playing the game they have elected. 156 such examinations were made. 

Many students return each year for a physical examination in order to discover 
their physical status from year to year. An effort was made to have the graduating 
year report for a final check-up in February, and those who responded to the invi- 
tation felt that they had received something worthwhile. It is hoped that this 
examining of the graduating class in the Easter term may become an accepted fact. 
Valuable information could be obtained if this were enforced for the whole class. 

Consultalions: Again large numbers of students have availed themselves of the 
opportunities to consult with the Medical Adviser of Women. It is almost impossible 
to keep a complete record of all who call daily, but it is estimated that more than 
two thousand calls were made in the past year. These are for advice and treatment. 
It is gratifying to note that students from every faculty and department come into 
the Medical Office, and show a deep appreciation of the service rendered there. This 
individual health education, and care of minor ailments, brings the Medical Adviser 
into close touch with large numbers of the women students. By it frequently serious 
illness is avoided and greater physical efficiency is assured. 51 vaccinations were 
performed, and a considerable number of Shick and Dick tests were done, and 
following them the administration of toxoid and scarlet fever toxin was made in the 
susceptible individuals. 2 Urinalyses were made. The taking of the Haemoglobin 
is part of the routine physical examination, but complete blood counts are done 
where it is thought necessary. 

Lectures: A course of 25 lectures in Personal Hygiene and First Aid was given 
to the first year students in the course in Physical Education. A group of four 
lectures was given in March to the students in the one year course in Public Health 
Nursing. Three talks on Personal Hygiene were given in the fall to the entering 
students. Miss Coventry very kindly made the necessary arrangements for these 
talks which were given in the Household Science Building. 

Rest Rooms: The rest rooms were used regularly by the students who were 
substituting rest periods for the usual physical training classes on the advice of the 
Medical Adviser. They were also used occasionally by other students who were 
recovering from illness, and were excused from physical training for a week or two. 
In addition, many of the students found an occasional hour's rest helped them meet 
a heavy day's program, and were glad to have a quiet spot in which to relax. Through 
the rest rooms the Medical Adviser can keep in touch with students who most need 
care and supervision, and who might not otherwise come in contact with her. 

During the final examinations the Medical Office was taxed to its maximum 
capacity in caring for students who through illness needed special help at that 
difficult time. 72 different students wrote one or more examinations in the Medical 
Office, and 184 papers were written under the supervision of the Medical Adviser. 
This service relieves the presiding officers in the examination halls of a difficult 
problem, and probably prevents complete breakdowns in some cases. 

The Medical Office for women continues to co-operate with the department of 
gynaecology in a piece of research work. This opportunity is much appreciated by 
the Medical Adviser. Gratifying results have been recorded in many cases under 
observation and treatment. 

Anthropometric studies have been continued, and it is hoped that the coming 
year may see this work very much enlarged. 

Needs: The physical needs of the women students can only be met adequately 
in a building sufficiently large and properly equipped for developing their physical 
potentialities through directed physical training, competitive sports and recreational 
opportunities. It is hoped that the day when this will be available for them is close 
at hand. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 105 

Physical Examinations, 19351936 

University College (entering students) 147 

University College (others ) 66 

Victoria College 14 

Trinity College 19 

St. Michael's College 16 

Household Science (entering students) 27 

Household Science (others ) 1 

Medicine (entering students) 10 

Medicine (others) 5 

Applied Science 1 

Dentistry 1 

Public Health Nursing (entering three year course) 11 

Public Health Nursing (others) 41 

Ontario College of Education and Library School 74 

Social Science 26 

Occupational Therapy 3 

Physwtherapy 5 

Graduate Studies 8 

Miscellaneous (Art, Music, Occasional ) 4 

Total 479 

Margaret Eaton School 33 

Total Examinations 512 

Students required to take physical training, first year University 

College, Medicine, Household Science, Applied Science and Dentistry- 186 

Grades Al and A2 — physically able to participate in the gymnastic and 

athletic activities 91% 

Grade Bl — needing special corrective work 6% 

Grade B2 and C — excused from physical training requirement because 

of some temporary or permanent physical handicap 3% 



(18) REPORT ON ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL TRAINING 
{T. A. Reed. Secretary, Athletic Association) 



IIL 



The work of the dep?rtment was handicapped shortly after the opening of the 
season when Mr. Donald M. Barton, our head gymnasium instructor, was stricken 
with an illness that terminated fatally on November 3rd. Appointed to the position 
on the resumption of organised activities after the close of the war, he had been in 
charge of the gymnasium and corrective work for sixteen years. Quiet, unassuming 
and modest, he had an influence far-reaching and of unquestionable good to the many 
thousands of students who passed through his hands and his special aptitude for the 
proper correction of disabilities made him a most valuable officer to co-operate with 
Dr. Porter in his work. His loss has been greatly felt. For the current session the 
work was reorganised under Mr. W. H. Martin and Mr. J. E. McCutcheon with the 
assistance of Charles Zwygard, a gymnast of outstanding ability. 

Compulsory Physical Training: 

Under this heading the work followed the usual programme, viz.. Danish 
gymnastics, elementary apparatus and mat work and exercises on the horse and mats. 
The usual options were allowed, viz., ia) participation in competitive sports in the 
several interf acuity series, and, (6) enrolment in the Canadian Officers Training 
Corps. As far as possible first year men were urged to join the Life Saving and 
Learn-to-Swim classes for which they were granted Physical Training credits. 



]06 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Men students enrolled in the first and second years 1795 

From third and fourth years ( being deficient in previous years) 15 

From Wycliffe College 1 

1811 
From this total must be deducted those: 

(a) With credit for two years physical training but repeating academic work 239 

( b ) Exempt on medical and other grounds 18 

(c) Withdrawn from college during the session or registration cancelled 28 

285 

1526 
These 1526 elected to take their Physical Training as follows: 

In Physical Training classes 1181 

In the Canadian Officers' Training Corps 177 

In the Corrective classes 90 

In the following Intercollegiate & Interfaculty sports (part time) : 

Rugby Football 158 

Soccer Football 37 

Track 31 

English Rugby 9 

Basketball 130 

Hockey H* 

Indoor Baseball 92 

Boxing. Wrestling & Fencing 115 

Swimming and Water Polo 62 

Gymnastics 22 

Lacrosse '♦O 

Volleyball -• • • • 57 

Rowing 4 

Jui Jitsu 3 

Failed to register in Physical Training 51 

2373 
Less duplications 847 

1526 
General Physical Training: 

This work was carried on with Mr W. H. Martin in temporary charge following 
the death of Mr. Barton, assisted by Messrs. J. E. McCutcheon, Chas. Zwygard and 
W. W. Winterburn. There were forty-four compulsory physical training classes held 
each week which included special periods for corrective work for those who had 
certain physical deficiencies. 

In the various branches of athletics the following were enrolled: 

Class Enrolled Weekly Periods 

Boxing 48 5 

Wrestling 64 5 

Fencing 45 5 

Gymnastics 35 3 

Track: Outdoor 67 5 

Indoor 42 2 

Basketball 316 45 

Indnor Baseball 252 21 

Volley Ball 225 24 

Lacrosse 130 21 

Life Saving 382 13 . 

Water Polo: 

Interfaculty 100 18 

Intercollegiate 30 3 

Swimmine: 

Interfaculty 116 10 

Intercollegiate 35 3 

It is interesting to note the addition of a new activity, namelv Jui Jitsu. Classes 
were organised by two Trinity students, Rev. P. Y. Kurose and Rev. T. Matsumoto 
These two gentlemen hold the championship in Jui Jitsu known as the "Black Belt" 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 107 

Altogether thirty-four men wished to register but on account of the novelty of the 
work it was decided to reduce the group after the Christmas vacation to thirteen 
pupils. Instruction was also given in Japanese fencing, with the assistance of S. 
Shimizu. and members of the class gave performances at the Alumni Night in Hart 
House, at Eaton's Young Men's Club and at Trinity College School, Port Hope. 

Two hundred and four students enrolled in the Learn-to-Swim classes and three 
hundred and eighty-two in the Life-Saving classes. Of the latter one hundred and 
ninety-four received the award of the Royal Life Saving Society. 

Mr. Martin in co-operation with Dr. Porter organised lectures on personal 
hygiene, artificial respiration and resuscitation. These were largely attended, the 
students being given credit for attendances at the three lectures. There was an 
average attendance of five hundred at each lecture. 

Intercollegiate Athletics: 

The University of Toronto entered teams in all competitions, winn-ing the 
championships in the following: — Soccer, Intermediate Tennis, Senior Harrier, 
Intermediate Track, English Rugby, Intermediate Basketball, Gymnastics and Inter- 
mediate Swimming. In Rugby the Varsity Senior team, under the excellent coaching 
of Mr. Warren Stevens, was undefeated until the Intercollegiate playoff on November 
16th when Queen's won the Yates Cup after a bitter contest on our field. Mr. 
Stevens also coached the Senior Basketball team and Mr. McCutcheon the Inter- 
mediate and Junior Basketball teams. Altogether twenty-five teams represented the 
University of Toronto, two hundred and ninety-four contestants wearing the university 
colours. Of these thirty-two took part in more than one activity. 

Inter faculty Athletics: 

The subjoined schedule shows the continued interest on the part of the students 
in competition for the various Cups therein named. Over one thousand players 
participated. Victoria College won the Mulock Cup presented by our Chancellor, 
Sir William Mulock, in 1894. This College was also successful in winning the Arts 

Faculty Cup for Soccer and the Jennings Cup for Hockey. The Medical Faculty 
won the larger number of interfaculty contests, namely in Basketball, Indoor 
Baseball, Gymnastics and Volleyball. 

Inter- 
faculty 

Series Name of Cup Winner Teams Players 

Rugby Sir Wm. Mulock Vic. 11 275 

Track W. L. Rowell Memorial U.C. 56 

Soccer Arts Faculty Vic. 9 145 

Harrier J. Brotherton O.A.C. 32 

Hockey \^ T. Jennings Vic. 14 186 

Basketball Clifford Sif ton Jr. Meds. 19 228 

Lacrosse Dr. W. A. Dafoe O.C.E. 11 116 

Boxing. T^rest. & Fencing. . Francis Davison O.A.C. 59 

Indoor Baseball A. G. Spalding & Co. Jr. Meds. 16 234 

Swimming A. M. Fitzgerald Trin, 38 

Water Polo H. P. Eckardt Sr. S.P.S. 8 104 

Indoor Track Toronto Cricket Club Trin. 43 

Tennis F. Y. McEachren W. P. Pigott. Ap.Sc. I 48 

Gymnastics H. A. Wilson Meds. 12 

Volleyball Victoria College Staff Jr. Meds. 16 186 

1762 
Less duplications 716 

Number of contestants 1046 

The trophy presented last year in memory of the late John C. H. Copp, a student 
whose example both on the playing field and in other university activities will not 
soon be forgotten, was this year awarded to E. A. (Gus) Greco, who, by his team 
mates, was adjudged the worthiest in the current year. Other members of our Senior 
Rugby team distinguished themselves in academics, namely: M. F. (Turney ) Williams 



k 



108 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

who received the John C. Copp Memorial Scholarship award for 1935-36, and C. C. 
I Cam) Gray who received the award for 1936-37. A former member of the Rugby 
team, 0. M. Solandt, distinguished himself in the final year of Medicine by winning 
no less than six scholarships and the Gold Medal. 

In conjunction with the Medical Health Service the Athletic Directorate recom- 
mended to the Board of Governors an extension of the emergency surgical service on 
account of the large number of students taking part in competitive athletics and 
gvmnastics. In order that prompt attention could be given for minor injuries and 
first aid in more serious cases arrangements were made whereby Dr. Charles D. 
Gossage was in attendance in the late afternoons and early evenings to supplement 
the work under Dr. Porter's direction. The experiment has proved so successful 
that it is hoped that it will be further developed in the near future. 

Our Arena was again placed at the disposal of the Promenade Symphony 
Concerts for the summer of 1935. the number of concerts being increased from 
sixteen to twenty-three. Altogether over one hundred thousand people listened to 
admirable programmes conducted by Mr. Reginald Stewart at popular prices, the 
proceeds being divided equally among the one hundred players participating. It is 
a matter of pride that the University can thus contribute to the artistic life of the 
City and to the general public good by the use of such a building for purposes other 
than those originally intended. 

The season now closing marks the retirement of one who has been closely 
associated with universitv and intercollegiate athletics for the past twenty-one years. 
Professor Michael A. Mackenzie was appointed by the President as Faculty Repre- 
sentative on the Athletic Directorate in 1915. For twenty-one years he has been a 
member and for sixteen years he has filled the office of President of the Athletic 
Directorate and for a similar number of vears has been the University of Toronto's 
permanent representative on the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union. His 
influence has been wide spread, his judgment has been keen and fair and he has done 
more to solidify intercollegiate good-will than any other factor since the war. The 
esteem in which he has been held by the sister universities has been a potent factor 
in cementing the bonds of friendship. 

The Athletic Directorate: 

The Athletic Directorate for 1935-36 consisted of Dr. J. A. McCollum 
(President), Professor M. A. Mackenzie, Professor J. F. Macdonald, Dr. W. Easson 
Brown. Messrs. J. H. MacPherson. (Vice-President), F. P. Mclnnis, J. R. Coulter, 
H. R. Marks, W. A. McCatty, H. B. Squires, and, ex officio. Dr. G. D. Porter, Medical 
Director, Warren Stevens, Athletic Director, and T. A. Reed, Financial Secretary. 

(18) DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN STUDENTS 

iMiss I. G. Coventry. Director of Physical Education) 
IV. 

During the session 1935-36 there were 227 students enrolled in the physical 
education classes and approximately 770 class periods of instruction were given by 
the physical director and her assistant. Miss J. M. Forster. 

Required Physical Training: The required physical training class with an 
enrolment of 189 students was subdivided into 20 class periods a week. This plan 
assisted principally in accommodating the students who presented various academic 
time-tables and also lessened the congestion on the gymnasium floor in the inadequate 
gymnasium quarters. 

Students from University College 163 

" " Faculty of Medicine 12 

" " Applied Science 1 

" " Household Science 11 

" " Faculty of Dentistry 1 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 109 



Corrective and Remedial Classes: Class periods of corrective and remedial 
gymnastics Avere given to students who were medically advised to take the special 
course arranged for their welfare. This essential part of physical training was 
under the personal supervision of the physical director. Marked improvement was 
noted and reported to the medical office at the end of the session. 

Four Year Diploma Course in Physical Education in conjunction with the pass 
arts course: There were 12 students registered in this course and approximately 686 
periods of instructions and lectures were given. Theory subjects and lectures num- 
bered 290 and practice subjects 396. 

The decrease in the number of students attending the course is due to the revision 
which now requires a higher scholastic standing and includes additional hours of 
class periods and lectures. 

It is still interesting to note that the women graduates who have been granted 
diplomas in physical education by the University of Toronto are still in continued 
demand as full time physical directors in collegiates. technical, and high schools, in 
Toronto and other cities in Ontario. 

Swimming: There were 226 students from all colleges, faculties and depart- 
ments and approximately 363 periods of instruction were given by Mr. A. L. 
Cochrane and Miss A. Cochrane during the session of seven months. 

Students from University College 79 

" "■ Victoria " 43 

" ■■ Trinity " 13 

" St. Michael's " 8 

" ■■ Faculty of Medicine 12 

" ■' Household Science 5 

■' " Occupational Therapy 1 

" ■■ Social Science 7 

" " School of Nursing 21 

Administrative Staff 39 

Dental Nurses 6 



(18) REPORT ON ATHLETICS FOR WOMEN 

{Miss A. E. M. Parkes. B.A.) 
V. 

During the session 1935-36, the Women's Athletic Association sponsored 
intercollegiate competition in basketball, tennis and swimming and interfaculty 
competition in the above three sports as well as hockey, badminton, golf and indoor 
baseball. Students taking part in one or more of the activities of the Association 
were registered in University. Victoria, Trinity and St. Michael's Colleges, the 
Faculty of Medicine, the School of Nursing and the Department of Social Science, 
Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy. 

As in previous years, the expenses of interfaculty competition was borne in the 
main by the college and faculty associations, and of intercollegiate competition by 
the university association. To make this possible, in addition to the amount earned 
by the students at their Parking Stations during football games, contributions were 
made by the men's Athletic Association and the Lniversitv College Women's Under- 
graduate Association. The use of the Arena for hockey practice and of the Hart 
House gymnasium and pool for certain events was also generouslv permitted bv the 
men's Association. 

The intercollegiate tennis championship returned to Toronto this year, with 
Miss Claire Walsh, Victoria I, winning the title. The basketball was won by the 
University of Western Ontario. The first women's intercollegiate swimming meet 
was held at McMaster in February, with teams from Macdonald Hall. Guelph. and 
Toronto competing with the home team. Toronto, with a team of six. won a first 
and second in each event. Although no intercollegiate hockev was played, the 



110 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

University entered a team in the Toronto Hockey League senior series and won the 
championship. 

The interf acuity record is as follows: 

Series Cup Winner Competitors 

Tennis Curlette Cup Victoria 36 ( 6 teams ) 

Basketball St. Hilda's Cup St. Hilda's 135 (11 teams) 

Hockey Harston Cup University College 65 ( 5 teams) 

Swimming Interfaculty Cup University College 30 ( 6 teams ) 

Badminton U.C. W.U.A. Cup St. Hilda's 36 ( 6 teams) 

Baseball University College Cup Victoria 30 ( 3 teams) 

The Athletic Directorate for 19-3.5-36 was made up as follows: Dr. C. C. Benson. 
President, Mrs. W. A. Kirkwood. Mrs. W. B. Elsley. Dr. E, M. Gordon, and the 
Misses J. M. Forster, E. M. Ardagh. J. B. Atkinson. M. Cowan, J. F. Davey, M. E. 
Dignam. J. E. Leitch and A. E. M. Parkes, Financial Secretary. 

( 19 1 REPORT OF THE WARDEN OF HART HOUSE 
(/. B. Bickersteth, Esq.. M.C., M.A.) 

General 

The total membership of Hart House during the past year was four thousand 
four hundred and forty-one of whom three thousand seven hundred and ninety-six 
were undergraduates and six hundred and forty-five were senior members. These 
figures compared with those of 1934-193-5 show a diminution of about fifty under- 
graduates. The number of men using the Great Hall was very much larger than 
last vear and the total number of meals served in Hart House from 1st July 1935 
to 30th June 1936 shows an increase of 29 per cent, over that of the previous twelve 
months. /Vmong the undergraduates the 20c. lunch was the most popular meal and 
the changes introduced in January 1935 evidently appealed to the student body in 
general. It is unlikely, however, that circumstances will permit the serving of meals 
at this verv low rate to continue. The committees themselves realise this and are 
making plans to introduce a slightly higher scale of prices. Early in February owing 
to the generosity of the Massey Foundation three hundred and fifty specially designed 
chairs were installed in the Great Hall. These chairs are not only both durable and 
comfortable, but are also in keeping with the dignity of the Hall. During the winter 
the experiment of serving hot coffee in the shop was tried and has proved highly 
successful. During part of July and August Hart House was used by the French- 
Canadian teachers attending the summer school arranged bv the Quebec Government, 
meals being served in the Great Hall throughout the period of the course. In 
Tanuary the Kinsr's death resulted in the cancellation of the C.O.T.C. ball. Instead 
of the Athletic At-Home a dinner was held at the end of March in the Great Hall. 
Another innovation was the so-called Alumni Night on 20th March. On this occasion 
when there were many athletic and swimming events, music bv the Hart House Glee 
Club, an exhibition of graduate paintings in the art gallerv, bridge, dancing and 
other entertainment the entire building was put at the disposal of the Alumni 
Federation. About 2300 people were present and the whole evening was an unquali- 
fied success. The committees of Hart House were delighted to be of assistance to 
the graduates by making Hart House available for this purpose. With these excep- 
tions the usual social functions were held during the winter, though the character of 
the so-called stunt nights was greatly improved by requiring all acting to take place 
in the Theatre. Efforts were made to develop closer relation between undergraduates 
and the University Settlement and a larger number of men and boys of the Settlement 
than ever before were entertained at the annual Christmas party. The Warden's 
Christmas dinner was held on the last night of term in December and again showed 
to what an extent the University draws its students from all over the world. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 111 



At the end of September a simple but dignified memorial plaque to Mr. Henry 
Sproatt was erected in the hallway near the main entrance to Hart House. The final 
words of the memorial are "His skill as a master of the Gothic form is woven into 
the fabric of this House"'. The cost was met partly from the funds of Hart House 
and partly by the Massey Foundation. 

On his appointment as High Commissioner in London the Board of Stewards 
sent a resolution to the Hon. Vincent Vlassey congratulating Mrs. Massey and himself 
and emphasising the great contribution the Massey Foundation had made to academic 
life by the creation of Hart House. 

Music 

Under the able direction of Mr. Charles Peaker the Hart House Glee Club have 
made outstanding progress during the past year as was shown by their Friday 
Afternoon Recital before Christmas and their Sunday Evening Concert on 1st March. 
On the latter occasion the Great Hall was packed and the Glee Club received an 
ovation. In view of the excellence of these performances the Glee Club have again 
been permitted to bear the name of Hart House and it is confidently expected that 
future vears will see this organisation become one of the outstanding features in the 
musical life of the University. The usual series of Sunday Evening Concerts was 
held in the Great Hall one of the most interesting being that given by the Con- 
servatorv String Quartet when half the programme was played on 17th century viols 
and half on modern instruments. In September Hart House through the generosity 
of a few friends was able to obtain complete control of this fine consort of viols 
which up till then had been jointly owned. The Friday Recitals began at the end 
of October and continued till the end of Februarv. The Songsters and the Midda^ 
Sing Songs were held as usual. To Mr. Campbell Mclnnes. VTr. Ross Workman and 
to all the musicians of Toronto Hart House owes an incalculable debt. This year 
the experiment was tried of introducing light but good music into the east common- 
room on certain days at the lunch hour and was suflSciently encouraging to justify its 
continuance next year. 

Art 

The arts and crafts room has now completed its second year of existence. The 
standard of the work shown at the annual exhibition in the print room, consisting of 
sculpture, lino cuts, etchings and wood carving, was a tribute to the instructor, 
Mr. Carl Schaefer. 

The series of exhibitions held in the art gallerv throughout the winter attracted 
wide interest. The artists were as follows: Arthur Heniing. the Canadian Society of 
Painters in Water-Color. Arthur Lismer. the late Robert Holmes. Emily Carr. the 
late Harold VIcCrea, Gordon Webber and Mr. and VIrs. George Pepper with a group 
of artists who had been working in Quebec. There were also exhibitions of textile 
designs and of Rembrandt reproductions. The photographic show arranged by the 
Camera Committee in January was as popular as ever and the exhibition of work bv 
undergraduates, though not drawing on as many students as in previous vears. and 
the display of work by faculty and graduate members were both of considerable 
interest. The Art Committee arranged a series of exhibitions in the print room 
when reproductions of 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th century masters were shown and 
prints were always on display in the cabinet designed for that purpose. Before 
Christmas Professor John Alford kindly gave a series of four informal lectures on 
certain of the old masters and in the New \ear on three successive \^ ednesdavs Mr. 
Peter Haworth spoke on the crafts. In January Mr. Alec Miller, the well-known 
sculptor in wood, gave a lecture on the history of sculpture illustrating his remarks 
with examples of his own work. The Art Classes under the direction of Mr. H. S. 
Palmer were again held every Thursday night from October to February. Owing to 
the generosity and goodwill of each successive Graduating Year and with the help 
of the Murray and Harold Wrong Memorial Fund and other small sources of 



112 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

revenue several pictures have been added during the past year to the Hart House 
collection, namelv. "Saguenay River" by C. F. Comfort, "Mist, Rocky Mountains" 
by F. M. Bell-Smith. "Memory's Melodies" by W. J. Wood, "Dark Girl" by Prudence 
Heward and "Howe Sound" by W. J. Phillips. That Hart House has already 
acquired a collection of some importance is proved by the fact that eight pictures 
were borrowed for a special exhibition of Canadian work arranged by the National 
Gallery at Ottawa. Much time and thought have been given to the problem of main- 
taining the collection in good repair and all artists concerned have been asked to 
fill up a form giving technical information about their pictures. Several volumes 
have been added to the small art library in the gallery. 

Library 

The experiment of holding two "Library Evenings" in 1934-1935 proved so 
encouraging that during the past winter three such evenings were arranged and on 
each occasion there was an average attendance of forty to fifty undergraduates, 
smoking being allowed in the library. The speakers were Mr. J. V. McAree, Mr. 
Morley Callaghan and Professor A. T. DeLury. The first two spoke on their leisure 
reading and the latter on Irish literature. The address was in each case followed by 
a discussion. In January Mr. D. A. Sinclair who has done excellent work as curator 
wished, on reaching his final year, to be relieved of his duties. Mr. W. B. Wood 
(I L.C.) was appointed as his successor. The committee have done their best with 
the funds at their disposal to keep the library up to date and have added about one 
hundred new volumes. The problem of the removal of books from the room was 
somewhat serious during the earlier part of the year, but the checking in May 
showed a net loss of only four volumes which in view of the fact that there is no 
definite supervision of the library may be considered as very satisfactory. Several 
exhibitions of private press books have been arranged in the special display case. 
The committee have also maintained a representative selection of periodicals in the 
reading-room where a rack was installed to hold all magazines and reviews. 

Debates 

The usual number of debates were held and it is interesting to record that 
among the members of parliament at Ottawa are now to be found some who as 
undergraduates were active in debates at Hart House. The resolutions dealt with 
Italy and sanctions, a vote of confidence in His Majesty's Government at Ottawa, 
the intrusion of professors into politics and Quebec nationalism. Major C. G. Power, 
Minister of Pensions and National Health, was an hon. visitor at the last debate 
and took part in the discussion. At the November debate two undergraduates from 
British Columbia and Saskatchewan were hon. visitors. In April two Australian 
debaters stayed in Hart House, but owing to the proximity of examinations at that 
time of year no debate was possible. At the February debate carefully worded 
resolutions were passed conveying the condolence of the House to Her Majesty 
Queen Mary on the death of His Majesty King George V and a tribute of loyalty to 
His Majesty King Edward VIII. It was pointed out that the King, as Prince of 
Wales, had on several occasions visited Hart House and that he had presented a 
signed portrait of himself which hangs over the Speaker's chair. A reply to the 
resolutions was subsequently received from Lord Wigram thanking the House for 
their two resolutions, stating that His Majesty has the happiest memories of his visits 
to Hart House which date back over a period of seventeen years and assuring Hart 
House that he will always follow its fortunes with a keen and personal interest. 

Student Christian Movement 

The September Conference at Lake Couchiching was attended by one hundred 
and seventy-six students from Canadian universities and in the fall other week-end 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 113 



conferences were held. Ehiring the Christmas vacation ninety-five undergraduates 
attended the Twelfth Quadrennial Convention of the Student Volunteer Movement. 
From time to time prominent religious leaders such as Dr. \^ ilson Cash. Dr. J. H. 
Oldham. Dr. T. Z. Koo. Dr. Samuel Zwemer. Dr. Peter .Manniche and Dr. Sherwood 
Eddv have addressed the students. The holding of a series of after luncheon meetings 
in the music room when short addresses were given by members of the universilv 
staff and others was a successful experiment. Holy Communion was celebrated 
monthly in Hart House Chapel with an excellent attendance and during Holy \^ eek 
services were held there. In the spring various changes were made in the organisa- 
tion of the S.C.M. which it is hoped will result in greater efficiency. The Rev. \^'ilfred 
Lockhart has completed his first year as General Secretary of the S.C.M. and has 
carried out a difficult task with success. 

Theatre 

Six plavs were produced under the direction of Mrs. Nancy Pyper as follows: 
October "Once in a Lifetime": November "Hounded by Hate": December "\^ appin" 
Wharf"; Januarv "The Power of Darkness": February three one-act plays: April 
"Judgment Dav". During the last week in March the Central Ontario Drama 
Festival took place in the theatre. Many plays were produced by the college dramatic 
societies and this year the presentation of "The Inspector General" by the Lniversity 
Drama Committee marked the first attempt for some years to combine undergraduate 
talent for a representative university play. \^ ith the full support of the college 
dramatic groups and faculty members the committee hope to establish a permanent 
society for the coordination of university dramatic work. 

In the absence of Mr. \ incent Massey in London Mr. Eric Haldenby took over 
the Chairmanship of the Board of Syndics. 

Visitors 

Among visitors to Hart House during the past vear mav be named Mr. W. M. 
Goodenough i Barclays Bank i . Archbishop J. C. McGuigan. the Dean of Canterbury. 
Major-General Andrew McNaughton. Mr. E. Salter Davies and a group of prominent 
directors of education from Great Britain. Mr. Paul Robeson. Mr. Carl ^Iilles (the 
famous sculptor i . Miss Ruth Draper. Sir Arthur \^ illert. Mr. Christopher Hollis. 
Canon Leonard Hodgson. Mr. Philip Chester. Mr. Allan \^ ade. Professor Ralph 
Fowler, the Hon. Ian Mackenzie, the Hon. C. G. Power. Mr. J. A. C. Osborne ( Bank 
of England i and Dr. Raymond Priestley I Vice-Chancellor of the L niversitv of 
Melbourne ) . 

Committees 

On his retirement from the Lniversity this year Professor Michael Mackenzie 
has relinquished the Chairmanship of the Finance Committee of Hart House, a 
position he has occupied for sixteen years. During this important formative period 
Professor Mackenzie has not only put at the disposal of Hart House his wide 
experience and sound judgment as an expert in finance and administration but has 
interested himself in every effort Hart House has made to be of service to its members 
and to the Lniversity as a whole. His loss will be severely felt but hanpilv his 
retirement from the Finance Committee does not mean his severance from the life of 
Hart House with which it is hoped he will long continue to be associated. Dr. V. E. 
Henderson has consented to succeed Professor Mackenzie as Chairman and Hart 
House is fortunate in securing the services of one who has been for so many vears 
closely connected with its administration and to whom it already owes so much. 
Professor George Glazebrook has also retired this year from the Chairmanship of the 
Hall Committee and Hart House is deeply grateful to him for the long hours and 
good judgment he has given to the affairs of the Great Hall during the past six vears. 
Not only the permanent staff but the undergraduates as a whole are deeply sensible 



114 



REPORT OF THE No. 12 



of the debt thev owe to all senior members, both faculty and graduate, who at 
considerable sacrifice devote much time and thought to the various committees of 
the House. 

(201 REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE CONNAUGHT LABORATORIES 

(/. G. FitzGerald. M.D., LL.D.) 

This is the twenty-second annual report of the Director of the Connaught 
Laboratories and consists of a survey of changes, progress and advancement during 
1935-1936 in research, public service and collaboration with other organisations 

and agencies. 

The Director of the Laboratories is the executive officer of the Committee of the 
Governors which is responsible to the University for the formulation of policies and 
<jeneral conduct of the Connaught Laboratories. The Chairman of the Committee 
from 1915 to 1935 was Colonel Sir Albert E. Gooderham, whose death in April of 
last year is recalled with deep regret. To fill the vacancy thus created, the Hon. and 
Rev. H. J. Cody. President of the University, was appointed by the Board. T. A. 
Russell, Esq.. LL.D.. Vice-Chairman of the Committee who acted as Chairman tem- 
porarily after the death of Sir Albert Gooderham. continues as Vice-Chairman, and 
His Honour Dr. Herbert A. Bruce, Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario, 
was made a member of the Committee in the place and stead of Sir Albert Gooder- 
ham. Other members of the Committee at present are Mr. F. Gordon Osier and 
Mr. Balmer Neilly. 

The functions of the Laboratories are research in the domain of preventive 
medicine and the pursuance of medical public-service. Within the framework of 
this responsibility the Director has the collaboration of three associate and two 
assistant directors and a comptroller. The associate directors are immediately 
responsible for and have supervision of members of the staff in the sections of 
filterable viruses, bacteriology and immunology generally, and physiology and bio- 
chemistry. One assistant director has oversight of undertakings in chemistry in 
relation to immunology, as well as the production of diphtheria prophylactics. The 
other assistant director is in charge of the farm section of the Laboratories. The 
comptroller is responsible to the director for business administration, sales, services 
and liaison with the members of the scientific staff both those who are responsible 
for routine production and with those concerned solely with investigation and 
research. Since director, associate and assistant directors are also members of the 
academic staff of the University, teaching is a major responsibility. The newly 
established Western Division is in charge of a research member who is also an 
associate professor in the University of British Columbia and director of the 
Laboratories of the Provincial Board of Health of that province. 

Primarilv Connaught Laboratories serve the Dominion of Canada. In the dis- 
tribution of biological products, however, their constituency is much more extensive. 
The list of countries included will be found elsewhere in this report where production 
and distribution are dealt with in greater detail. Ideally, future developments of 
Connaught Laboratories should be so planned that there may be. at least in this 
Dominion, a certain measure of decentralisation. It is suggested, in other words, 
that research and production should be carried on not only in this University but 
also in others with which collaborative arrangements may be made. Reference to 
such a development in the Universitv of British Columbia received preliminary notice 
last year. It is a distinct pleasure at this time to report that the organisation of the 
Western Division has not only been wholly justified during its brief period of 
existence but is worthy of immediate expansion and extension. Such must be pro- 
vided for, indeed, in the immediate future, if a quite unique opportunity in the 
Province of British Columbia is to be fully embraced. In the years to come Eastern 
Canada as well must receive appropriate consideration. If before the close of a 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 115 



quarter of centurv of service to the people of this country Connaught Laboratories, 
from its centre and divisions, reaches from the Atlantic to the Pacific, a fine founda- 
tion will have been laid. Growth in numbers of staff and increase in scientific 
productivitv as well as expanding routine production, while doubtless desirable 
objectives, will however not suffice as substitutes for leadership in the domain of 
investigation and the extension of the boundaries of natural knowledge. Those 
objectives must alwavs be kept clearly in view as the primary purposes of the 
organisation now and in the years to come. 

Specific preventive medicine or applied immunology is concerned with 
strengthening the forces of resistance of the individual in order that he may the 
better ward off the attacks of the causative agents of communicable diseases. This is 
one of the major fields of public health. In consequence, the campaigns directed 
against the ravages of diphtheria, scarlet fever, whooping cough, pneumonia, menin- 
gitis, smallpox, etc.. have been waged. That there are other even more powerful, 
more ubiquitous and, upon occasion, vastly more devastating foes, has long been 
realised. Among such mav be mentioned influenza and the common cold. Progress 
in the elucidation of knowledge respecting these enemies of mankind is being made. 
Plans have been developed in these Laboratories to provide staff and facilities for 
energetic prosecution of research into the etiology and specific prevention of influenza 
and the common cold. To participate in this activity Dr. Ronald Hare, at present a 
whole-time worker in the service of the Medical Research Council of Great Britain 
and detailed for duty at the Bernhard Baron Research Unit at Queen Charlotte's 
Hospital, London, will become a member of the staff of these Laboratories. Dr 
Hare has made important contributions to knowledge in the field of bacteriology and 
will be warmly welcomed. Dr. Geoffrey Rake of the scientific staff of the Rockefellet 
Institute for Medical Research, a graduate of the L ni\ ersity of London ( Guy's 
Hospital Medical School ) . well known for his work, most recentlv, on meningococcic 
meningitis and experimental pneumonia, will, it is a pleasure to report, also come 
this year to Connaught Laboratories as a research associate. Dr. Hare will, it is. 
anticipated, work in the Lniversity and Dr. Rake in the farm section of the 
Laboratories. 

Reference, more specific and detailed, to the investigations conducted in various 
divisions of the Laboratories, will now be made. In the section of filterable viruses, 
epidemiology and medical statistics, under the direction of Professor R. D. Defries, 
further satisfactory progress has been made. Certain lines of enquiry have been 
followed as in previous years. Considering first the virus work, the studies have 
been concerned primarily with those of rabies and vaccinia. These two are respon- 
sible for hydrophobia or rabies, a disease still verv prevalent in many parts of the 
world, afflicting both man and lower animals, and smallpox, a morbid condition of 
which human beings only are the victims. As disease entities both have long been 
known. Lntil very recently nothing was known as to their etiology, even less as to 
how they were spread and perpetuated themselves, but curiously enough a great deal 
of knowledge of a practical character is available as to their specific prevention. 
Por that knowledge we are indebted chiefly to Edward Jenner and to Pasteur. Precise 
and exact information, however, as to the mechanism both of infection and immunity 
li'as been lacking. Dr. James Craigie and Dr. F. 0. Wishart have carried further 
iheir enquiries into serological and immunological aspects of vaccinia and variola 
virus infections in monkeys and rabbits chiefly. The element in these viruses which 
stimulates the appearance of antibodies, protective and other, is exceedinglv complex. 
The antigens are almost certainly multiple and one of these, the so-called LS antigen 
which predominates in the in vitro reactions, has been more carefullv defined. It 
has been found to consist of heat labile and heat resistant elements. Each of these 
is capable of producing antibodies upon injection. Methods for preparing pure L 
or pure S antisera have been developed. The soluble precipitable substances of 
both variola and vaccinia have been shown to be the same LS antigen. The 
substances in immune sera which neutralise these two antigenic elements do so. 



116 REPORT OF THE No. 12 



apparently, through two separate and distinct reactions because of the presence of 
two neutralising antibodies. Additional antigens are apparently present in these 
viruses and preliminary evidence suggests that they are apparently restricted to 
infective elementary antibodies. These antigens are being studied further. An 
improved technique for the variola complement fixation reaction has also been 
evolved by Dr. Craigie and Dr. Wishart. Dr. Defries has continued his work of 
exploring the possibilities of assaying the protective value of anti-rabic vaccines. 
White mice have been used for the purpose. A strain of rabies virus carried for 
years in rabbits has shown enhanced pathogenicity in mice when injected intra- 
muscularly. Both mouse protection tests and virus neutralisation activities of 
immune sera have been resorted to in the assay of the relative prophylactic values of 
a number of anti-rabic vaccines. 

Utilising cultures obtained by Dr. Kenneth F. Brandon in field studies of 
outbreaks of enteric infections, Dr. Craigie and Dr. Brandon have obtained bac- 
teriophages for B. typhosus. One of them has been found to have a specific affinity 
for the V agglutinogen which is present only in the V form or phase of that species. 
More than 450 freshly isolated strains of B. typhosus have been examined and all 
were found to be V forms with the exception of a few infected with V bacteriophage. 
Antigenic degradation of the V form of the micro-organism is induced by the phage 
similar to that which occurs after cultivation in vitro on laboratory media. These 
observations have immediate practical application in a laboratory method for rapid 
identification of B. typhosus from human cases or carriers and also to satisfy the 
requirements in the selection of pure V forms of B. typhosus used in the preparation 
of homologous bacterial vaccines. 

Dr. Brandon has undertaken four epidemiological field studies in conjunction 
with officers of the Provincial Bureau of Health of Quebec and of the Department of 
Health Ontario, an excellent illustration of a function to which reference has already 
been made, namely collaboration with other organisations, in these instances with 
the two largest provincial health departments. The epidemic in the first instance 
was one of enteric fever in a general hospital in Montreal. This was found to be 
due to B. paratyphosus A. It is of especial interest because this is the first occasion 
upon which that species of micro-organism has been so incriminated. An outbreak 
of epidemic jaundice in a rural community in Ontario was also explored. Useful 
information respecting mode of transmission and the period of incubation of the 
disease was obtained. A very unusual and puzzling outbreak in an Ontario residen- 
tial instituion was studied by Dr. Brandon in which fourteen cases of erythema 
nodosum were found. All had been exposed to an open case of tuberculosis. All of 
them, too, gave strongly positive reactions to intracutaneous injections of tuberculin. 
Careful clinical, pathological, radiological as well as epidemiological enquiry made 
it appear that this was an epidemic of the childhood or primary type of tuberculosis. 
One of the individuals involved who was found to be negative to tuberculin one 
month before, became tuberculin positive after suffering an attack of erythema 
nodosum. Another enteric outbreak in Ontario also investigated by Dr. Brandon 
was found to be due to B. paratyphosus B. Sixteen persons were infected by drinking 
polluted water from a well while attending an exhibition in the western part of the 
province. Dr. Brandon in conjunction with members of the Health Department, 
Brantford, Ontario, investigated the Schick test reaction of a group of children who 
several years previously had been vaccinated against diphtheria. With Dr. D. T. 
Fraser a study of Schick test toxins distributed by various manufacturers was com- 
pleted and important observations made upon them. 

Epidemiological and statistical investigations have been carried on also by Dr. 
N. E. McKinnon and Dr. Mary Ross. The results which have followed the large- 
scale employment of toxoid during a period of eight years has been continued by 
the inclusion of 1934 results and the compilation of results for the entire period. 
Dr. Ross has also analysed the records of a series of more than 5000 Schick test 
results. These were made available through the courtesy of Dr. Grant Fleming of 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 117 

McGill University, and represented the results obtained in immunisation clinics in 
Montreal. 

Dr. Ross and Dr. A. H. Sellers in a study of mortality from cardio-vascular- 
renal diseases in Ontario for the period 1909-1934 have made excellent progress and 
preliminary results have alreadv been presented. Dr. Ross and Dr. Brandon have 
made a statistical investigation of measles with especial reference to duration of 
illness and complications. Dr. Sellers has, himself, and in collaboration with Dr. 
J. T. Phair of the Department of Health. Ontario, made further progress in enquiries 
into the causes of maternal mortality; and with Dr. Ansley has studied the causes of 
foetal deaths. Other statistical investigations by Eh:. Sellers have had to do with 
mortality from diabetes in the Province of Ontario; deaths from accidental causes; 
and compilation of essential facts relating to pernicious anaemia in Canada generally 
and in the Province of Ontario. 

In the section of bacteriology and immunology under the direction of Professor 
Donald Fraser a varied and important programme of investigation and research has 
been carried on. Dr. Fraser has extended his own investigations of the amount and 
distribution of antitoxin produced in a group of children in response to the injection 
of diphtheria toxoid. Titrations of antitoxin have been completed at intervals of 
three, six and nine months. This enquiry has already elicited the important fact 
that in a group of 244 children given three doses of toxoid only one did not respond 
with a measurable amount of antitoxin. It has been learned also that the antitoxin 
level drops gradually from the third month onward. The duration of protection will 
also be ascertained. This study has been, because of its comprehensive character, 
exceedingly laborious and time-consuming. When completed, however, it should 
establish for the first time in human beings a suitable standard or criterion for 
ascertaining the efficacy of diphtheria antigens. Dr. Alan E. Young and Miss Halpern 
have assisted Dr. Fraser in this very important work. With Dr. Young and Dr. Mary 
Ross, Dr. Fraser has been exploring the question of the duration of artificially 
acquired diphtheria immunity as measured by the Schick test in a large group of 
school children. It has been determined that from 15 to 20 per cent of such children 
lose their antitoxic immunity in from four to five years. If they are given one extra 
dose of toxoid, however, nearly 99 per cent will once again become immune. Dr. 
Eraser's pioneer and very significant studies of the comparative response in children 
to three doses of toxoid and one dose of alum toxoid have been extended to two 
years after immunisation. The numbers are of necessity limited but the results are 
striking and entirely consistent with those published last year. A studv of maternally 
transmitted diphtheria antitoxin has been resumed. A group of children given two 
doses of alum precipitated diphtheria toxoid dissolved in tartrate solution are having 
antitoxin assays made after an interval of one year. 

In collaboration with Dr. Moffat of the Department of Public Health, Toronto, 
and Dr. Grant Fleming of McGill University, a diphtheria carrier survey is being 
made. Thus far the carrier rate in both cities has been found to be surprisingly 
low. Estimations of diphtheria antitoxin content of the blood of such carriers is also 
being made. Other studies of antitoxin content of persons under observation for 
many years past are being continued. Occult diphtheria immunity appears to be 
more durable than that artificially acquired. With Dr. Martel of Amos, P.Q., the 
antitoxin response to two doses of high Lf toxoid is being followed. The study being 
carried on at W'estern Reserve University, Cleveland, with Dr. J. A. Doull. continues. 

Dr. M. H. Brown with Miss E. A. Anderson has made a careful study of the 
significance of the presence of B. alkalescens in the intestinal flora of 157 persons. 
They found that this species of micro-organism occurs in a great variety of gastro- 
intestinal conditions and is essentially non-pathogenic. Taxonomically B. alkalescens 
is related to the species of bacteria in the dysentery group. Studies of cases of 
infectious diarrhoea made by Dr. Brown and Miss Anderson have revealed the 
presence of B. dispar and the absence of all other significant species suggests that 
this micro-organism may play an etiological role. Studies of the antigenic efficacy 



118 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

of typhoid vaccines have been made by Dr. Brown. He has investigated the pro- 
phylactic value in white mice of such vaccines when made from carefully selected 
strains of B. typhosus whose antigenic integrity had been maintained; in other 
words, those consisting entirely of "V" forms of the micro-organism. With such, 
the bactericidal power, phagocytic index and agglutinative litre of the blood of 
individuals, carefully selected, is being made. Two groups, normal and vaccinated, 
are to be studied and compared. The keeping properties of typhoid vaccine and 
the specificity of typhoid-paratyphoid vaccine have also been re-examined by Dr. 
Brown, who has found a remarkable specificity in the response in mice to injection 
of these vaccines made from closely related species. An examination of the results 
of specific serum therapy in lobar pneumonia at Toronto Western Hospital has been 
conducted by Dr. Brown in association with Dr. George Anglin. Forty-three patients 
with Type I pneumococcus infections given serum had a case-fatality rate of 23 per 
cent. In twenty-four cases of the same type not serum treated 41 per cent died. 
Fifteen Type H cases who were given serum all recovered. Dr. Brown and Miss 
Anderson have also continued their studies of pneumococci isolated from patients 
in the Hospital for Sick Children. To the present 500 strains have been obtained. 
The Neufeld method of sputum typing is now being employed to the exclusion of all 
others. With Dr. Caulfeild Dr. Brown has investigated the sensitising properties of 
alum precipitated ragweed pollen. This will be referred to in greater detail else- 
where. Negative results have been obtained in an investigation of the effect of cortin 
on hemolysin production in rabbits. Finally, Dr. Brown has determined the effect 
of pH upon the keeping qualities of diluted tuberculin. 

Dr. J. S. Kitching, who has been given responsibility for the staphylococcus 
work in these Laboratories, has made a number of important and interesting additions 
to existing knowledge. Tests of toxigenic capacity of more than 60 recently isolated 
strains of staphylococci have given confirmatory evidence of the preliminary finding, 
namely that the ability to develop toxin, in vitro, measured by hemolysin production 
and combining power, does not correspond with severity of infection. The production 
of single-strain toxoids for human use has been continued and has yielded satisfactory 
results. One strain especially has occasioned very few untoward local or general 
reactions. The assessment of antigenic capacity of staphylococcus toxoids in human 
beings has been continued. The appearance of "rough" variants in strains of 
staphylococci cultured in certain media has been noted. Even dried cultures have 
in certain instances manifested this tendency to antigenic degradation. 

With Dr. Kitching, Dr. Leone Farrell has conducted an enquiry into the effect 
of variation in the concentration of formaldehyde upon the rate of detoxification of 
staphylococcus toxin, the effect on combining power and upon antigenicity. Dr. 
Farrell has developed a method of assessing the amount of free formaldehyde in 
toxoids. A very careful and thorough investigation of staphylococcal immunity in 
rabbits and mice has been made by Dr. Farrell and Dr. Kitching. Active immunisa- 
tion of these animals with staphylococcus toxoid enhanced resistance against lethal 
effect of staphylococci and staphylotoxin introduced parenterally, also against the 
dernonecrotic action of staphylotoxin. Formalinised staphylococcus vaccine pro- 
duced little or no antixtoxin and no increase in resistance to lethal effect in rabbits 
of this micro-organism or its toxin. Serum of rabbits treated with staphylococcus 
vaccines did not confer passive immunity against staphylococci in rabbits or mice. 
Staphylococcus antitoxin was found to be specific in conferring passive immunity 
against lethal effect of staphylococci and staphylotoxin and the degree of protection 
conferred was proportional to the amount of antitoxin given. A series of horses are 
being immunised with four different staphylococcus antigens. Dr. Kitching has 
investigated the staphylococcus antitoxin titre of more than 800 persons. These 
have been obtained, largely, from individuals suffering from acute and chronic 
staphylococcus infections. Then too. Dr. Kitching has followed the increase in 
natural antitoxic immunity occurring in patients suffering from acute osteomyelitis. 
In 350 cases of varying ages Dr. Kitching has endeavoured to ascertain the average 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 119 

staphylococcus antitoxin content of the blood. There did not appear to be signifi- 
cant difFerences in concentration in persons in various age groups. The staphylo- 
coccus antitoxin of maternal and cord blood has been determined. Dr. Kitching has 
also investigated the antitoxin of various groups of human beings and of several 
species of animals. Dr. Farrell has studied the stability and antigenicity of diluted 
staphylococcus toxoid. Comparative immunising value of unmodified, alum precipi- 
tated and alum tartrate staphylococcus toxoid is being investigated by Dr. Farrell, 
who is also engaged in a chemical study of various fractions of staphylococcus toxin. 

Dr. P. A. T. Sneath has continued his studies of tetanus toxoid in human beings 
and in guinea-pigs. Very interesting results have been obtained and it has been 
established that an exceedingly useful new antigen and weapon against tetanus has 
been made available. Dr. Sneath also followed the variations in tetanus antitoxin 
content of the blood of persons previously given toxoid. 

Another very useful service rendered by Connaught Laboratories mav here be 
referred to since Dr. Sneath is responsible for its conduct. For several years past 
an immunisation clinic established in the Hygiene Building has been available to 
students in the University. There the Schick test, Dick test and tuberculin test have 
been undertaken. Students have also been given the following antigens: diphtheria 
toxoid (alum precipitated and unmodified), scarlet fever toxin (formalinised and 
unmodified ) , scarlet fever antitoxin, staphylococcus toxoid, tetanus toxoid, typhoid 
and T.A.B. vaccines, vaccine virus, etc. The number of persons attending the clinic 
increased from 275 in 1934-35 to 741 in 1935-36. In addition, students in the D.P.H. 
and Public Health Nursing classes attended on various occasions for immunisations, 
etc. 

Dr. Frieda Fraser and Dr. Helen Plummer have collaborated in the study of 
various streptococcus problems. As for many years past they have been especially 
concerned with the study of strains of streptococci isolated from cases of scarlet fever, 
puerperal fever, septic sore throat, generalised infection, etc. It has been ascertained 
that those strains of streptococci giving rise to human disease belong chiefly to the 
so-called precipitin Group A type of L?ncefield. For purposes of identification 
of toxigenic strains from both scarlatinal and non-scarlatinal sources this fact is of 
major importance. There was found to be a significantly smaller portion of strains 
of streptococci from throats of normal persons capable of elaborating toxin. Among 
215 strains of streptococci tested by Dr. Plummer and Dr. Fraser, the toxin elaborated 
by all of them could be neutralised by two antitoxins, no less than 85 per cent by 
antitoxin resulting from the injection of horses with toxin produced by the strain of 
streptococcus known as N.Y. 5; 8 per cent by the "Smith" strain; and 3 per cent by 
a mixture of the two. In deciding upon the strains to be employed in antitoxin 
production these facts are of material value. Dr. Plummer has explored the strepto- 
coccus antitoxin content of human blood of Canadian and of tropical origin. A 
comparison of the content of antitoxin in maternal and cord blood has also been 
made by Dr. Plummer. Doctors Frieda Fraser, Plummer and L. N. Silverthorne 
have estimated the antitoxin content of the blood of patients suffering from strepto 
coccal infections and receiving serum. A study of the antitoxin content of persons 
who were found to be Dick positive before, during and after immunisation, and of 
pupil nurses at the inception and close of training and before and after immunisation, 
has been made by Dr. Plummer and Dr. Fraser. A serological and cultural study 
of more than 100 strains of streptococci from the points of view of pigment produc- 
tion in relation to classification bv precipitin groups and of classification accordin;.. 
to precipitin types in Group "B" has engaged Dr. Plummer's attention. Dr. Fraser 
has studied the fibrinolytic titres of strains of streptococci in relation to the severity 
of chnicil infections (in association with Dr. R. R. Madison of Stanford University). 
Dr. Fraser, Dr. Plummer and Dr. Alan Young have co-operated in an epidemiological 
study of strains of streptococci isolated from children at the Preventorium. Some 
were from cases of scarlet fever, others from contacts both among staff and patients. 

Dr. Caulfeild with Dr. M. H. Brown and Dr. E. T. Waters of the department of 



120 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

physiology has made important observations in studies in allergy. Guinea-pigs have 
been sensitised to ragweed pollen extracts with great regularity when the extracts 
were submitted to preliminary precipitation by potassium alum. Brief reference has 
already been made to this exceedingly interesting and significant advance made by 
Dr. Caulfeild, Dr. Brown and Dr. Waters. The study of the influence of ragweed 
carbohydrate on the reaction ( itself a matter of moment I has been reopened with 
most promising and interesting preliminary results. The serum content of skin 
sensitising antibody ( reagin I in the blood of a number of persons sensitive to 
ragweed (who constitute a very large portion of so-called "hay-fever" patients I has 
been estimated. Thus far the results have not indicated that those persons who have 
a high content of sensistising antibody in the blood are especially likely to be free 
from symptoms of hay fever. Guinea-pigs have been utilised in the further study of 
skin sensitising antibody. Serum obtained from a highly sensitive guinea-pig has, 
by means of the Prausnitz-Kiister procedure, been shown to possess a skin sensitising 
antibody analogous to that demonstrable in the serum of a sensitive human being. 
Studies of the behaviour of antigen and antibody injected intradermally in various 
proportions have been made and antibody activity under appropriate conditions has 
been observed to disappear. Chemical studies of various ragweed fractions have 
been initiated and the early clinical findings employing diff^erent fractions have 
yielded most intriguing results. 

Dr. L. N. Silverthorne whose services are devoted to the Hospital for Sick 
Children as well as to Connaught Laboratories has made a number of exceedingly 
valuable contributions during the year. The bactericidal power of human and 
guinea-pig blood upon meningococci has been further investigated. In conjunction 
with Dr. Donald Eraser quantitative differences in the bactericidal power of blood 
from different individuals have been demonstrated. A considerable number ot 
normal healthy persons examined over a period of years have been found to harbour 
njeningococci in the naso-pharynx. Among 63 such persons from whom 1227 naso- 
pharyngeal swabs with secretion were taken and examined at regular intervals for 
two years, 19 per cent were found to contain meningococci. The blood of these 
individuals was examined to determine its bactericidal power. The strains of menin- 
gococci isolated were tested to demonstrate the invasive power of the blood and with 
the aid of the "mouse-mucin" test could be classified as "virulent" or "avirulent". 
Carriers of the meningococcus possess bactericidal substance in the blood whether 
the strains which they harbour in the naso-pharynx are "virulent" or "avirulent". 
Blood from carriers has been found to possess bactericidal properties against some 
"virulent" cerebro-spinal fluid strains of meningococci. These observations are of 
great theoretical and practical importance. Dr. Silverthorne has also continued his 
studies of other phases of the problem of meningococcus meningitis. Active immun- 
isation against whooping cough has occupied the attention of Dr. Silverthorne and 
Dr. Eraser. A study of influenzal meningitis and a novel method of serum treatment 
of the disease has been developed by Dr. Silverthorne. 

Most profitable and fruitful collaboration between members of the staff of 
Connaught Laboratories and of the Hospital for Sick Children, the Department of 
Public Health, Toronto, Riverdale Isolation Hospital, the Department of Health, 
Ontario, Toronto General Hospital, McGill University and various other organ- 
isations and instituions, has made possible much of the work in the section of 
bacteriology and immunology under the direction of Dr. Donald Eraser. This co- 
operation is deeply appreciated and acknowledged with gratitude. No less than 
fourteen scientific communications were published during the year by members of 
this section of the Laboratories. 

The section of physiology and biochemistry has again been in charge of 
Professor C. H. Best. Exceedingly important investigations have been conducted 
during the year by Dr. Best and his co-workers and a number of communications 
were presented both at the International Physiological Congress at Leningrad in 
August 1935 and at the meetings of societies in the American Eederation for Experi- 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 121 

mental Biology (including the American Physiological Society, the American Bio- 
chemical Society and others) in Washington in March 1936. Dr. Best and Miss 
Ridout have presented the further results of their studies on choline and liver fat 
in a series of papers. The importance of choline in human and animal metabolism 
is receiving ever-increasing recognition. Dr. E. W. McHenry has shown that the 
addition of vitamin Bi to a low choline diet fed to young rats brings about a marked 
increase in the fat content of the livers. He has also investigated the sparing action 
of vitamin Bi on fats. Dr. McHenry has studied, too. the time required for the 
production of fattv livers and the relation of the fat content of the diet to the 
deposition of fat in the liver. Dr. Best with Mr. J. Campbell in studies of the 
relation of the anterior pituitary gland to fat metabolism has endeavoured to estab- 
lish a quantitative test for the active material. Rats, mice, guinea-pigs and chickens 
have all been investigated and the reaction in mice gives promise of providing a 
rapid, useful test. The hormone has been investigated in elucidating the effect of 
extracts on ketosis. liver fat. body fat and kidney fat. Definite differences between 
the liver fat response of male and female animals have been shown to exist. Dr. 
D. L. MacLean has made histological studies on fat absorption with and without 
choline in the diet and in various other conditions. With Dr. McHenry, Miss Gavin 
has investigated several methods of animal assay of liver extracts. Dr. R. F. 
Farquharson and Dr. J. A. Dauphinee of the departments of medicine and therapeutics 
have given most helpful co-operation in this work and the thanks and appreciation 
of Connaughl Laboratories are hereby extended to them and to Professor Duncan 
Graham, physician-in-chief to the Toronto General Hospital, for courtesies shown. 
Dr. McHenry and Dr. R. A. Cleghorn of the department of medicine have collaborated 
in further studies of cortin. Glycine has been supplied to the Toronto General 
Hospital for the study of its effect in myasthenia gravis. Dr. McHenry has prepared 
a testicular powder for study in the treatment of prostatic conditions by Dr. Robin 
Pearse and members of his staff at the Toronto General Hospital. Under Dr. 
McHenry, Mr. Reedman has investigated the ascorbic acid content of blood and 
urine in patients at the Hospital for Sick Children. Other studies of vitamin C have 
also been made. Dr. MacLean has studied various problems in lighting and ventila- 
tion; with Dr. H. H. Burnham he has observed the effect of various ventilatory 
conditions on the nasal mucosa: and with Dr. H. M. Barrett he has investigated the 
toxic effects of chemicals used in the cleaning industry. 

Dr. D. A. Scott and his associate Dr. A. M. Fisher, in the course of their work 
directed to obtaining an insulin compound which would manifest a prolonged hvpo- 
glycaemic effect, have made very important advances. These workers had already 
shown that insulin solutions to which small amounts of zinc were added, retarded 
the onset of hypoglycaemia and prolonged insulin action. Hagedorn and his co- 
workers in Copenhagen subsequently demonstrated that suspensions of insulin and 
protamine produced a sustained lowering of blood sugar in diabetic patients. Various 
protamine preparations were made by Dr. Fisher and investigated by Dr. Scott and 
Dr. Fisher. Satisfactory preparations of protamine insulin have been made for 
clinical trials. Dr. Scott, knowing that insulin readily combined with zinc and that 
this metal forms complex salts with amines, postulated that zinc or some other 
metal might be a factor in the formation of suitable protamine insulin suspensions. 
Employing protamine and insulin of low ash content, only a slight prolongation of 
insulin action was observed. If, however, these same mixtures were taken and a 
trace of zinc added to them, they then produced, when injected, very prolonged 
hypoglycaemia. Spermine isolated from beef pancreas mixed with insulin con- 
taining a trace of zinc prolonged the hypoglycaemic action of insulin in dogs. These 
results of Dr. Scott and Dr. Fisher mark another important advance in insulin 
therapy and shed further light on the mechanism of insulin action. To Dr. W. A. 
Clemens and Dr. Mottley of the Pacific Biological Station at Nanaimo, B.C., warm 
thanks are extended for assistance in obtaining supplies of salmon milt from which 
protamine was prepared. 



122 REPORT OF THE No- 12 

Dr. A. Charles and Dr. Scott have devised methods for the further purification 
of heparin. Dr. Barrett has investigated the toxicity of trichlorethylene and carbon 
tetrachloride. He has also continued his determinations of atmospheric pollution. 
Dr. Barrett has also devised a most ingenious and delicate apparatus for the prepara- 
tion and analysis of deuterium-containing fats. Mr. K. K. Kay has completed and 
standardised in absolute energy units a spectroradiometer for the study of the 
absolute spectral intensity of any radiant energy source. By this means the anti- 
rachitic potency of such sources may be evaluated. Mr. Kay has also studied by 
means of spectroradiometer the transmission of smoky atmospheres for ultra-violet 
radiation. The reduction of ultra-violet radiation of antirachitic potency by smoky 
atmospheres has been determined both by biological assay and by the spectro- 
radiometer. The results of the biological assay have been obtained in absolute units 
and are therefore universally comparable. This is a signal advance. Eighteen papers 
have been published during the year by Dr. Best and his colleagues. 

Professor P. J. Moloney, Dr. E. M. Taylor, Mr. M. D. Orr and Dr. M. D. Smith 
in the section of chemistry in relation to immunology have made valuable contribu- 
tions to both theoretical and routine activities of the Laboratories during the current 
year. Dr. Moloney and Dr. Taylor with Dr. K. F. Brandon have investigated very 
thoroughly fourteen Schick test toxins, determining combining power and toxicity 
in guinea-pigs. The criteria were those of the Permanent Commission on Biological 
Standardisation of the Health Organisation of the League of Nations. Employing 
the same toxins. Dr. Brandon has carried out a large series of tests in human beings. 
The results obtained in humans and guinea-pigs suggest that the present international 
standard for the Schick test might be improved by a change in toxicity and com- 
bining power requirements. Experiments have been undertaken to determine suitable 
conditions under which stable solutions of fresh toxin mixed with toxoid could be 
prepared, of which the level of toxicity and combining power could be fixed at will. 
Further work on toxin broth is being carried on to ascertain, if possible, whether 
variation in toxin production from hog's stomach autolysate is due to variations in 
the culture employed or in the constituents of the medium. Complete detoxification 
of toxin produced in this medium proceeds very slowly in the presence of formalin. 
The time required may be lessened by the dilution of the toxin or dilution of the 
broth prior to seeding. Dr. M. D. Smith has carefully studied a number of analytical 
methods with a view to improving accuracy and technique. Dr. Smith has also 
continued her study of the heat labile detoxifying action of bile on diphtheria toxin. 
Mr. M. D. Orr has investigated the stability of diphtheria toxoid in the presence of 
a variety of physical and chemical agents. Toxoid was found to be relatively stable 
in the presence of a high concentration of acid. This fact has made it feasible to 
further purify toxoid. Various toxoid complexes have been prepared and studied by 
Mr. Orr. 

In the farm section under Professor N. E. McKinnon research activities have 
been prosecuted with great vigour and with most gratifying results. Investigation of 
various problems of fundamental interest have been carried to completion during 
the year. Dr. Donald Cameron has enquired into the influence of certain elements 
of the diet on immunity in guinea-pigs. He has shown that the antitoxin response 
following injection of diphtheria toxoid is definitely depressed in animals in a state 
of inanition due to vitamin C deficiency. Dr. Charles Siebenmann has continued his 
studies of the refractometric and chemical changes in culture medium during the 
growth of C. diphtheriae, with especial reference to physical conditions influencing 
toxin production. Observations on the relationship of toxin concentration to growth, 
determined gravimetrically, of protein to growth and to toxin concentration, of Lf 
units to toxicity, have been classified and published, as has a paper on the influence 
of aeration and diffusion on toxin formation. Dr. Siebenmann has also made exceed- 
ingly interesting observations on the detection of H2S in various bacterial cultures 
by means of silver foil. He has explored, too, the influence of maltose and glucose 
on H2S production. Using the Moloney-Taylor medium quite fundamental work has 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 123 

been done in this field by Dr. Siebenmann. He has extended also his study of 
proteins in sera by refractometric methods. The technique developed is being applied 
also to observations of the plasma of horses undergoing immunisation. Other 
problems engaging Dr. Siebenmann's attention are methods and routes of immunisa- 
tion of horses in the production of tetanus antitoxin; and the isolation of fractions 
of C. diphtheriae. The separation of a carbohydrate fraction has been completed. 

Dr. R. C. French has studied the distribution of the various antitoxins in their 
respective plasmas. Methods for the further purification of antitoxin have also 
been examined. An investigation of the chemical changes in the blood of horses 
undergoing immunisation has also been undertaken by Dr. French. He has enquired 
into the antitoxin response to antigens in varying amounts, large and small, primary 
and secondary to similar doses in large and small volume. This has been done in 
received further consideration. Dr. Kerslake has studied the blood and urine of 
horses and guinea-pigs. The addition of adjuvants such as CaCl2 to antigens has 
normal horses and of those under treatment. He has also continued his survey of 
parasitic infestation in horses. Dr. R. D. Heard has been engaged in studies of 
oestrin and related hormones. He has investigated also the emplovment of the 
dietary anoestrus mature rat as a test object for the oestruo-inducing gonadotropic 
Iformone of pregnancy urine. Mr. Gunn has studied the effect of various diets on 
growth and survival of guinea-pigs, rabbits, mice and rats. The relationship of diet 
to fertility, the normal oestrus cycles and the effect of diet on oestrus cycles in these 
species has been explored. Mr. Gunn. too. has continued and extended his work on 
vitamin C content of diets in guinea-pigs in relation to character of the intestinal 
flora. He is attempting to develop by selective breeding a strain of guinea-pigs with 
uniformly high tolerance to vitamin C inadeauacy. Mr. Gunn has also observed an 
interesting mutation among the animals in the albino rat colony. He has made a 
survey of flies and the flv problem at the University Farm. A studv has been made 
of the normal bacterial flora of animals in the various colonies and of the species of 
micro-organisms associated with or responsible for sickness or death among these 
animals. 

The very extensive series of investigations herein briefly referred to serves to 
indicate the extent to which the staff of Connaught Laboratories in both University 
and Farm Sections have devoted their efforts to the promotion of preventive medicine 
through enquiry and research. 

The recent additions and improvements in the Farm Section have been com- 
pleted. The Main Building has been altered and rearranged and is now occupied by 
administration offices, research laboratories and living quarters. Number I Unit, 
formerly the west stable, has been converted into a fine laboratory building where 
antigen production, washing, sterilisation and preparation of glassware is carried 
on. The operating unit has been remodelled and now serves as a concentration unit. 
Quarters for vaccine virus production, quite separated from all other activities, have 
been provided in Unit No. II. formerly the centre stable, the upper floor of which is 
now utilised for housing the mouse and r^t colonies. The north end of this building 
houses animals on test and a portion of the south end has been developed as a store 
room. No. Ill Unit, formerly the east stable, provides for the guinea-pig colony 
but at the south end on the second floor, a splendid biochemical laboratory has been 
created. On the first floor directly beneath the biochemical laboratory, quarters for 
heparin production have been found. The Volatile Solvents Building for safe frac- 
tionation and recovery of volatile solvents such as ether, acetone, toluol, etc.. has 
been completed. Two new brick stables, each with a capacitv for 25 horses, have 
been built. The water supply plant has been enlarged to provide for the sedimenta- 
tion, chlorination. filtration and pumping of 50 gallons of water per minute from 
the river. Additions to building, sedimentation tanks and pipe line, all had to be 
made. The daily requirements at present from this water supplv amount to 6000 
gallons. The entire project thus briefly outlined has been completed at a cost of 



124 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

nearly $105,000. This includes, of course, the purchase of five additional acres of 
land secured last year. The Farm now consists of 75 acres of land. 

Plasma and serum production on a large scale has been carried on as usual at 
the Farm. Toxoid production has been greater than ever. Vaccine virus and rabies 
virus (veterinary) for use in Trinidad have been produced in large quantities. 
Nearly 6000 litres of media were prepared during the year and in less than three 
months there were recovered in the new Volatile Solvents Building no less than 540 
gallons of toluol, acetone, alcohol, benzene and ether. Laboratory animals were 
supplied from the farm colonies, rabbits, guinea-pigs, rats and mice to the number 
of more than 34,000. The guinea-pig breeding colony is to built up to a level of 
5000 animals. The Farm Section of the Laboratories is now established and equipped 
as are few serum institutes elsewhere in the world. For research, demonstration and 
the production of biological products facilities have been made available which are 
unexcelled. 

The Comptroller's Section has been extremely active during the year. The total 
volume of distribution was greater than in any like preceding period. During the 
last four months of the year three new products were added to those previously 
distributed. The list now includes: — diphtheria antitoxin, tetanus antitoxin, perfrin- 
gens antitoxin, scarlet fever antitoxin, staphylococcus antitoxin, anti-meningococcus 
serum, concentrated anti-pneumococcus sera, anti-anthrax serum, diphtheria toxoid, 
staphylococcus toxoid, Schick-test preparations, scarlet fever toxins, typhoid vaccines, 
pertussis vaccine, vaccine virus, rabies vaccine, old tuberculin, pneumococcus typing- 
sera, heparin, liver extracts, insulin, adrenal cortical extract and epinephrine hydro- 
chloride solutions. 

During the year products of the Laboratories were sent to all provinces in the 
Dominion of Canada, Yukon and the North-West Territories, and exported to Ber- 
muda, British West Indies (Leeward Islands, Windward Islands, Barbados. Trinidad 
and Jamaica), Chile, England, Formosa, India, Irish Free State, Japan, Newfound- 
land, South Africa and the United States of America. 

Connaught Laboratories Fellowships in Public Health were awarded to Dr. A. 
R. J. Boyd and Dr. A. D. Lapp of British Columbia, to Dr. A. Gagnon, Dr. J. Paquin 
and Dr. J. S. Sirois of the Province of Quebec. 

Many visitors from abroad have come to both University and Farm Sections of 
the Laboratories. This year they were from many parts of Canada, the U.S.A., the 
British Isles, Argentina, Australia, Brazil. China, Esthonia, France, Germany, 
Holland. India, Japan, Mexico. Newfoundland, Norway, Peru and Switzerland. 
Graduate and undergraduate students in the University and members of various 
societies and groups visited the Laboratories for demonstrations, class exercises and 
exhibitions. 

The staff of the Laboratories on June 30, 1936, numbered 245. Ninety four of 
these are in the Farm Section, five in the Western Division, Vancouver, B.C., and 
the remainder in the University Section. During the year 48 new full-time appoint- 
ments were made and there were 14 resignations. Among them was that of Miss 
Alison Kent who for eleven years was in the comptroller's section of these Labora- 
tories and whose faithful and conscientious work is acknowledged with grateful 
appreciation. Miss M. B. Phillips, a graduate of the University in the Faculty of 
Household Science, has been placed in charge of the food kitchens and cafeteria. 
Mr. K. K. Kay, M.A., has been appointed an assistant in the comptroller's office from 
July 1st, 1936. 

The library in charge of Miss 0. E. Somerville, assisted by Miss K. Pichler, has 
again rendered most valuable service to staff and students not only in Connaught 
Laboratories but as well to graduates and undergraduates in various faculties and 
colleges. The seventh volume of Connaught Laboratories Studies was published in 
April. There are forty-six reprints in this volume. The Studies are sent to libraries 
in all parts of the world. The library exchange was quite active during the year. 
Loans have been made to the Farm Section as usual. The total attendance in the 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 125 

library during the year was 6447. Miss Pichler has listed 2407 references to articles 
in current literature during the year. Reprints have been catalogued and arranged. 
Fifteen translations of articles in the literature have been made. One hundred and 
four current journals are received in the library and during the year 164 bound 
volumes and 96 books were added. Dr. A. H. W. Caulfeild, for many years chairman 
of the Laboratories library committee, resigned during the year. To Dr. Caulfeild 
warm thanks and sincere appreciation for his long-continued interest and enthusiasm 
for the library are here expressed. 

I wish in conclusion again to refer to Western Division of Connaught 
Laboratories in the University of British Columbia at Vancouver, established in 
October last with Dr. C. E. Dolman, research member of these Laboratories, in 
charge. Dr. R. J. Gibbons and three others constitute the original staff of the 
Division. Dr. Dolman as head of the department of bacteriology and preventive 
medicine of the University of British Columbia and Director of the Laboratories of 
the Provincial Board of Health of British Columbia is directing a unique co-operative 
enterprise in the field of preventive medicine. Thus far, research enterprises only 
have been undertaken. Routine procedures may be developed later. Excellent 
progress has already been made. It is evident, too, that more space must be made 
available at once if full advantage is to be taken of existing opportunities for useful 
service. 

To the Chairman and members of Connaught Laboratories Committee of the 
Governors of the University and to members of the staff of the Laboratories the 
Director extends his thanks and appreciation for continued support and co-operation. 

(21) STATEMENT REGARDING THE MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 
{Professor C. T. Currelly) 

During the past year, the Museum has continued its steady growth in most of 
ihe departments. 

The prehistoric section, which has probably now reached first place in America, 
has been extremely fortunate in adding another forty-six Luristan bronzes, and with 
them a small series of early Persian potteries. After many years' desire, we have 
obtained one of the 15th century B.C. Svrian sceptre-swords, and also a number of 
very important early Syrian axes, swords and daggers, dating approximately from 
the same period or a few centuries earlier. From the Trans-Jordan comes a remark- 
able stone axe that must have been made somewhere not far from Hungary and have 
been passed south in early movements. Another wanderer far from home is an 
exquisitely beautiful Danish flint axe found in the Polish Carpathians. The British 
School of Archaeology in Jerusalem presented four hundred and eighty-three flint 
implements from Mount Carmel. After twenty-five vears of hunting, a remarkably 
fine Bronze Age British bit has been added to the collection. 

The Egyptian department has received a very fine temple seal, probably for 
sealing the strons-room. and also a continuation of Sir Robert Mond's gift from 
the work of the Egypt Exploration Society. 

Our classical side has not been so fortunate, a little Roman-British decorated 
leather being the only material obtained. 

In metalwork, six Merovingian bronzes and some interesting pieces of French- 
Canadian silver were secured, the latter through the kindness of Mr. Marius Barbeau; 
and several pieces of domestic silver were given by Miss Jean Robertson. A mar- 
\ellous Siamese bronze head of about 1400 was presented by Mr. S. Yamanaka. and 
another very fine one of about 1300 came to us as a gift of the Reuben Wells 
Leonard Bequest. 

The arms and armour section had very little addition, the only outstanding 
piece being a beautiful Persian powder horn of carved ivory, the gift of Mr. Joseph 
Brummer of New York. 



126 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

In furniture, two interesting French-Canadian chairs were obtained, an early 
Canadian overmantel was presented bv Mrs. A. Uilliams Moore, and four French 
Renaissance chairs were presented by the Reuben Wells Leonard Bequest. Of 
general woodwork, one of the quite early French-Canadian sculptures, probably late 
17th or early 18th century, a statue of St. Roch in oak, and also two fine French- 
Canadian carved wood candleholders, were obtained through the kindness of Mr. 
Barbeau. Of general sculpture, through the Leonard Bequest we received a fine 
stucco Madonna and Child of the Italian Renaissance. 

The R. S. Williams Collection of musical instruments was further enriched by 
an English flute, and Mr. Alan H. Ross gave three clarinets, a band flute, and a 
musette. 

The ceramic collection came in for some very good additions. We were able to 
purchase several pieces of early English ware, in which our collection is now 
becoming quite rich; and with the money donated last year by the Ceramic Art Club, 
we obtained some excellent pieces of early English porcelain from the leading 
pottery works. A very fine series of Mohammedan Persian potteries was also 
received, seventeen pieces being presented by the Reuben Wells Leonard Bequest. 

In textiles, several acceptable pieces were presented: a Paisley shawl from Mr. 
William Debenham: a fine cashmere shawl and a velvet garment from General 
W. F. Swinv; a Quaker bonnet from Mr. Esli Terrill; three wooden blocks for 
printing Indian fabrics from Mrs. L. W. R. Bryce; a printed silk gauze shawl from 
Mrs. Gladstone Edwards; a dress from Mrs. Fred R. Love; another Paisley shawl 
from Miss Jean Robertson; and a small collection of silk brocade from Mrs. J. B. 
Laidlaw. 

The department of printing and the book obtained a number of etchings, 
colour-blocks and wood-engravings; and the collection of postage stamps has been 
very greatlv augmented, chiefly through gifts obtained for us by Mr. Paul Hahn or 
given bv him directly. 

On the East Asiatic side, four Ying-Ch'ing porcelains were obtained; a collection 
of clav moulds for bronze casting was given by Bishop W. C. White; Mr. S. 
Yamanaka presented half of a very fine Han tile and three Sung tea bowls; and a 
coat of embroidered gauze was given by Mis? Mabel E. Tom. As an example of 
what it is possible to do in verv hard stone, there was obtained through the Reuben 
Wells Leonard Bequest one of the marvellous, almost paper-thin, jade plates made 
for the Emperor Ch"ien Lung in the latter half of the 18th century. We also 
obtained through the Leonard Bequest a remarkably fine Chinese bronze statuette of 
about 500 A.D". a beautiful painted Japanese screen of about 1600. and a fair-sized 
collection of 17th and 18th century Japanese ceramics. Mrs. W. C. White also 
presented a hundred Japanese stencils for printing textiles. 

In the department of ethnology, we have received a large collection of British 
Columbia jade implements and the boulders from which such implements were cut. 
These show all the stages in the working of a boulder, and as we also received the 
stone saws with which the jade was cut, we are able to illustrate, as few places ever 
will be able to do. this remarkable industry. Thirteen beautifully decorated vases 
from Central America were obtained, and a small quantity of Mexican material. A 
large number of gifts was received in most of the subsections. Conspicuous among 
them was a Libvan collection from Dr. Henry R. Maurer; a Golden Har from Sir 
Harrv Haig: a verv fine Costa Rican metate from the Rev. R. L. Brydges; some fine 
Samoan tapa from the Rev. G. G. Brown: a collection of Patagonian silver from the 
estate of Mrs. S. A. Stewart; and from Mr. L. A. Learmonth a most important series 
of early Eskimo material. A remarkable piece of early Indian sculpture, part of a 
Mexican yoke elaborately carved from porphyry, was obtained through the Reuben 
Wells Leonard Bequest. 

The general work of case-making, cataloguing and teaching has gone on as usual. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 127 

(22) STATEMENT REGARDING THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 
OF ZOOLOGY AND THE BIOLOGICAL MUSEUM 

{Professor J. R. Dyinond) 

The most noted exhibits added during the year were specimens mounted under 
the Reuben Wells Leonard Bequest. Those prepared during the past year included 
the takin. male and female mountain sheep, buffalo calf, elk fawn, coyote, wallaby, 
Tasmanian devil, mink, brush wolf, and timber wolf. 

The exhibition series of Canadian and foreign birds have been improved by 
replacing a number of old specimens by more recent mounts. A series of insects of 
economic value, mounted on their food plants, has also been installed. 

The research collections continue to grow as a result of donations, collection, 
exchange and purchase. The number of specimens of the more important groups 
added during the past year was as follows: 

Mammals 1.476 

Birds 1,539 

Reptiles 55 

Amphibians 122 

Fish 439 

Insects 2,437 

Crustaceans 45 

Molluscs 6.303 

Miscellaneous 1,319 

Among the more important of the donations were: 

Brennand. C. G. 1 passenger pigeon. 

Coventry. Prof. A. F. 118 mammal skins and 1 snake. 

Boyd, Mossom. 119 volumes Buffon's Histoire Naturelle, published 1799-1805, 

and 42 volumes of Jardine's Naturalists' Librarv. 
Clarke, S. H. A pair of pronghorns. commonly called antelopes. 
Merriman, Miss Ida. Diaries and other records of natural historv observations 

of her brother, the late R. 0. Merriman, made between June, 1921 and 

October, 1934. 
National Parks Branch, Department of the Interior. Ottawa. A caribou from 

Jasper Park, a mule deer from Buffalo Park. Wainwright, 5 coyotes, 

1 cougar. 24 mammal stomachs and 27 photographic enlargements of 
animals. 

Pirie, Dr. Alex. P. Case of 16 mounted Costa Rican birds. 

Toronto Parks Department. 31 mammals. 27 birds and 2 reptiles, includine 

Malayan Sun bear, striped hvena, alligator, 2 bear cubs, armadillo, two-toed 

sloth, red kangaroo and spotted hvena. 
Walkinshaw, C. A. 2 Volumes, "Monograph of the Thrushes". 
Waller. Sam. 21 birds, 3 mammals. 1 reptile. 6 bird nests and 59 bird eggs. 
Whelan. R. V. 7 birds, 5 bird engs. 15 mammals, 3 reptiles. 12 fishes, 49 

amphibians, 775 insects. 4 leeches. 4 lots of crustaceans. 115 molluscs, 88 
vials of spiders. 
Fleming. J. H. 3 bird skeletons, 1 lot of molluscs. 184 mammal skins and 

2 birds. 

Donations were also received from the following: Ralph E. Akev, Dr. A. E. 
AUin. William E. Alton, Burt Armstrong. John B. Armstrone, C. E. Atwood, E. W. 
Bailev. James L. Baillie. Jr., Miss Joan Baillie. Gordon Blain, Miss Hettie Bain, 
Mrs. J. M. Baldwin, Frank Banfield. Professor E. W. Banting, Roger Barr, W. Baxter, 
R. Bayliss, L. H. Beamer. Garnet S. Bell, H. Bell. Mrs. B. A. Benslev, J. R. 
Bickerstaff, R. D. Black, Fred Bodsworth Dr. H. M. Bowen, J. F. Brimley, Major 



128 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Allan Brooks, A. W. A. Brown, E. R. Buckell, Charles Burdette, A. G. Burns, E. 
Burnthal, H. Cameron, A. D. Campbell, Mrs. Capon, S. Chamberlain, J. Chisholm, 
Dennis H. Chitty, Dr. C. H. D. Clarke, Dr. F. Arnold Clarkson, M. F. Cook, Harry 
0. Cooper, Charles E. Corfe, Dr. A. Cosens, Norman R. Craig, Crewe Brothers, 
Stuart Criddle, E. C. Cross, Dr. C. T. Currelly, Murray W. Curtis, Rupert Davids, 
Lt. Col. L. S. Dear, Prof. A. T. DeLury, Jack Dennis, Wm. F. Depew, Otto E. Devitt, 
Russell G. Dingman, Kenneth Doan, Captain T. E. Donne, Stuart C. Downing, John 
Edmonds, Paul F. Elson, F. Hardie Emery, Entomological Society of Ontario, Louis 
Epps, A. M. Fallis, Federation of Ontario Naturalists, John Freeman, K. Freeman, 
G. F. Fry, Harold Fulcher, Robert J. Gill, M. E. Gillespie, H. Glazbrook, Norman 
L. Goldthorp, Norman Gooderham, Hedley K. Gordon, Arthur S. Goss, Dr. S. 
Hadwen, Paul Hahn, H. Handley, Professor W. J. K. Harkness, A. T. Harper, Dr. 
Paul Harrington, Miss J. E. L. Hart, Dr. John L. Hart, Mrs. J. A. Harvey, Donald 
Hassel, Holton B. Haugh, Thomas Hayman, Mrs. H. G. Henson, Miss Higgins, C. F. 
Holmes, Clifford E. Hope, G. Hopping, Professor A. G. Huntsman, G. D. Hurlburt, 
Dr. W. Ellis Hurlburt, Dr. F. P. Ide, W. I. Irving, H. Roy Ivor, Howard B. Jackson, 
Allan Johnson, R. W. Johnson, L. L. Jorgensen, Alfred Kay, Charles E. Kay, J. E. 
Keays, W. A. Kennedy, H. H. King, Miss Fanny Korn, Mrs. Ella Kuitunen, T. B. 
Kurata, Dudley Land, Monroe Landon, K. H. Lang, Hon. Chief Justice F. R. 
Latchford, B. J. Lee, Dr. A. H. Leim, C. B. Leonard, Mrs. R. W. Leonard, Wm. J. 
LeRay, R. \ . Lindsay, Henry A. Little Estate, Misses Littman, Charles Lloyd, Hoyes 
Lloyd, F. Lockhart, E. B. S. Logier, Miss Ruth E. Logier, W. H. Lunn, E. G. 
MacDougall, F. A. MacDougall, B. H. Maclntee, H. G. Mack, Donald I. MacKinnon, 
D. MacLulich, Sr., D. A. MacLulich, Wm. C. Mansell, J. M. Marett, Rev. Donald B. 
Marsh, Thomas D. Masey, E. J. R. Mason, Jack May, J. M. McArthur, Dr. 
McCormack, Dan McCowan, J. V. McCutcheon, Robert McKay, Dr. F. W. McKee, 
W. W. McKinlay, Miss M. F. McLennan, Hugh McManus, Dr. G. A. McQuibban, 
J. C. Medcof, M. Meikle, Charles Melton, R. B. Miller, Jack Miner, Miss C. E. 
Mitchell, George C. Morrison, John P. Morton, Charles Mulcahy, Mrs. Ethel Rogers 
Mulvany, J. A. Munro, Dayton Murphy, George S. Myers, Dr. A. W. H. Needier, 
Knud Nielsen, George W. North, Wm. O'Neill, Ontario Dept. of Game and Fisheries, 
John G. Oughton, Mrs. John G. Oughton, Wm. Owen, H. M. Parrington, Mrs. T. C. 
Patteson, Herbert Pickering, W. E. Playter, Leslie A. Prince, Dr. A. L. Pritchard, 
D. L. Proctor, J. W. Rainbow, Wm. Renison, W. E. Ricker, Don Ritchie, Clifford 
Robb, Wallace Havelock Robb, Emerson Robertson, J. B. Roninson, Charles K. 
Rogers, Harold M. Rogers, H. R. Rogers, Blair Ronald, W. F. H. Rosenberg, Douglas 
Ross, J. B. C. Runnings, R. J. Rutter, A. Saunders, Dr. R. M. Saunders, D. M. Scott, 
Mrs. M. E. Servos-Snyder, R. W. Sheppard, T. M. Shortt, Dr. Siddigi. L. H. Sinclair, 
Mrs. W. C. Skelley, W. R. Skey, G. Foster Smith, G. F. M. Smith, T. N. Smith, 
V. Snowden, L. L. Snyder, H. H. Southam, Southwest Scientific Society, Dr. Cam 
Sproule, Dr. Fred Starr, Harold Steele, Levi Sternberg, J. A. Stevenson, Dr. V. H. 
Storey, Frank Stoughton, Edgar E. Sullivan, Miss E. Summers, Hampton W. Swaine, 
Andrew Tait Estate, Miss Nan Taylor, Roy and William Taylor, Dr. T. M. C. Taylor, 
S. L. Thompson, G. C. Toner, Toronto Public Library, H. H. Townson, Sprague 
Troyer, University of Michigan. Thos. F. Upham, Prof. J. Urich. H. A. Van Weeckel, 
Miss Dorothy Walker, Dr. E. M. Walker, Clarence Watson, J. W. Wickett, G. V. 
Wilby, A. L. Wilson, Miss M. Wilson, Robert E. Wright, V. C. Wynne-Edwards, 
Charles Zarobsky. 

Additions to the library include 207 bound books and 758 pamphlets and 
unbound publications. 

The use of the Museum's collections by research workers continues to increase. 
Specimens loaned to institutions and workers outside Toronto include molluscs 
loaned to the University Illinois and to the University of Michigan, mammals 
loaned to the University of California and to the United States Bureau of Biological 
Survey, birds examined by members of the American Ornithologists' Union attending 
the convention here in October, 1935, from the Smithsonian Institution, the University 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 129 

of Michigan. The Bureau of Biological Survey, also birds were loaned to the United 
Slates National Museum. 

As a result of a gift by Mrs. B. A. Bensley, the Royal Ontario Museum ol 
Zoology was able to offer the services of a lecturer, Mr. F. A. Urquhart, to school 
classes visiting the Museum. At first, the response of classes was discouraging, but 
when the nature of the service became better understood, the number of classes 
increased. It is hoped to continue this feature next year. 

The following studies, chiefly taxonomic and faunistic. have been carried on 
during the past year by: 

L. L. Snyder. Movements of willow ptarmigan iLagopus lagopus) in relation 

to changes in their populations. Survey of distribution of birds in Central 

Ontario. Food studies of Ontario birds. 
E. C. Cross. Characters and distribution of Ontario wolves. 
J. L. Baillie, Jr. Distribution of breeding birds in Ontario. 
T. B. Kurata. Distribution of Ontario spiders. 

E. B. S. Logier. Taxonomy and distribution of Ontario amphibians and reptiles. 
J. G. Oughton. Distribution of Ontario mussels. 
Mrs. J. G. Oughton. Distribution of Ontario bats. 



(23) STATEMENT REGARDING THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 

OF GEOLOGY 

{Professor E. S. Moore) 

Two public lectures were delivered during the year under the auspices of the 
Museum of Geology: The Origin of the Great Lakes, by Dr. A. P. Coleman and the 
Story of Oil, by the Director. The section of glacial and interglacial formations at 
the Don Valley Brick Yard has been completed and installed in the gallery and 
forms an exhibit that is quite unique in museums. Other specimens added to the 
collections are as follows: 

Donations : 

Gold ore from the Macassa mine, Kirkland Lake, Ont.. by R. A. Bryce. 

Suite of specimens of clay, bentonite, shale, and sandstone from Saskatchewan, 
l>y H. H. Beach. 

Axinite from Porcupine district. Ontario, by Dr. M. E. Hurst. 

"Sand carbonate" lead ore. Paradise mine, B.C., by R. W. Brigstocke. 

Miner's safety lamp, by Miss A. Pride per Dr. W. A. Parks. 

Specimens of monazite and tourmaline pegmatites and axinite and dumortierite, 
from California, by L. H. Dykes. 

Kauri gum from New Zealand, by Miss L. J. Payne. 

Gold ore from the Afton mine, Timagami Forest Reserve, by W. E. Aitchison. 

Chert from Bedfordshire. England, by H. Cawley. 

Collection of clays and till from Port Hope. Bowmanville. Oshawa, Scarborough, 
and Highland Creek. Ont.. by Dr. A. P. Coleman. 

Gold ore from God's Lake mine, by R. Jowsey. 

Polished specimen showing intricate vein structure from Cornwall iron mines, 
Penna., by Professor H. Ries. 

Limestone from Go-Home-Bay, Ont., by A. M. Bryton. 

Specimen illustrating vein structure from Peru, by Dr. T. L. Walker. 

Two specimens of Elephas primigenius of post-Glacial age. One from north of 
West Hill, Ont.. by E. R. Halladay and the other from Hamilton, by E. M. Proctor 
per A. P. Coleman. 

Gypsum showing remarkable structure, and a suite of cave deposits from New 
Mexico, by R. M. Burnet. 



130 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Purchases : 

Opal from Queensland, Australia. 
Suite of concretions from California. 
Collection of ores from Colorado. 
Bismuth ore from Bolivia. 
Axinite and dumortierite from California. 
Polished scapolite and wernerite from Ontario. 
Lead-zinc ore from Hartz, Germany. 

Prepared in the Museum: Geological relief model of the Sudbury nickel field 
as part of an exhibit of this famous mining field. 

Collections : 

Rock and ore specimens from the Ramore area and Timagami Forest Reserve, 
Ontario, and from Pennsylvania. 



(24) STATEMENT REGARDING THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 

OF MINERALOGY 

[Director, Dr. T. L. Walker) 

In the year under review the museum has added to its great store of minerals 
and rocks by collection in the field, purchase, exchange, and by donations from 
friends. The director spent a part of last summer collecting specimens in British 
Columbia. Professor A. L. Parsons, assistant director, was able to be in the field 
for three days only for a special collecting trip in Hastings County, Ontario. It is 
the settled policv of the museum to collect largely so as to be able to secure Canadian 
material which would otherwise be unobtainable, in order that by exchange with 
similar institutions in other parts of the world we may secure the best available 
material which in many cases could not be obtained in any other way. Already this 
plan has resulted in the enrichment of our collections by exchanges with most of 
the important museums of the world. 

In the exhibition gallery the automatic balopticon with its series of pictures 
relating to the mineral industry continues to be an attraction to young and old alike. 
The exhibit of fluorescent minerals is a never failing attraction where thousands can 
see the different effect of ordinary light and ultra-violet light in producing colour in 
certain minerals. An ever increasing number of students are making use of the 
systematic collections of minerals and rocks and the paragenetic collections, with 
most gratifying results. The larger specimens in the high cases with their descriptive 
labels have received most favourable comment from visitors. One museum curator 
has asked for duplicates of these labels for use in his collection. 

Further additions of fine specimens of gemstones have been made from money 
provided by the bequest of the late Reuben Wells Leonard, Esq. The collection now 
contains good specimens of most of the gemstones and is one of the most popular 
exhibitions in the gallery. 

The work of the last twenty-five years has given the museum one of the finest 
gallery displays in America, so that the additions of a single year might easily be 
overlooked. Attention should be called, however, to an enormous slab of black 
mica from Hastings County which was presented by Dr. T. L. Gledhill. This 
occupies a wall case just inside the entrance to the gallery. 

Heretofore the paid staff in this museum has consisted of two non-scientific 
assistants. With provision for a part-time scientific museum assistant for the 
coming year it is hoped that scientific work of value to the mineral industry may be 
carried on. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 131 

(25) STATEMENT REGARDING THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 
OF PALAEONTOLOGY 

{Professor W. A. Parks) 

The progress in this Museum during the year 1935-36 was as follows: — 

Much material was collected by graduate students, a limited number of foreign 
series was obtained by purchase, and a large collection of vertebrate fossils was 
collected from the Red Deer River; also, vertebrate material was received in 
exchange from the University of Pittsburgh and the Los Angeles Museum. Further, 
I am glad to record that all the remaining material from South America has been 
received. 

In the invertebrate galleries the Ontario material and that obtained by purchase 
has been put in place, and considerable progress has been made in the installations 
of wax models in the geological series of cases. 

In the vertebrate gallery the chief additions are a fine head of Megatherium 
received from South America; a complete skeleton of the camel Slenomylus 
hitchcochi and an excellent head of Promerychochoerus from the Carnegie Museum, 
Pittsburgh. 

In the vertebrate workroom an excellent skeleton of a new species of trachodont 
dinosaur has been completely prepared as an open mount. Another trachodont 
dinosaur has been prepared for exchange with the Pittsburgh Museum. 

Mr. Sternberg has been engaged in repairing and remounting some of the 
material obtained from South America. In particular, he has completed the carapace 
of a large Glyptodon which is now ready to place in the gallery. 

The Styracosaurus material obtained by the expedition of 1935 has proved very 
interesting. We are indebted to Dr. Barnum Brown of the American Museum of 
Natural History who is collaborating with Mr. Sternberg in the working out of the 
anatomy. 

Owing to the absence of the director, descriptive work on the dinosaurs and the 
completion of the monograph on stromatoporoids has of necessitv been discontinued. 
Miss Fritz has completed the revision of our large brachiopod collection and has 
greatly assisted in carrving on the work of the director. 

Progress has been made in the making of models in wax for the underwater 
specimens of the geological series. A new register of all our fossils is now under- 
way; it is hoped that very shortly the registration of material will be in a more 
satisfactory condition. 

The most important acquisitions during the year are as follows: 

By donation 

Two rare pelecypods from Kansas — Mr. J. B. Litsey, Dallas. Texas. 
Crepidophyllum colligatum — Mr. E. J. Buckley, Hamilton. Ontario. 
Collection of rocks and fossils from Wales — Professor A. P. Coleman. Royal 

Ontario Museum. Toronto. 
Collection of Carboniferous plants — Mr. H. J. Fairhead. Lake Simcoe Ice and 

Fuel Ltd., Toronto. 
Collection of cephalopods, corals and plants — Mr. W. H. Harris, Port Perry, 

Ontario. 
A set of publications of the Geological Survey of New Jersey — Dr. Helgi 

Johnson, Rutgers University, New Jersey. 



132 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Specimens of Gonioceras anceps and G. kayi — Dr. Marshall Kay, Columbia 

University, New York. 
Megalomus canadensis — Mr. D. H. Norman, 440 Millwood Road, Toronto. 
Zaphrentis cf. gigantea — Mr. E. S. Pentland, Moose River, Ontario. 
Pleclorthis plicatella — Mrs. H. C. Rae, 40 Charles Street East, Toronto. 
Collection of fossils from Alberta — Dr. J. C. Sproule, Royal Ontario Museum 

of Palaeontology, Toronto. 

By exchange 

Sniilodon calif ornicus I sabre tooth I and Aenocyon dims (wolf) — Dr. C. Stock, 

Los Angeles Museum, Los Angeles, California. 
Megatherium americanum — National Museum, Rio de Janeiro. 
Collection of fossils from the Devonian and Cretaceous of Brazil — Brazil 

Geological Survey. 

By purchase 

Set of fine brachiopods and sea-urchins from Texas — Mr. J. B. Litsey, Dallas, 
Texas. 

By collection 

Summer expedition — per Mr. L. Sternberg. 

Most of the skeleton of a horned dinosaur ( Styracosaurus albertensis) . 

A large part of the crest of Styracosaurus. 

Part of a head and a number of plates of plated dinosaur. 

Skull and part of the skeleton of the plated dinosaur iPano-plosaurus) . 

Turtle iBaena); Turtle { As pide rites ) ; Turtle iAspiderites). 

Large ammonite. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 133 



APPENDIX B 
REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR 

(A. B. Fennell, Esq., M.A.) 

I beg to submit the following statistics for the year ending June 30th, 1936: — 

(a) Distribution of the staff of the University and University College 
(furnished by the Bursar). 

(6) Distribution of the staffs of the federated Arts Colleges (furnished by 
the Registrars of the colleges ) . 

(c) Registration of students by faculties and years. 

id) Enrolment in the Arts Colleges (furnished by the Registrars of the 
colleges) . 

(e) Enrolment in the university departments in Arts (furnished by the 
departments). 

(/) Registration in courses in the Faculty of Arts. 

(g) Registration in courses in the School of Graduate Studies (furnished by the 
Secretary of the School) . 

ih) Results of annual examinations (furnished by the Secretaries of the 
faculties). 

ii) Admission to degrees. 

(/■) Geographical distribution of students (furnished by the Secretaries of the 
faculties) . 



134 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



(a) Distribution of the Staff of the University and University College: 























„ 






















gi2 






















o c 






in 


(B 


tn 


to 








tfi 










V ■" 




u 






>-i in 








o 


re S 






















=0 5^ 


'v 




c 


5 2 


o 

3 






























c 


tft o 










































Cu 


<;cu 


<Dm 


<; 


-J 


Q 


<Q 




o< 


University (Faculty of Arts) .... 




. 42 


32 


28 




37 








130 


University College 




. 16a 


8 


9 


— 


9 


— 


— 


— 


2 


FacuJtv of Medicine 




. 24b 
. 15 


9 
10 


28 


28 


22c 
21 


— 


— 


— 


195(i 


Faculty of Applied Science 




45e 


Faculty of Household Science... 




O 




? 





.S 











9 


Ontario College of Education. . . . 




. 7 
. 2 


4 
2 


3 

1 


— 


14 
2 


— 


— 


31/ 




Faculty of Forestry 




1^ 


Faculty of Music 













4 














Faculty of Dentistry 




. 13 


5/! 


\h 


19 


2A 


— 


— 


— 


8i 


Social Science 




. — 


— 


1 


— 


16,- 


1 


1 


— 


2 


School of Nursing 




• — 


— 


— 


— 


29;c 


1 


1 


— 











a 1 also in University 






















b 1 also in Arts 






















c 1 also in Arts; 2 also in 


Dentistry 


















d 3 also in Arts 






















e 2 also in Arts 






















/ 2 also in University Coll 


?ge; 


1 also 


n Medicine and Dentistry 










g 1 also in Arts and Denti 


nry 




















h 1 also in Medicine 






















i 1 also in Arts and Forestry 




















} 1 also in Dentistry 






















k 12 also in Medicine; 2 als 


in 


Dentistry; 1 a 


so in 


Ontario 


College of Education 





C6^ Distribution of the Staffs of the Federated Arts Colleges: 

Victoria 

College 

Professors 11 

Associate professors 6 

Assistant professors 2 

Lecturers 9 

Instructors 5 

Fellows 1 

Readers 2 



Trinity 


St. Michael's 


College 


College 


12 


15 


4 


11 


, . 


1 


5 


12 


1 


13 


2 


. . 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



135 



(c) Registration of Students by Faculties and Years: 

The number of students registered in the university, in colleges and faculties, 
in the session 1935-36 was 7,409, distributed as follows: 



Faculty of Arts 

University of Toronto 652 

University College 650 

Victoria College 468 

Trinity College 239 

St. Miohael's College 227 

Registered twice 2 

Faculty of Medicine 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering. 

Faculty of Household Science 

Ontario College of Education 

Faculty of Forestry 

Faculty of Music 

School of Graduate Studies 

Faculty of Dentistry 

Registered twice 



501 
535 
497 

143 
127 

7 



1,153 

1.185 

965 

382 

354 

9 



Men 
2,234 



829 
763 

482 

37 

26 

452 

195 

55 



Women 
1,796 



63 

4 

53 

347 

U 

161 

23 

15 



Total 
4,030 



892 
767 

53 
829 

37 

40 
613 
218 

70 



4,963 



2,446 



7.409 



In departments there were registered 539, distributed as follows: 

Department of Social Science 16 104 120 

School of Nursing 349 349 

University Extension (Occupational Therapy) 36 36 

University Extension (Physiotherapy) — 34 34 

16 523 539 

The grand total of registration for the whole university was 7,948, of whom 
4,979 were men and 2,969 were women. 

In addition there were 5,894 persons registered in the Department of University 
Extension in courses and at provincial centres which are referred to in detail in 
y\ppendix A (14). 

The figures may be further analysed as follows: 



Faculty of Arts 

University of Toronto 

Teachers' Classes and Summer Session 

Occasional Arts students 

University College 

First year undergraduates 

Second year undergraduates 

Third year undergraduates 

Fourth year undergraduates 

Occasional students 

Victoria College 

First year undergraduates 

Second year undergraduates 

Third year undergraduates 

Fourth year undergraduates 

Occasional students 



Men 
418 


Women 
467 
34 


Total 
885 


234 


268 






652 

Men 
206 


501 

Women 

165 

143 

134 

72 

21 


1.153 

Total 
371 


186 


329 


142 


276 


102 


174 


14 


35 






650 

Men 
143 


535 

Women 

168 

139 

118 

66 

6 


1,185 

Total 
311 


129 


268 


124 


242 


68 


134 


4 


10- 







468 



497 



965 



136 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Trinity College 

Men 

First year undergraduates 79 

Second year undergraduates 73 

Third year undergraduates 56 

Fourth year undergraduates 30 

Occasional students 1 



First year undergraduates... 
Second year undergraduates. 
Third year undergraduates.. 
Fourth year undergraduates. 
Occasional students 



St. MichaeVs College 



Women 


Total 


52 


131 


39 


112 


39 


95 


13 


43 




1 



239 

Men 

103 


143 

Women 

53 

34 

26 

9 

5 


382 

Total 
156 


59 


93 


53 


79 


11 


20 


1 


6 







227 



127 



254 



Faculty of Medicine 

Men 

First year undergraduates 150 

Second year undergraduates 148 

Third year undergraduates 142 

Fourth year undergraduates 117 

Fifth year undergraduates 115 

Sixth year undergraduates 122 

Candidates for Degree of B.Sc. (Med.) 5 

Candidates for D.P.H 10 

Diploma in Radiology 1 

Diploma in Psychiatry 6 

Graduate students 7 

Occasional students 6 

829 



Women 


Total 


12 


162 


9 


157 


12 


154 


9 


126 


8 


123 


9 


131 


1 


6 




10 




1 




6 


2 


9 


1 


7 



63 



892 



Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering 

Men Women 

First year undergraduates 249 1 

.Second year undergraduates 174 

Third year undergraduates 159 1 

Fourth year undergraduates 174 2 

Fifth year undergraduates 7 

763 4 



Total 
250 
174 
160 
176 
7 

767 



Faculty of Household Science 

First year undergraduates 

Second year undergraduates 

Third year undergraduates 

Fourth year undergraduates 

Occasional students 



Men 



Women 


Total 


10 


10 


9 


9 


28 


28 


4 


4 


2 


2 



53 



53 



Students in attendance.... 

Extra-mural students 

Students in B.Paed. course. 
Registered twice 



Ontario College of Education 



Men 


Women 


Total 


184 


237 


421 


114 


89 


203 


192 


23 


215 


8 


2 


10 



482 



347 



829 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



137 



Faculty of Forestry 

First year undergraduates 

Second year undergraduates 

Third year undergraduates 

Fourth year undergraduates 



Me 



14 



37 



Women 



Total 

8 

7 

8 

14 



37 



Faculty of Music 

First year undergraduates 

Second year undergraduates 

Third year undergraduates 



Me 



D 

9 
12 



26 



Women 
5 

7 
2 



14 



Total 
10 
16 
14 



40 



School of Graduate Studies 

Men 

Candidates for Ph.D 120 

Candidates for M.A 112 

Candidates for M.S 2 

Candidates for M.A.Sc 11 

Candidates for C.E 2 

Candidates for E.E 2 

Candidates for D.Paed 92 

Candidates for M.Sc.F 2 

Candidates for M.Sc. (Dent.) 3 

Candidates for M.S.A 4 

Candidates for Mus. Doc 3 

Graduate students 99 



Women 


Total 


23 


143 


44 


156 




2 




11 




2 




2 


8 


100 




2 




3 




4 




3 


86 


185 



452 



161 



613 



Faculty of Dentistry 

Men 

First year undergraduates 32 

Second year undergraduates 36 

Third year undergraduates 26 

Fourth year undergraduates 40 

Fifth year undergraduates 56 

Candidates for Degree of B.Sc. (Dent.) 4 

Dental Nurses 

Occasional Students 1 



Women 

i 
1 



20 
1 



Total 
32 
37 
27 
40 
56 

4 
20 

2 



195 



23 



218 



Department of University Extension 

B.A. Course 

Summer Session: Men Women 

Regular students 167 195 

Occasional students 8 8 

Teachers' Classes: 
Toronto : 

Regular students 283 307 

Occasional students 9 4 

Specialists' Courses 
Summer Session : 

Regular students 32 10 

Registered twice 81 57 





Grand 


Total 


Total 


362 




16 


378 


590 




13 


603 


42 


42 


138 


138 



418 



467 



885 



885 



138 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Department of Social Science 



First year full-time students 

Second year full-time students 

"Apprentice" students (Second year) 
Part-time students 



Men 
10 


Women 

41 

28 

1 

34 


Total 
51 


2 


30 


3 


4 


1 


35 







16 



104 



120 



School of Nursing 



Full-time students. 
Part-time students. 



Men 



Women 


Total 


81 


81 


268 


268 



349 



349 



(d) Enrolment in the Arts Colleges 

(1) University College: 



O 



2'= t 

.5 «- c £ 



.11 



>- C — t- to 






oac w 









u 



204 
45 



106 
30 



2 
30 



22 
25 



11 

25 



19 
1 
30 14 



First Year — 

Pass 12 14 21 23 12 

Honour 9 22 38 2 

Second Year — 

Pass 4 15 18 7 12 

Honour 7 16 5 4 

Third Year — 

Pass 7 10 41 10 16 127 

General 1 

Honour 13 23 25 1 

Fourth Year — 

Pass 30 

General 

Honour 9 17 13 2 

Totals — 

Pass 23 39 110 40 40 

General 1 

Honour 38 78 81 9 

Teachers' Qasses. . . . 
Graduate Studies. ... 
Other Faculties 

Grand Total 69 134 197 60 40 671 441 



58 



29 



241 
44 



135 
35 



79 

3 

25 



3 

20 



437 

2 

135 



52 

2 

71 



87 



455 

6 

124 



19 
11 

33 
9 

83 

"l 

42 
9 



177 
36 



99 



73 



76 



55 



303 





6 


35 


3 


63 


17 


8 


10 6 11 . 


62 


7 


12 










306 


. Ill 





87 771 230 303 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 139 



(2) Victoria College: 



-^ CB 3 



■n i c ti; .i: c .i ts M E c -j j; is ;;: 2 



First Year — 

Pass 6 5 18 11 1 166 14 43 173 15 114 

Honour 2 18 38 .. .. 51 33 .. 52 11 

Second Year- 
Pass 4 12 36 1 5 111 15 20 99 16 119 

Honour 9 20 8 .. .. 34 21 .. 31 10 

Third Year- 
Pass 2 17 43 .. 3 90 10 2 64 50 83 

General 1 1 3 .. .. 4 ., .. 1 

Honour 5 16 5 . . . . 32 13 . . 15 



5 


18 


18 


38 


12 


36 


20 


8 


17 


43 


1 


3 


16 


5 




29 




1 


io 


9 


34 


126 


1 


4 


64 


60 



Fourth Year — 

Pass 29 20 32 

General .. 1 .. .. 4 .. .. 1 

Honour 9 10 9 . . . . 26 16 . . 20 

Totals — 

Pass 12 34 126 12 9 367 39 65 336 101 348 

General 1 1 4 .. .. 8 .. .. 2 

Honour 25 64 60 .. .. 143 83 .. 118 37 

Teachers' Classes . . . . . . . . 88 2 . . 41 

Graduate Studies 6 8 .. 1 1 14 3 .. 1 



Grand Total 44 107 190 13 10 620 127 65 498 141 34S 



(3) Trinity College: 






— 1) - y) .— S. .Z. ^ 



6D 

C 


E 

O 




o 

C 
V 


(2 


"3) i 


62 


7 


14 


63 


5 


115 


21 


15 




21 


6 




45 


7 


11 


30 


22 


106 


7 


1 




4 


3 




37 


3 




29 


20 


88 


1 












7 


1 
2 




3 


2 


37 


5 


3 




6 


i 




144 


19 


25 


122 


47 


346 


1 












40 


20 




34 


12 




185 


39 


25 


1.56 


59 


346 



First Year — 

Pass 6 5 1 

Honour 2 10 20 

Second Year — 

Pass 9 6 6 

Honour 6 8 8 

Third Year- 
Pass 2 6 5 

General 

Honour 3 3 3 

Fourth Year — 

Pass 

Honour 3 3 3 



Totals — 

Pass 17 17 

General 

Honour 14 24 

Grand Total 31 41 



12 






1 


34 




46 


1 



140 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



(4) St. Michael's 


College: 






















v 
t-l 

o 


c 

CO 


Greek and 

Roman 

History 


C 


c 

CO 

E 




c 

CO 




c 


to 




0. 


en 
CL, 


IB 

3 
. 


First Year — 

Pass 

Honour 

Second Year — 

Pass 


. 2 
1 

. 2 
. 3 

. 1 
. 3 

". "i 


48 

7 

36 
5 

35 
3 

'4 


12 
5 

2 
3 

1 
2 

'2 


80 
13 

50 
5 

45 
3 

"3 


13 

2 

3 

2 

3 
2 

'3 


9 

1 


73 
9 

44 
4 

35 
4 

4 


34 

7 

18 
10 

27 

7 

'4 


65 
13 

33 
8 

32 

7 

'4 


114 
62 






Third Year— 

P^ss 


64 


Honour 




Fourth Year — 

Pass 


12 






Totals — 

Pass 


. 5 
. 8 


119 
19 


15 
12 


175 
24 


19 
9 


10 


152 
21 


79 
28 


130 
32 


252 






Teachers' Classes.... 
Graduate Studies 


















19 
17 




Grand Total 


,. 13 


138 


27 


199 


28 


10 


173 


107 


198 


252 



(e) Enrolment in the University Departments in Arts: 

The following tables exhibit the numbers attending lectures in the university departments in 
the Faculty of Arts, together with the number of those taking the practical work in the laboratories: 

Department of Anthropology 



Pass 



Pass and 

Honour Honour 



General 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 212 

Second Year 

Third Year 1 

Fourth Year 57 

School of Graduate Studies 

Department of Social Science — 

First Year 

Totals 270 



48 



56 



28 

23 

4 

8 



72 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 


1936 


141 


Department of Applied Mathematics 




Pass and 
Honour 


Honour 



FacuJty of Arts — 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering- 
Second Year 

School of Graduate Studies 

Totals 



13 



13 



42 
37 
18 



21 



118 



Department of Archaeology 



Lecture Courses 



1 or 2 or 3 hours 



Pass 



Honour 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Occasional Students. . . . 
School of Graduate Studies. 

Totals 



22 




44 


50 




16 




18 




1 




5 



66 



90 



Department of Astronomy 



Pass 



Honour Laboratory 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 7 

Second Year 47 

Third Year 5 

Fourth Year 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 

Second Year 

School of Graduate Studies 

Department of University Extension — 

Evening Classes 47 

Totals 106 



25 



7 

8 

23 



43 



38 



142 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Department of Biology 



Lecture Courses 



1 or 2 or 3 hours 4 or 5 or 6 hours 7 or more hours 



Laboratory 
Courses 



Pass Honour Pass Honour Pass Honour Pass Honour 



Fciculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year. . 
Third Year... 




.. 235 
.. 63 
.. 50 


108 
81 

57 


Fourth Year 

Teachers' Classes 

Occasional Students.... 

Faculty of Medicine — 

First Year 

Third Year 


'. ". 77 
1 


5 
.3 

171 

1 



Faculty of Household Science — 
First Year 

Faculty of Forestry — 

First Year 

Fourth Year 



Faculty of Dentistry — 
First Year 



School of Graduate Studies. . . . 

Department of Social Science — 
Second Year 

School of Nursing 

College of Optometry of Canada 



17 



11 



8 

14 



32 



20 



25 



10 



138 
63 
50 

77 
1 



17 



108 
81 
35 
17 



171 
1 

11 



8 

14 



32 
35 



25 



Totals 443 



536 



10 



346 



541 



Department of Botany 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Occasional Students 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 

First Year 

Faculty of Household Science — • 

First Year 11 

Second Year 9 

Faculty of Forestr>- — 

First Year 

Fourth Year 

School of Graduate Studies 

Ontario College of Pharmacy 

First Year 87 

Second Year 

Totals 162 



Lecture Courses 


Laboratory 


Courses 


lor2 


or 3 hours 


Pass 


Honour 


Pass 


Honour 


23 


109 
13 

6 
16 

2 


23 

23 

9 


109 


23 


51 


9 


6 




19 




2 



85 

11 
9 



87 

104 



14 

22 



154 



351 



231 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



143 



Department of Chemistry 



Pass 



Pass and 
Honour 



Honour 



Laboratory 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 195 

Second Year 56 

Third Year 28 

Fourth Year 3 

Teachers" Classes 46 

Occasional Student 1 

Faculty of Medicine — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Faculty of Household Science — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Faculty of Forestry — 

First Year 10 

Second Year 7 

Faculty of Dentistry — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

School of Graduate Studies 

Ontario College of Pharmacy — 

First Year 87 

Second Year 104 

College of Optometry of Canada 12 

Totals 549 



174 
128 



103 
76 

122 
18 

10 
11 



33 

37 

27 

49 



167 


265 


120 


160 


30 


54 


15 


17 




46 


•• 


1 




174 




128 




103 


, , 


76 




122 




18 



10 



10 



33 
37 

27 

34 



87 

104 



788 



332 



1,506 



Department of Fine Art 



Pass 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 28 

Second Year 77 

Third Year 31 

Totals 136 



144 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Department of Food Chemistry 
(Faculty of Household Science) 



Faculty of Arts — 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Occasional Students 

Faculty of Household Science — 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Occasional Student 

School of Graduate Studies 

Totals 66 





Pass and 








Pass 


Honour 


Ho 


nour 


Laboratory 


22 








22 


19 






5 


24 




1 




44 
2 


45 

2 


10 








10 


14 






3 
4 


17 
4 


1 






9 


1 
9 



67 



134 



Department of Geography 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Ontario College of Education. 

School of Graduate Studies.. 

Totals 



Honour 


Laboratory 


139 




350 




18 


3 



507 



Department of Geology and Palaeontology 



Lecture Courses 



1 or 2 or 3 
hours 



Pass 



Honour 



4 or 5 or 6 
hours 



Pass Honour 



Laboratory 

Courses 



Pass Honour 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 115 68 

Second Year 13 16 

Third Year 19 11 

Fourth Year .. 6 

Teachers" Classes 28 

Occasional Students 

Faculty of Applied Science 
and Engineering — 

Second Year 59 

Third Year 29 

Fourth Year 19 

Faculty of Forestry — 

Second Year 7 

TWd Year 8 

School of Graduate Studies . . 2 

Totals 297 103 



13 
19 

28 



13 

21 
17 



38 

11 
4 



11 



20 



119 



67 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



145 



Department of History 



Lecture Courses 



1 or 2 or 3 4 or 5 or 6 7 or more 

hours hours hours 

Pass Honour Pass Honour Pass Honour 

Faculty of Arts — 

First Year . . 65 

Second Year . . 34 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 53 

Teachers' Classes 302 

Occasional Students 3 .. .. 7 

School of Graduate Studies . . . . . . 27 

Department of University Exten- 
sion Evening Classes 125 

Totals 430 152 389 239 11 



1% 


11 


105 


126 


88 


62 




6 



11 



Department of Household Science 
(Faculty of Household Science) 



Pass 



Pass and 
Honour 



Honour Laboratory 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Occasional Students 

Faculty of Household Science- 
First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

School of Graduate Studies. . . 

School of Nursing 

Totals 







39 




9 




40 


48 


13 


2 


35 


50 




1 


44 


45 


1 


•• 


2 


3 

> 


10 










10 




10 


ik 


1 


14 


29 






4 


4 






7 


7 


30 






30 



14 



185 



226 



Department of Italian and Spanish 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

School of Graduate Studies 

Totals 





Ital 


an 






Spanish 


Pass 




H 


5nour 


Pass 


Honour 


28 






9 


85 




33 


9 






2 


62 




27 


13 






i 


67 




8 
10 








2 






6 



50 



14 



214 



84 



\46 


REPORT OF THE 




No. 12 


Department of Law 






Pass 


Honour 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 
Third Year 

Faculty of Forestry — 

Third Year 

School of Graduate Studies 

Department of University Extension — 

Evening Classes 

Bachelor of Laws Course 

Totals 





38 




37 




21 




16 


50 




9 





383 



442 



130 



Department of Mathematics 



Lecture Courses 



1 or 2 or 3 
hours 



Pas 



Honour 



4 or 5 or 6 
hours 



Pass 



Honour 



7 or more 
hours 



Pass Honour 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 86 

Second Year 60 

Third Year 36 

Fourth Year 1 

Teachers" Classes 30 

Faculty of Medicine — 

First Year 18 

Faculty of Applied Science ajid 
Engineering — 

First Year 226 

Second Year 100 

Faculty of Forestry' — 

First Year 

School of Graduate Studies 

College of Optometry of Canada.. 10 

Totals 567 



75 


60 


100 


44 


60 


10 


20 





11 

7 



14 



259 



26 



114 



23 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



147 



Department of Military Studies 



Pas 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 22 

Second Year 20 

Third Year 5 

Fourth Year 5 

Occasional Students 2 

Faculty of Medicine — 

First Year 8 

Second Year 2 

Third Year 3 

Fourth Year 5 

Fifth Year 1 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 

First Year 12 

Second Year 9 

Third Year 1 

Fourth Year 2 

Faculty of Dentistry — 

Second Year 2 

Ontario College of Education 1 

School of Graduate Studies 2 

Ontario College of Pharmacy- 
First Year 2 

Totals 104 



Department of Mineralogy and Petrography 



Pas 



Pass and 

Honour Honour Laboratory 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Occasional Students 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Faculty of Forestry — 

Second Year 

School of Graduate Studies 

Totals 26 



25 






25 


1 




30 


31 






21 


6 






8 


5 




4 




4 




163 




163 




46 




46 




20 




20 




3 




3 




11 




11 






11 


11 



247 



70 



325 



148 


REPORT OF THE 






No. 12 


Department of Philosophy 






Pass 


Pass and 
Honour 


Honour 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 85 

Second Year 122 

Third Year 184 

Fourth Year 60 20 

Teachers' Classes 17 

School of Graduate Studies 

Department of Social Science — 

First Year 46 

Totals 514 20 



102 

145 

73 

35 



46 



401 



Department of Physics 





Pass 


Pass and 
Honour 


Honour 


Laboratory 


Faculty of Medicine — 

First Year 

Second Year 


173 
62 
41 

7 
23 

21 


174 
1 

11 
32 
24 


168 

105 

41 

26 

8 

12 
8 

11 
60 


235 
153 


Third Year 

Fourth Year 


70 
29 


Teachers' Classes. Summer Session 


22 


Candidates for Specialists' Certificates, 

Summer Session 

Faculty of Medicine — 

First Year 

Diploma in Radiology 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 

First Year 


6 

174 

1 

12 


Second Year 

Faculty of Household Science — 

First Year 

Faculty of Forestry — 

First Year 


8 
11 
11 


Faculty of Dentistry — 

First Year 


32 


School of Graduate Studies 


30 


College of Optometry of Canada 

Department of University Extension — 

Physiotherapy 


26 
21 


Totals 


327 


244 


439 


841 







UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



149 



Department of Political Science 



Lecture Courses 



1 


or 2 or 3 


4 


or 5 or 6 


7 


or more 




hours 




hours 




hours 


Pass 


Honour 


Pass 


Honour 


Pass 


Honour 


125 


75 








115 


200 


21 


4 






92 


178 


31 






7 


57 


5 


23 








78 


2 


2 


1 


i 







Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Occasional Students.... 

Faculty of Household Science — 

Second Year 5 

Third Year 21 

Faculty of Forestry — 

Third Year 5 

School of Graduate Studies 

Totals 541 



22 



152 



364 



150 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Department of Psychology 





Lecture Courses 






1 or 2 or 3 
hours 


4 or 5 or 6 
hours 


7 or more 
hours 


Courses 


Pass Honour 


Pass Honour 


Pass Honour 


Pass Honour 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 180 

Second Year 130 

Third Year 110 

Fourth Year 62 

Teachers" Classes. . . . 126 
Teachers^ Classes, 

Summer Session. . . 21 

Occasional Students. 6 



17 
4 
8 



28 

14 

6 

6 



10 


107 


27 


2 


26 


12 


4 




4 



Faculty of Medicine — 

Second Year 128 

Third Year 20 

Fourth Year 25 

Faculty of Household 
Science — 

First Year 7 

Second Year 5 

Third Year 18 

Fourth Year 1 

School of G r a d u a te 

Studies 24 

Department of Social 
Science — ■ 

First Year 31 

Second Year 36 

School of Nursing 28 

College of Optometry 
of Canada 20 

Department of Univer- 
sity Extension — 
Occupational 

Therapy 34 

Physiotherapy 19 

Evening Classes 320 

Centralised Pupil 
Nurses 225 

Totals 1.379 226 



20 



18 



12 



32 



72 



28 



133 



95 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



151 



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152 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



153 



(h) Results of the Annual Examinations 
Faculty of Arts 



First Year 



Course 






CJ 



u 



u 



u 



■a .r -= 



U 



Pass 

Supplementals 

Classics 

Greek and Hebrew 

Latin (French or Greek Option) 

Modem Languages 

English and History 

Modem Historv- 

Political Science and Economics 

Sociology 

Law 

Philosophy 

Philosophy (English or History Option) 

Psychology 

Mathematics and Physics 

Science 

Household Economics 

Commerce arfd Finance 

Occasional Students 

Totals 



145 123 42 111 421 268 95 58 8 
24 18 10 8 60 44 16 .. .. 



6 2 2 

1 .. .. 

4 5 2 

27 29 13 

13 16 6 

6 3 2 

13 14 18 

11 1 

3 3 

6 

5 

5 

25 13 

25 22 
20 16 

26 29 13 
3 1 .. 



4 
29 
1 
3 
6 



10 10 
1 1 

13 9 

75 54 

41 29 

11 8 
45 26 
16 11 
35 28 
15 12 
20 16 

12 9 
44 30 
61 40 
39 29 



4 
18 
11 

1 



7 12 

1 4 

5 2 

,. 3 

1 3 



14 
3 



70 44 14 12 
13 12 1 .. 



47 



9 381 321 135 156 1.002 680 169 153 17 12 64 



154 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Second Year 



Course 



iversitj 
ForonK 

iv. Coll 




o 
c 


o 
U 


< 


-a 

5U 


c 

-3 
c 


-a 


o 
an 


-a 

0; 

u 






> 


H 


t>5 


o 


C3 


o 








(5 




. 118 


110 


53 


64 


345 


243 


65 


37 


8 




15 




. 19 


19 


4 


9 


51 


31 


20 












. 3 


5 


6 


2 


16 


13 




3 










. 1 








1 


1 














. 3 








3 


3 














. 1 




2 


2 


5 


3 


i 


i 










. 1 


3 






4 


4 














. 25 


21 


1 


4 


51 


46 


2 


3 










. 10 


12 


1 


2 


25 


24 




1 










. 1 


2 


2 




5 


3 


2 


, , 










. 23 


8 


9 


1 


41 


31 


2 


8 










. 7 


10 






17 


13 




4 










. 18 


8 


6 


i 


33 


27 


4 


2 










. 3 


1 




3 


7 


7 














. 3 


9 


3 


4 


19 


15 


2 


2 










. 4 


5 


1 




10 


6 


3 


1 










. 14 


12 


4 


1 


31 


19 


2 


10 










. 4 




3 




7 


3 


1 


3 




i 






. 2 








2 




1 


1 




1 






. 1 




2 


1 


4 


2 


1 


1 




1 






.. 2 


3 






5 


3 




2 










. 2 


3 






5 


3 




2 










.. 12 


6 


4 


1 


23 


17 


2 


4 




i 






.. 7 


5 


2 




14 


7 


2 


5 










.. 2 


1 


2 




5 


4 


1 












.. 2 


2 


1 




5 


1 


4 






i 






1 








1 






i 










. . 10 


22 


3 


2 


37 


25 


5 


7 




2 


3 




. . 30 


8 


4 


3 


45 


33 


5 


7 






3 




6 1 








7 


7 










, , 




.. 1 








1 


1 













Pass 

Supplementals 

Classics 

Greek and Hebrew 

Oriental Languages 

Latin (French or Greek Option) Div. L. 
Latin (French or Greek Option) Div. IL 

Modern Languages 

English and History 

Modern History 

Political Science and Ex^onomics 

Sociology 

Law 

Philosophy 

Philosophy (English or History Option) . 

Psychology 

Mathematics and Physics 

Physics and Chemistry 

Physics and Geology 

Physics 

Biology 

Physiology and Biochemistry 

Biological and Medical Sciences 

Chemistry 

Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology 

Geology and Mineralogy 

Science ( General ) 

Household Economics 

Commerce and Finance 

Occasional Students 

Registered Twice 



Totals 



6 329 275 113 100 823 593 125 105 14 7 28 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



155 



Third Year 



Course 






CJ 



n ilS £ w 



O JO D O <D t/ 

U fc < ffiQ Q 



Pass 

Supplementals 

General 

Classics 

Hebrew and Ancient History 

Latin (French or Greek Option) Div. I.... 

Modern Languages 

English and History 

Modern History 

Political Science and Economics 

Sociology 

L^w 

Philosophy 

Philosophy (English or History Option)... 

Psychology 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. I 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. H 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. HI 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. IV and V.. 

Physics and Chemistry 

Physics 

Biology 

Physiology and Biochemistry 

Biological and Medical Sciences 

Chemistry 

Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology, Div. \\ 

Geology and Mineralogy 

Science ( General ) 

Household Economics 

Commerce and Finance 

Occasional Students 



120 106 42 



10 

2 



1 .. 

4 .. 

23 13 

14 16 

1 4 

8 6 

.. 3 

14 5 



16 11 

6 5 

.. 1 

.. 2 

1 1 

15 17 

11 15 



1 

3 
4 
4 
13 
1 
2 



1 1 



19 12 

10 10 
16 15 

1 1 

6 4 
42 36 
34 32 

11 7 
27 25 

4 4 

21 19 

7 7 
14 10 

2 



2 
11 
10 
4 
5 
5 
1 
3 
7 



31 18 
15 9 

2 2 

2 2 

2 1 
35 21 

32 27 

3 3 



44 22 

7 .. 


6 . 








..13. 




2 






4 2 
.. 2 

1 3 
.. 2 


4 . 
1 . 




1 1 






1 3 






1 3 

1 .. 


















1 1 
.. 1 

2 . . 






2 11 






2 4 










1 


1 .. 






8 6 1 
5 .. 2 . 


1 1 
. 1 



Totals 



3 279 251 95 80 708 563 81 64 18 1 



156 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Fourth Year 



Course 



:H ■= 



> 

'5 


"3 
U 

> 




o 
U 

c7) 


< 

O 




7 


5 


2 




14 


14 


6 


6 


3 




15 


15 


2 








2 


2 


3 






2 


5 


5 




3 






3 


3 


i6 


18 


6 


3 


43 


42 


16 


11 


2 


3 


32 


32 


2 


2 


2 




6 


6 


14 


11 


8 




33 


33 


4 


4 






8 


8 


7 


3 


6 




16 


16 


4 


2 




4 


10 


10 


1 


5 


1 




7 


7 


3 


1 






4 


4 


6 


2 






8 


7 


6 


] 




2 


9 


8 


1 








1 


1 


1 


1 


i 




4 


4 


2 


1 






3 


3 


5 


5 






10 


10 


3 




i 




4 


4 


15 


8 


2 




27 


24 


6 


3 






9 


9 


1 








1 


1 




1 






1 


1 




1 






1 


1 




2 






2 


2 


20 


19 


4 


1 


44 


44 


22 


16 


5 


2 


45 

2 


45 
2 



> 2 



C 73 60 

O CB IJ 

u fa <; 



General 

Classics 

Greek and Hebrew 

Latin (French or Greek Option), Div. I.... 
Latin (French or Greek Option), Div. II... 

Modern Languages 

English and History 

Modern History 

Political Science and Economics. 

Sociology 

Law 

Philosophy 

Philosophy (English or History Option).... 

Psychology 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. I 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. II 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. Ill 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. IV 

Physics and Chemistry 

Biology 

Physiology and Biochemistry 

Biological and Medical Sciences 

Chemistry 

Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology, Div. I.. 
Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology, Div. II. 

Geology and Mineralogy 

Science ( General) 

Household Economics 

Commerce and Finance 

Occasional Students 



Totals 


2 173 131 43 20 369 363 3 3 


4 4 








Teachers' Course 




Passed Conditioned 


Total 



May Examination 603 211 

September Examination 321 104 

924 315 
Duplicates 



First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Fifth Year 

Sixth Year 

B.Sc. (Med.) 

Diploma in Public Health 
Diploma in Radiology. . . 

Totals 



814 
425 



1,239 
190 



Totals 






1.049 










Faculty of Medicine 




Passed 


Conditioned 


Failed 



92 


37 


30 


77 


30 


14 


73 


29 


16 


89 


30 


4 


% 


22 


5 


121 


8 


2 


4 


, , 


.. 


10 






1 







563 



156 



71 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



157 



Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering 



Passed 'with 
Honours 



Passed Conditioned Failed 



First Year — 

Civil Engineering 

Mining Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering.. 

Architecture 

Engineering Physics 

Chemical Engineering.... 
Electrical Engineering.... 
Metallurgical Engineering. 

Second Year — 

Civil Engineering 

Mining Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering.. 

Architecture 

Engineering Physics 

Chemical Engineering.... 
Electrical Engineering.... 
Metallurgical Engineering. 

Third Year — 

Civil Engineering 

Mining Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering. . 

Architecture 

Chemical Engineering . . . . 
Electrical Engineering. . . . 
Metallurgical Engineering. 

Fourtli Year — 

Civil Engineering 

Mining Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering.. 

Architecture 

Chemical Engineering. . . . 
Electrical Engineering. . . . 
Metallurgical Engineering. 

Fifth Year- 
Architecture 

Totals 





6 


7 


6 




19 


12 


15 


2 


10 


5 


10 




2 




3 


3 


4 




4 


5 


27 


29 


24 


8 


10 


5 


11 


1 


4 


3 


4 




1 


2 


3 


2 


14 


11 


8 


4 


7 


10 


5 


1 


4 


2 




2 


2 


2 


1 


9 


13 


18 


19 


1 


4 


a 


3 




8 


5 




1 


4 


2 


1 


4 


7 


7 


3 


3 


12 


4 


6 


2 


4 


1 




9 


20 


19 


8 


7 


14 


4 


9 


1 


3 


2 




3 


8 


6 


1 


4 


11 


2 




8 


30 


3 


1 


6 


3 


2 




13 


26 


6 




15 


12 


3 




5 


5 


2 





120 



300 



179 



145 



Faculty of Household Science 



First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Occasional students 
Supplementals . . . . 

Totals 



issed 


Conditioned 


Failed 


5 


3 


2 


3 


4 


1 


23 


3 


2 


2 


2 




2 


1 


, . 


2 


1 





37 



14 



158 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Ontario College of Education 



Passed 



Failed 



*High School Assistants' Course 390 

Specialists' Courses 143 

First Class Public School Course 78 

Elementary' Art Course 28 

Elementarj' Commercial Course (passed in part) 56 

Elementary' Music Course 6 

Elementarj' Physical Education Course 112 

Intermediate Household Science Course 4 

Librarians" Course 47 

Bachelor of Pedagogy Course 52 

Bachelor of Pedagogy Course (passed in part ) 74 

Number who failed in whole or part . . 163 

Totals 990 163_ 

*Many of these are included among those who passed or failed in the other courses in this list. 



Faculty of Forestry 



Passed Conditioned Deferred 



Failed 



First Year 5 

Second Year 6 

Third Year 8 

Fourth Year 13 

Totals 32 



Faculty of Music 



Passed 



Conditioned Failed 



First Year 9 

Second Year 7 

7 bird Year 4 

Totals 20 



10 



Faculty of Dentistry 



Passed Conditioned Failed 



First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Fifth Xear 

B.Sc. (Dent. » Candidates 

Supplemental 

Dental Nurses 

Totals 



17 


10 


5 


30 


6 


1 


20 


6 


1.. 


35 


4 




54 


2 




1 






1 






20 







178 



28 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 159 



Departments 

The numbers examined in the diflferent departments of the University, including 
those persons granted standing for military service, were as follows: 

Arts: 

Fourth Year 359 

Third Year 7Q8 

Second Year 823 

First Year 1 002 

Teachers' Course 1,049 

Graduates (Specialist Standing) 31 

4,032 

Medicine: 

Sixth Year 131 

Fifth Year 123 

Fourth Year 123 

Third Year 118 

Second Year 121 

First Year 159 

B.Sc. ( Med. ) 4 

Diploma in Public Healtli 10 

Diploma in Radiology 1 

790 

Applied Science and Engineering: 

Fifth Year 7 

Fourth Year 175 

Third Year 157 

Second Year 166 

First Year 239 

744 

Household Science 53 

Education 762 

Forestry 37 

Music 35 

Graduate Studies 500 

Dentistry- 213 

Social Science 118 

School of Nursing 78 

Law 8 

Pharmacy 218 

Agriculture 127 

Veterinary Science 47 

Local Examinations in Music 14,109 



160 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



(i) Admission to Degrees: 



LL.D. ( Honorary) 

D.Sc. ( Honorary) 

Mus. I>oc. ( Honorary') 

Ph.D ' 

M.A 

MS 

M.A.Sc 

C.E 

E.E 

aPaed. ^[\[[y.]][ ...['.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.['.'.'.'.".'.".'.'.'.." ". 

M.Sc.F 

Mus. Doc 

M.Sc. (Dent.) 

M.S.A 

B.A 

B.Com 

M.D 

B.Sc. (Med. » 

B.A.Sc 

B.Arch 

B.H.Sc 

B.Paed 

B.Sc.F 

Mus. Bac 

D.D.S 

B.Sc. (Dent.) 

LL.B 

B.S.A 

B.V.-Sc 

Phm.B 

Totals 1.196 



Men 


Women Total 


7 


1 


8 


3 




3 


1 




1 


33 


3 36 


68 


22 90 


1 




1 


12 




12 


2 




2 


1 




1 


2 




2 


2 




2 


3 




3 


2 




2 


1 




1 


322 


335 657 


43 


2 45 


132 


8 140 


4 




4 


159 




159 


14 




14 




18 18 


47 


5 52 


14 




14 


4 




4 


59 




59 


1 




1 


2 




2 


115 


2 117 


45 




45 


97 


3 100 



399 



1..595 



(j) Geographical Distribution of Students: 

FACULTY OF ARTS 













St. 








University 


University 


Victoria 


Trinity 


MichaeFs 


Dupli- 






of Toronto 


College 


College 


College 


College 


cates 


Totals 


Ontario: (1) Province.. 


4S1 


435 


377 


152 


99 


4 


1.540 


(2) Toronto . . 


637 


680 


557 


213 


164 


5 


2,246 


Nova Scotia 


2 


2 


3 










7 


New Brunswick 


1 


1 












3 


Prince Edward Island.. 


















Quebec 


7 


5 


3 


i 








17 




5 

7 


5 
12 


2 
4 


4 
2 








i«; 


Saskatchewan 


26 




6 

2 


13 

7 


3 


3 








25 


British Columbia 


13 


United States 


4 


13 


3 


4 


81 






105 


Elsewhere 


1 


12 


13 


3 


3 






■\? 








Totals 


1.153 


1,185 


965 


382 


354 


9 


4.030 











UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



161 



THE UNIVERSITY 



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(1) Province.... 


1,540 


326 


311 


26 


510 


IB 


15 


180 


91 


43 


(2) Toronto 


2.246 


477 


421 


24 


249 


13 


19 


257 


74 


49 


Nova Scotia 


7 


4 






6 






21 




h 


New Brunswick 


3 


3 


i 




5 






20 


1 




Prince Edward Island 




2 






1 






4 




2 


Quebec 


i? 


6 


2 









2 


5 


2 


2 




16 
26 


3 

23 


5 

7 




9 

25 






20 

27 


9 
14 


S 


Saskatchewan 


7 


Alberta 


25 


8 


8 








i 


11 


2 


4 


British Columbia .... 


13 


20 


5 


2 


12 




2 


16 


1 


2 


United States 


105 


9 


2 


1 


3 




1 


29 


7 




Elsewhere 


32 


11 


5 




4 


i 




23 


17 


i 







2 






1 


6 








1 








9 




1 




4 




1 




9 




2 




4 




2 


i 


3 


3 


1 


1 


ii 









44 

39 

10 

52 

73 

141 

65 

80 

157 

105 



Totals 4.030 892 767 53 829 37 40 613 218 120 349 36 34 70 7.948 



162 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 





< 

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<: 


Algoma 


30 


10 


3 




4 






1 


3 


1 


•J 


2 




1 


56 


Brant 


46 


12 


4 




7 






1 




2 


10 




2 




86 


Bruce 


42 


4 


7 




12 






5 


7 


2 


3 






1 


81 


Carleton 


59 


8 


11 


4 


24 






7 


9 


2 


8 






1 


132 


Cochrane 


14 




2 




4 








1 












21 


DuflFerin 


19 


2 


1 




3 








1 


1 


1 


1 






30 


Dundas 


6 


1 


2 




3 






2 


1 












15 


Durham 


28 

17 


3 


2 

1 




3 
8 






4 
3 


1 
2 




6 
3 




1 




48 


Elgin 


35 


Essex 


52 


15 


IS 




27 






5 




•? 


3 




i 


i 


119 


Frontenac 


5 


1 






12 






2 


1 




4 




1 




26 


Glengarry 


4 








4 






1 




1 




1 






11 


Grenville 


6 
55 


6 
11 


i 




6 
11 








"3 


2 


6 








20 


Grey 


87 


Haldimand 


13 


2 


3 




8 






2 






1 








30 


Haliburton 


37 


5 


io 




"s 






,3 


i 




1 

4 








1 


Halton 


72 


Hastings 


23 

36 

8 


4 
3 


3 
5 
3 


i 


8 
13 

1 


1 




5 


4 


1 
1 


2 

1 








46 


Huron 


64 


Kenora 


12 


Kent 


17 


7 


8 




6 


1 


1 


3 


3 




4 








50 


Lambton 


28 


8 


6 


2 


6 






5 


4 




7 


2 






68 


Lanark 


8 


1 


2 




7 






6 




2 


1 


2 






29 


Leeds 


11 

2 


2 






8 
3 










2 


1 
1 








26 


Lennox & Addington. 


7 


Lincoln 


52 

1 

9 

14 

15 


7 

i 

5 
13 


14 
1 
2 
1 
'? 


"i 

1 


12 

44 

2 

7 


i 




5 
9 


3 


"3 


8 

'5 

2 
10 




i 


1 


100 


Manitoulin 


2 


Middlesex 


75 


Muskoka 


26 


Nipissing 


50 


Norfolk 


12 


4 


4 




1 






2 


6 












29 


Northumberland .... 


18 


4 


2 




11 






1 






5 








42 


Ontario 


58 
19 


9 

7 


5 
8 


i 


11 
8 






9 
5 




1 
1 


5 
4 




i 


i 


99 


Oxford 


53 


Parry Sound 


16 


1 


1 




7 












2 








29 


Peel 


63 


2 


16 




14 






9 




2 


4 






2 


108 


Perth 


48 


12 


6 


1 


12 


1 




5 


4 


1 


5 






1 


95 


Peterborough 


32 


6 


6 




7 






3 


2 




3 








61 


Prescott 


3 


1 






2 




















6 


Prince Edward 


8 


1 






9 






1 














19 


Rainv River 


2 


5 












1 














9 


Renfrew 


17 


1 






6 






2 






4 








30 


Russell 






















1 








1 


Simcoe 


102 
6 


16 
3 


17 


3 


12 
4 






4 


2 


2 


11 
2 


2 






171 


Stormont 


16 


Sudbury 


13 




4 


2 


2 




















21 


Thunder Bay 


17 


5 


10 




10 


i 




3 


5 




3 








54 


Timiskaming 


32 


13 


10 


i 


4 


2 




1 


4 




10 






i 


76 


Victoria 


25 
43 
39 


5 
16 
18 


2 

15 
18 


i 


7 

13 
11 


1 
1 


2 
1 
3 


2 
6 

4 


3 

2 


4 
1 


8 
3 






1 
3 


43 


Waterloo 


107 


Welland 


100 


Wellington 


52 
69 


11 
31 


13 
30 


1 
1 


16 
60 


2 
2 


1 


11 
19 


2 
10 


6 


7 
11 






i 

1 


115 


Wentworth 


238 


York 


189 


24 


32 


1 


22 


2 




21 


4 


3 


14 


2 


2 




316 


Toronto 


2.246 


477 


421 


24 


249 


13 


i9 


257 


74 


49 


103 


18 


15 


46 


3 919 






Totals 


3.786 


803 


732 


50 


510 : 


51 


34 


437 


165 


92 


300 


33 


27 


67 


7,182 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 163 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 
Superintendent's Office 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 
1935-36 



No new construction of a major nature was started during the year. Certain 
work at the Royal Ontario Museum and the David Dunlap Observatory, but more 
particularly, at the Connaught Laboratories Farm, brought the total value of new 
construction to approximately S68.000.00. 

Buildings I Maintenance ) 

During the year approximately $72,000.00 was expended on Repairs and 
Renewals of the Lniversitv buildings and the Royal Ontario Museum. This amount 
is considerably less than one-half of one percent of replacement valuation, and is 
used largely in maintaining the fabric and mechanical services of the buildings. 
With the appropriation available, it is impossible to meet the demands for such 
items as improved lighting and interior decoration. 

The regular yearly inspection of all fire hose has taken place, and the necessary 
replacements made. Chemical extinguishers have been inspected, discharged and 
re-filled, and special extinguishers provided for special hazards. An inspector from 
the Toronto Fire Department has also made an inspection of our buildings from a 
fire hazard standpoint. 

In addition to the 57 buildings directly supervised by my office, heat and light 
are supplied to Knox College, Victoria University and Wycliffe College, and some 
power to Trinity College. 

The expenditure for fuel and electricity for University buildings and the Royal 
Ontario Museum, and the services to the colleges mentioned above, was approximately 
8141,000.00 The consumption of electricity continues to increase. For financial 
reasons, this is checked as much as possible, even to the extent of lagging behind 
accepted practice. Due to the wider use of electricity in its application to teaching 
and research, and the demand for higher lighting intensity, this increase is inevitable. 
Both our present generating and distributing systems are inadequate. 

Employees and Workshops 

The average number of employees working for the office, exclusive of contracts, 
was 276, tradesmen accounting for 81 of this number. The merchandise distributed 
through Superintendent's Stores amounted to aproximately S104.000.00. The 
wage item for sundry labour was approximately S282,000.00, while salaries of 
semi-permanent staff amounted to $28,000.00, making a total of approximately 
$310,000.00. These figures include services rendered to Connaught Laboratories, 
Hart House. Athletic Association, etc., the Royal Ontario Museum, and the colleges. 



]64 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Purchasing 

During the vear. 8,564 deparlmental orders and 7,002 Superintendent's Stores 
and work orders, a total of 15.566, were sent out, and, in consequence, 22,170 
accounts were passed for payment. These purchases involved the passing of 1,169 
customs entries handled within the office. In addition, 5,390 accounts for work done 
for separate financial entities were sent out for payment. Accounts are passed 
promptlv for payment, so that all possible discounts are obtained, and the good wi-ll 
of the sales people maintained. Every effort is made to obtain the known benefits to 
which the University is entitled under the Customs and Sales and Excise Acts. 



Post Office 

During the year, the turnover in the branch Post Office in the University 
amounted to approximately 833,000.00. The revenue to the Lniversity from this 
source was 81,097.88. 

Police and Watchmen 

The Police Force has been successful in handling the problems created by the 
public. Its relationship with the student body continues cordial, and effective at the 
same time. \^ e are indebted to the City Police for their willing co-operation at all 
times. A close supervision of the watchman service is maintained, and daily reports 
are carefully checked. 

Central Plant 

The amount of radiation heated from the Central Plant, exclusive of high 
pressure service, was 347,856 square feet, as against 344,237 for the previous year. 
The total cost of operation was 8139.182.38, as against 8137,510.50 for the previous 
year. The total unit cost for heat and light was 40.0c per square foot of radiation, 
as against 39.9c for the previous year. The amount of 40.0c was made up of 24.0c 
for heat, and 16.0c for light and power. The average temperature. October to May 
inclusive, was 1.24 above the average, against 1.92 degrees above the average for the 
same period the vear before. The unit cost of coal was approximately the same as 
for the previous year. 

Comparative tables showing the operation of the Central Plant and the distribu- 
tion of charges for 1934-35 and 1935-36 are attached. 



November 2nd. 1936. 



D. LePan, 

Superintendent. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



165 



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166 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



167 



POWER HOUSE 



COAL 1934-35 1935-36 

Maximum daily consumption 99 tons 99 tons 

Maximum weekly consumption 607 tons 631 tons 

Average daily consumption — 

September 12 tons 21 tons 

October 38 tons 40 tons 

November 53 tons 52 tons 

December 65 tons 69 tons 

January 72 tons 70 tons 

February 73% tons 79 tons 

March 57 tons 58 tons 

April 42 tons 50 tons 

May 28 tons 22 tons 

June 11 tons 12 tons 

Consumption — Central Plant 13,301 tons 13,838 tons 

Auxiliary Plant, Museum Area 1,355 tons 1,362 tons 

Total consumption 14,656 tons 15,200 tons 

Total cost of operation $137,510.50 $139,182.38 

Load in square feet of radiation 344.237 347,856 

Light and Power charges $ 53,452.46 $ 55,712.70 

Cost of Heat $ 84,028.04 $ 83,469.68 

Cost of Heat per square foot of radiation 24.4c 24.0c 

NOTE: In this distribution of cost, no allowance is made for high pressure steam supplied. 



TEMPERATURES 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

Yearly average . . . . 



1934-35 



1935-36 



48.6 


2.0 


above 


average 


50.2 


3.6 


above 


average 


42.1 


6.2 


above 


average 


39.8 


3.8 


above 


average 


25.56 


.63 


below 


average 


22.7 


3.5 


below 


average 


20.8 


1.1 


below 


average 


22.4 


.5 


above 


average 


22.4 


.02 


above 


average 


17.5 


5.0 


below 


average 


35.5 


6.8 


above 


average 


34.5 


5.8 


above 


average 


43.7 


2.5 


above 


average 


39.6 


1.6 


below 


average 


52.0 


.4 


below 


average 


58.7 


6.3 


above 


average 


36.33 


1.92 


above 


average 


35.7 


1.24 


above 


average 



168 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

AUDITOR'S CERTIFICATE 

Toronto, 19 November, 1936. 

To the Governors of the University of Toronto: 

Gentlemen : 

I have verified the attached Balance Sheet of the University dated 30th June, 
1936, and Schedules 1 to 10, and report that all the transaction's of the year upon 
the Revenue and Capital Accounts have been duly audited and found correct. 

The securities representing your investments are held in safekeeping by your 
bankers. The Canadian Bank of Commerce, and were produced foi my examination 
on 2nd July, 1936, and also at another time during the year, and found to be in 
agreement with the records kept by the Bursar. Your securities consist largely of 
bonds issued or guaranteed by the Dominion of Canada and by the Province of 
Ontario and bonds of Ontario municipalities with certain corporation and other 
securities received as bequests. Their market value as at 30th June, 1936, was greater 
than their book value by approximately $1,072,262.87. 

Bonds of the following municipalities which are included in your investments 
are in arrears of interest from one to four years or interest payments are being 
received at reduced rates: 

Par Valkie Book Value 

Town of Mimico 

51/2% 1942-45 $21,000.00 $21,919.25 

Essex Border Utilities 

51/2% 1945-47 19,047.60 19,802.72 

Town of Weston 

5% 1936-1953 51.041.94 50,446.25 

Town of Bridgeburg 

51/2% 1936-1946 23,194.01 23,746.75 

Township of East York 

5% 1944-1946 30,000.00 29,792.65 

Township of York 

5% 1935-1936 16,000.00 15.942.20 

Township of Scarborough 

5% 1943-1957 73,697.27 74,765.96 

Town of Leaside 

51/2% 1933-1944 4.029.24 1.895.79 

I also report that no income was received from certain non-trustee securities 
which came to you from the Wallberg and Whitney bequests. 

The Bursar's records are well kept and all Endowment and Trust Funds properly 
accounted for. 

Yours faithfully, 

G. T. Clarkson, F.C.A., 

Auditor. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Balance Sheet, 30th June, 1936 

Funds and Liabilities 

General Endowment Schedule 1 $13,077,851 71 

Specific Endowments (Scholarships. Prizes. 

etc.) " 2 496.167 28 

Trust Funds " 3 5.544.482 61 

Pension and Retirement Funds " 4 984.344 61 

Annuity Debentures " 5 1.278.200 84 

Contingent Funds, etc " 6 257.308 44 

Fees paid in advance 3.020 00 

Royal College of Dental Surgeons 50,000 00 

$21,691,375 49 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 169 

Assets 

Site Lands, Buildings and Contents Schedule 7 $11,977,913 55 

Unproductive Lands '" 8 58,622 40 

Leased Properties '" 9 824,365 71 

Investments, Cash and Accounts Receivable.. "' 10 8,013,419 59 

Royal Ontario Museum Investment 248,376 30 

Ontario Government Annuities ( 16 George V, Cap. 69) 95,818 86 

Ontario Government Annuities ( 18 George V, Cap. 55) 462,286 69 

Superintendent's Stores Appendix IV 10,572 39 

$21,691,375 49 

NOTE: This statement does not include any assets or liabilities of The Toronto Conservatory 
of Music. 

SCHEDULE 1 

General Endowment 
Additions for 1935-36: 
Annuity debentures: 

Portion of 1935-36 instalments reducing principal: 

Twenty-seventh instalment, issue of July. 1909 $ 14,587 04 

Twenty-fifth instalment, issue of January, 1911 3,507 00 

Twenty-fifth instalment, issue of January, 1911 8,094 00 

Twenty-first instalment, issue of April, 1915 2,477 48 

Twelfth instalment, issue of July, 1924 6,446 10 

Seventh instalment, issue of January, 1929 32,420 93 

$ 67,532 55 

Convocation Hall Advance: 

Restoration from proceeds of Wild Lands Sales, twenty-ninth 

instalment 30 00 

Lands and buildings: 

Economics Building and Site (formerly McMaster 
University) purchased for $100,000— 

Area of land. 59.125 sq. feet, taken into account ^/ 

40c per foot $ 23,650 00 

Remainder of cost attached to building (Schedule 7) 76,350 00 

-$100,000 00 

Site assigned to St. Michael's College for its Arts building, 

90,552 sq. feet now taken into account Co 40c per foot..$ 36.220 80 
Less valuation formerlv attached to this land while 

under lease as Park lots (Schedule 9) 16,081 00 

20,139 80 

Library proper: 

Additions for year less depreciation (Schedule 7) 22,682 54 

$ 210,384 89 

Return of 30th June. 1935 12,867,466 82 



Return of 30th June. 1936 $13,077,851 71 

SCHEDULE 2 

Specific Endowments 

{Scholarships, Prizes, etc.) 

A. A. A. S. Scholarship ( Physics, etc.) $2,350 00 

Aggett, Harvey. Memorial (Applied Science) 1.657 46 

Aikins (English Literature) 5.169 49 

Alexander Lectureship ( English Literature) 14,643 40 

All Souls' Historical Essay Prize 2.983 06 

Armstrong. George H., ( History ) 2.284 48 

B. A. A. S., Medals, etc 13 08 

Balfour Lectureship (Surgery) 4,679 37 

Balmer, Jean (Science) 1.252 73 

Bankers' (Political Science) 1,315 11 

Baptie. Margaret W., (Medicine and Science) 4,047 47 

Bastedo, Alma Anderson, Memorial Prize (English) 512 58 

Blake (Matriculation) 31,206 72 

Blake (Science and Moderns) 3,750 00 

Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company (Applied Science) 1.50 00 

Booth (University Schools) 1,000 51 

Brickner, Rabbi (Social Science) 1,034 11 



170 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Brock. Margaret A., (Matriculation, English and History) 1,030 63 

Brown, George. Memorial (Medical Science) 11,979 11 

Brown. George (Modern Languages) 1,128 34 

Bruce, Robert (Arts and Medicine ) 1,371 76 

Chappell, Walter F., Prize (Medicine or Surgery) 501 77 

Cockburn, G. R. R., (Greek) 1,050 00 

Cody, Florence ( Matriculation ) 2,523 59 

Cody, Henry John (Matriculation) 2.524 93 

Cody. Maurice, Memorial (Modern History) 3,028 14 

Cody, Maurice, Memorial Prize 1,220 41 

Cody. Maurice. Memorial (University Schools) 259 97 

Coleman Medal (Geology) 501 15 

Copp, John, Memorial Fund (Medicine) 5,032 42 

Crawford. Allan Rudyard ( University Schools) 525 00 

Crawford. Henry Job (University Schools) 1,049 61 

Darling & Pearson Prize (Architecture) 100 00 

De Lury, Alfred T., (Mathematics) 3,546 37 

Dickenson, Marion £., ( Household Science) 6,515 04 

Dunlap, David, Memorial ( Psychology) 1,225 00 

Findlay, J. A., (Mechanical Engineering) 1,893 81 

Fletcher- Johnston Memorial Prize ( Latin ) 10 00 

Fulton, Alexander T., (Mathematics and Science) 3,351 30 

Gibson ( Matriculation ) 3,798 07 

Gibson ( Pass Matriculation) 4,975 68 

Glen Mawr Old Girls' Association (English and History) 2,302 08 

Goldsmith, Perry ( Oto-Laryngology ) 3.062 33 

Grasett Memorial ( Classics ) 5,276 50 

Hardie, William (Matriculation) 2,300 00 

Harris. James (Matriculation, University College) 26.052 28 

Hastings (Public Health and Nursing) 10,725 34 

Henderson. Joseph, Memorial (Matriculation) 2,223 24 

Hendry, William John ( Obstetrics) 3,009 54 

Hollywood Theatre Prizes (French) 50 00 

Hutton, Maurice ( Classics) 5,442 32 

International Mathematical Congress, 1924 (Medals) 2,604 11 

Irwin. Herbert W., Memorial (Modern Languages) 1,035 18 

Isserman, Rabbi, Prize (Social Science) 831 51 

Jenkins (Engineering) 400 00 

Keenan, Mary, Award (Political Science) 200 00 

Kennedy, George ( Philosophy ) 3 89 

Kennedy, Sarah (Household Economics) 3 89 

Khaki University Memorial 3,218 52 

Laurier, Sir Wilfrid. Memorial (French) 2,222 61 

Lawler, Gertrude, Memorial (English and History) 3,149 27 

Lawler, Gertrude. Prize (English » 303 97 

Lister Prize ( Surgery) 5,065 61 

Lyle Medal (Orientals) 623 82 

McCaul Medal (Classics) 536 12 

McCharles. AEneas. Prize 19.903 78 

McCrae. John (Matriculation) 10,811 84 

Macdonald, John (Philosophy) 2,280 00 

Mackenzie, Alexander, Memorial (Political Science) 16,425 00 

Mackenzie, J. J.. Fellowship (Pathology) 5.721 00 

McLean, J. S., (Matriculation. University College) 8.150 00 

MacLennan-MacLeod Memorial Prize (Applied Science) 512 50 

MacMurchy, Angus, Medal (Law ) 1.000 09 

McPhedran, Alexander, Research Fellowship (Medicine) 29.681 99 

Marfleet. Pearson Kirkman, Lectureship 7.886 38 

Mickle. Charles, Fellowship 28,875 49 

Mickle. Ellen. Fellowship 28,953 95 

Moss (Qassics) 2,000 00 

Mulock, Mary (Classics) 2.838 74 

Mulock. William (Classics and Mathematics) 2.000 00 

Neelands. Florence M., Prize (French) 511 25 

Nesbitt. Wallace, Medals (University Schools) 573 58 

Nipissing Research Fellowship (Mining) 20,919 50 

Ontario Hockey Association. War Memorial (Matriculation ) 2.025 00 

Pan-Hellenic Association Prizes (University College) 150 00 

Peters, George A., (Surgery) 3.650 58 

Porter, T. M., (University Schools) 6.017 08 

Porter, T. M., (Corrigan gift) University Schools 1.000 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 171 

Prince of Wales (Matriculation) 1,000 00 

Quebec Bonne Entente Prize (French) 1,000 00 

Ramsay, William (Physics) 1,123 52 

Ramsay, William (Political Economy) 1,263 87 

Reeve, Anna Howe, Prize (Household Science) 672 65 

Reeve. R. A., Prize ( Medicine) 50 00 

Richardson, James H., Research Fellowship (Anatomy) 10,000 00 

Riddell ( Law) 30 00 

Rossin, Julius (Modern Languages) 1,000 00 

Rowell. Langford (Law) 1,012 06 

Rowell, Langford ( University Schools) 2,000 00 

Saddington, Ronald S., Medal (Pathology) 2 10 

St. Margaret's College Alumnae (Social Science) 75 00 

St. Margaret's College Alumnae Prize (Public Speaking) 609 54 

Simpson. Robert. Company (Essay Contest) 75 00 

Squair French Prose Prize 310 16 

Starr Bequest ( Medals ) 7,693 83 

Strang, Hugh Innis. Memorial (Classics) 2,783 20 

Toronto Women's League of United Synagogue Prize (Medicine) 50 00 

Tracy (Philosophy) 892 07 

Ubukata (Japanese students) 10,884 02 

University College Alumni Scholarship (Matriculation) 50 00 

University College French Society Prize 25 00 

Vander Smissen (German) 2,670 40 

Wickett, Morley (Matriculation, English and History) 2,254 67 

Wilson, Daniel (Natural Science) 2,000 00 

Wright, Ramsay ( Zoology ) 17,506 87 

Wrong. George M.. (Modem History) 3,563 46 

Young Memorial (Philosophy) 5,848 31 



Ledger Balances on 30th June, 1936 $496,167 28 

Return of 30th June, 1935 $491,260 31 

Additions to funds during year ( including income 

from investments) 28.931 77 

Interest written to endowTnents 5.992 43 

526,184 51 

Expended for scholarships, prizes, etc 30,017 23 



Return of 30th Junf', 1936 $4%,167 28 

SCHEDULE 3 

Trust Funds 

Banting Research Foundation $713,215 22 

Banting Research Foundation (Reserve) 6,139 01 

Canadian Dental Association 14 65 

Canadian National Committee for Mental Hygiene 1,309 36 

Carnegie Corporation, Educational Research 5,762 12 

Carnegie Corporation. Language Study 6.438 82 

Carnegie Corporation, Library, University College 3,228 37 

Carnegie Corporation. Professorship in Physics 3.022 50 

Carnegie Corporation, Fine Art Lectureship 2,424 00 

Carnegie Corporation, Workmen's Educational Association 2,458 86 

Connaught Laboratories Research 200.000 00 

Dental Research 127 37 

Dunlap Bequest (Medical Research) 110.802 36 

Eaton Endow-ment ( Medicine » 55.554 92 

Engineering Society Donation 173 16 

Fairclough, William Erving. Memorial 25,086 17 

Fasken, David, Trust 4,607 05 

Forster, J. W. L.. Fine Art Donation 122 27 

Fulford Estate Donation 3,088 16 

Hamilton, R. J.. Security Deposit 1.970 80 

Honor, John, Bequest (Arts) 9.983 50 

Horton. John Hughes, Bequest (not allocated) 777 24 

Hoskin, John. Bequest (Residences) 12.357 39 

Insulin Committee. Surplus 730,193 88 

Langton, John, Memorial 30 00 

Library Funds: 

Abbott Dental 609 65 



172 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

King Alfred Millenary 10,138 46 

Psychology^ 62 46 

Phillips Stewart 1.505 28 

John Squair (French) No. 1 1.000 00 

John Squair (French) No. 2 1.009 41 

Graduates' Deposits 2.971 43 

Massey Foundation 250,412 75 

Massey-Treble Bequest. Household Science 26,521 48 

Medical Research. Banting 146.729 66 

Medical Research. Best 79,577 30 

McLennan. Sir John. Bequest (Scientific Research) 5.000 00 

Ontario Archaeology' — Special Research 705 34 

Porter. T. M.. Bequest 11.252 70 

Reeve. R. A.. Bequests (not allocated ) 17,779 43 

Rockefeller (Medical Endo\NTnent ) 1.045,182 15 

Rockefeller ( Hygiene Endowment ) 858,099 50 

Rockefeller ( Child Research ) 1 53 

Rockefeller (School of Nursing i 24 

Rutherford. Dr. James P.. ( Medical Research ) 5.818 89 

Seldon. Lauretta M.. Bequest .52 03 

Simpson. Mar>- A.. Bequest 98 32 

Standard Brands Research (Chemistry) 263 72 

Stewart. John A.. ( Pernicious Anaemia ) 2.276 39 

Walker. E. C, Bequest ' Residences) 56.143 07 

Walker. J. Harrington. Bequest (Residences) 30.973 25 

\^ allberg. E. A.. Memorial 879.846 71 

Wallberg, E. A.. Memorial (Loan Fund ) 2.569 57 

Whitney. E. C Bequest 199.774 22 

\^intercorbyn. Mrs. E. A.. Bequest 9.220 49 

Ledger balances on 30th June. 1936 S5,544,482 61 

Return of 30th June. 1935 S5.408.782 29 

Additions to funds during year (including income from investments) 720.744 55 

Interest written to endowments 54.217 91 

$6,183,744 75 

Expenditures and transfers from funds 639.262 14 

Return of 30th June. 1936 $5,544,482 61 



SCHEDULE 4 
Pension and Retirement Funds 

1. Retirement Fund (Old Plant : 

At credit of account on 30th June, 1935 $75,074 78 

Contributions during year 1,995 00 

Interest credited 3,509 90 

$80,579 68 
Withdrawals 24.014 07 

$56,565 61 

2. Pension Fund (Academic! (Commenced 1 July. 1929): 

At credit of account on 30th June. 1935 , $310,825 46 

Contributions during year 46,640 00 

Interest credited 15,286 80 

$372,752 26 
Withdrawals 9.892 85 

362,859 41 

3. Pension Fund (Employees) (Commenced 1 October. 1929) : 

At credit of account on 30th June. 1935 $362,662 12 

Contributions during year 67.603 56 

Interest credited 16.437 81 

$446,703 49 

Withdrawals 12,483 90 

434,219 59 

4. Estimated accrued liability as per Actuary's report at quinquennial revaluation 

in 1934 '. 130,700 00 

Return of 30th June. 1936 $984,344 61 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 173 

SCHEDULE 5 

Annuity Debentures 

Issue of July. 1909. S500.000. repayable in forty equal annual amount? of S25.260 each, 

Value as on 30th June. 1936. of the thirteen outstanding instalments $252,237 12 

Issue of January. 1911. under 1 George V. Cap. 80. for construction of Pathological 
building. S130.000. repayable in forty equal annual amounts of S6.568 each, 

Value as on 30th June. 1936. of the fifteen outstanding instalments 73,023.00 

Accrued on 30th June. 1936. of twentv-sixth payment and charged to Revenue, 

1935-36 '. 3,284 GO 

Issue of January. 1911. under 1 George V. Cap. 80, as a grant towards construction of 
Toronto General Hospital. S300.000. repayable in fortv equal annual amounts of 
$15,157 each. 

Value as on 30th June. 1936. of the fifteen outstanding instalments 168.514 00 

Accrued on 30th June. 1936, of twentv-gixlh payment and charged to Revenue, 

1935-36 7,578 50 

Issue of April. 1915. under R.S.O., 1914. Cap. 279, to provide for the payment of 
$100,000 to the Hart A. M'assey Estate towards the Gymnasium portion of Hart 
House, $110,000. repayable in forty equal annual amounts of $5,975 each. 

Value as on 30th June. 1936. of the nineteen outstanding instalments 75.245 12 

Accrued on 30th June. 1936. of twentv-second payment and charged to Revenue, 

1935-36 '. ' 1,244 80 

Issue of July. 1924, under R.S.O., 1914, Cap. 279, for construction of Forestry building. 
$124,622. repayable in twenty equal annual amounts of $10,000 each. 

Value as on 30th June. 1936. of the eight outstanding instalments 64.632 10 

Issue of January. 1929. under R.S.O.. 1927. Cap. 337. for construction of a new building 
for Pathology and allied departments (Banting Institute) $800,000. repayable in 
twenty equal annual amounts of 364.193 each. 

Value as on 30th June. 1936. of the thirteen outstanding instalments 603.020 40 

Accrued on 30th June. 1936. of eighth payment and charged to Revenue. 1935-36. . 29.421 80 



$1,278.200 84 
SCHEDULE 6 
Contingent Funds, Etc. 

Contingent Fund (Investment Reserve): 

Balance brought forward from 1935 $172,161 84 

Organ Fund: 

Balance on 30th June. 1935 $3,850 34 

Expenditure on upkeep of orsan. less receipts 198 93 

3.651 41 

University Press: 

At credit of accounts as per Appendix HI 75,370 32 

Ontario College of Education: 

At credit of account ( Appendix V ) 43.529 87 

Sundrv- Legislative Grants: 

Administration Building: 

Balance brought forward from 1935 283 15 

Botanical Building: 

Balance brought forward from 1935 1 65 

David Dunlap Observatory (Construction Account) : 

Expended in 1935-36 $344 34 

Balance brought forward from 1935 581 69 



237 35 



Sundry ledger balances, items in suspense, etc.: 

Residence. Laboratory- and Key deposits $4,914 90 

Fire Loss Accounts 525 89 

Microscopes Purchase Account 2.716 60 

Medical Societv 25 00 



.182 39 
Workmen's Compensation Board deposit 231 45 



7,950 94 



Revenue deficit for 1935-36 as per Si-hedule 6a 1101.374 32 

Less balance at credit on 30th June. 1935 55.496 23 



$303,186 53 

45.878 09 
$257,308 44 



174 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



SCHEDULE 6a 

Revenue, 1935-36 

Receipts 

Estimate 

Legislative Grant, University Act, 1906 $500,000 00 

Legislative Grant, 60 Vict., Cap. 59 7.000 00 

Legislative Grant, 13-14 George V 10,000 00 

Fees, University and College, as detailed in Appendix 1 775,000 00 

Infirmary Receipts, Dentistry 30,000 00 

Interest : 

On Dominion and Provincial Government Bonds 

On Ontario Government Annuities 

On Debentures 

On Loans 

On Bank Balances 



Rentals: 

University Park ground leases. 

City of Toronto payment 

Business properties 

Sundry houses, etc 

Sundry land earnings 



y 150,000 00 



Men's Residences ' 

(General, $15,279.10; University College, $2,507.60) 

Women's Residences: "| 

(Whitney Hall, $45,308.30; St. George Street Group, $15,281.40* 

University College Women's Union: 

(Membership fees, $2,154; rooms and meals. $4,774.98) 



18,000 00 



64,500 00 



Central Power Plant: 

Wycliflfe, Victoria and Knox Colleges $27,689 12 

Royal Ontario Museum 13,869 35 

Sundry accounts 13,234 63 



Press and Book Department 

Photographic Service and Casual Revenue. 



50.000 00 

30,000 00 

5,000 00 



$1,639,500 00 

Special Legislative Grant for 1935-36 900,000 00 

Supplementary Grant 257,523 00 



Actual 

$500,000 00 

7,000 00 

10,000 00 

813,219 33 

27,834 95 

102,039 46 

29,702 09 

5.067 91 

2,785 07 

2,859 62 



11,393 00 
6.000 00 

10,492 93 

2,151 00 

165 00 



17,786 70 

63,589 70 

6,928 98 



54,793 10 

30,000 00 

23,648 28 

$1,727,457 12 

900,000 00 



$2,797,023 00 $2,627,457 12 



Expenditures 

Under appropriations as per Appendix II $2,787,023 00 $2,662,031 85 

Interest written to Scholarship and other funds 60,000 00 66,799 59 

$2,847,023 00 $2,728,831 44 

Receipts as above 2,627,457 12 

Excess of expenditures over receipts carried to Schedule 6 $ 101.374 32 



UNIVERSITY OF TOROMTO FOR 1936 175 

SCHEDULE 7 

Site Lands, Buildings and Contents 
Site Lands: 

2,423,843 sq. feet (fi forty cents per foot $969,537 20 

298,408 sq. feet 1/ cost price 406,435 53 

18.000 sq. feet fa estimate 40,000 00 

* 

2,740,251 sq. feet $1,415,972 73 

Buildings: 

Anatomical building S4S2.388 37 

Baldwin House 12.000 00 

Banting Institute 813.129 93 

Biological building 129.745 30 

Botanical building 516.998 35 

Chemical building 77.469 88 

Convocation Hall 214.866 22 

Dental building 350.000 00 

Economics building 76.350 00 

Electrical building 346.699 89 

Engineering building 50.000 00 

Forestry- building 122,359 86 

Geodetic Observatory building 12.000 27 

Hart House < not appraised ) 

Household Science building 455,000 00 

Hygiene and Public Health building 826.865 34 

Ubrary building 327.425 50 

McLennan Laboratory 363.945 85 

Mechanical building 119.017 21 

Medical building 200,000 00 

Men's Residences 217,670 04 

Military Studies building 8.239 47 

Mining building 384.736 89 

Mill building 229.972 52 

Ontario College of Education 703.390 67 

President's House 38.767 62 

Press buUding 1 00 

Psychology buildings 22.333 26 

Simcoe Hall 399.055 10 

University College building 450.000 00 

University C&Uege Women's Union 70.059 19 

Women's Residences: 

\t%itney Hall 487.988 37 

Hutton House 24.723 77 

St. George Street Properties: 

Numbers 43 30.054 25 

45 39.079 67 

47 10.172 95 

49 25.007 51 

75 23.590 00 

% 22.692 60 

98 16,708 84 

100 17.776 93 

106 10.034 15 

$8,728,316 77 

Library $607,391 11 

Organ 24,000 00 

Sundry Departmental Equipment 375,153 99 

Furniture and Furnishings, various buildings 44.089 21 

Arena 223.070 40 

Athletic Field Stadium and equipment 11.817 88 

.\ura Lee Grounds and equipment (Ontario College of Education) 17.276 27 

Gymnasium equipment 7.620 19 

Surveying Practice Camp. Lutterworth Township, (land. $1,250; buildings, etc., 

$10,000) 1U50 00 

David Dunlap Observatory (land. $41,750; buildings. $163,700; telescope, dome. etc.. 

$225,000) 430,450 00 

Connaught Laboratories (Farm, buildings and equipment) 81.500 00 

Connaught Laboratories ( Hygiene building plant ) 1 00 



176 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Central Power Plant 1 00 

Printing Plant 1 00 

General Museum Specimens 1 00 

Dining Hall equipment 1 00 

Total valuation $11,977,913 55 

Return of 30th June. 1935 Sll.855,312 81 

Additions thereto as per Schedule 1 : 

Lands and Buildings 100.000 00 

Library proper: 

Value of additions for 1935-36 as reported by 

the Librarian $41,467 83 

Less depreciation ffi 3% on 8626.176.40 18,785 29 

22.682 54 

$11,977,995 35 

Contra 

Women's Residences Furniture written down by application of credit from Sale of 

Wild Lands set apart for Women's Residences $81 80 

Return of 30th June, 1936 $11,977,913 55 

SCHEDULE 8 

Unproductive Lands 

U.C.C. block on King Street $50,425 40 

Vacant land in Port Hope 8,045 00 

Endowment lands unsold in various townships 152 00 

(No transactions during vear) 
Return of 30th June, 1936 $58,622 40 

SCHEDULE 9 

Leased Properties 

Land leased to City of Toronto $120,000 00 

Park Lots leased (including Federated Colleges Sites) 402,992 20 

Toronto business properties 283,000 00 

Spadina Avenue houses (Nos. 719-721 ) 8.023 51 

Caradoc Farm 3,000 00 

$817,015 71 

Rentals and City of Toronto payment accrued 7,295 00 

Rentals past due 55 00 

$824,365 71 

Return of 30th June, 1935 $805,942 91 

Site assigned to St. Michael's College for its Arts building, as per 

Schedule 1 20,139 80 

$826,082 71 
Decrease in rentals accrued and past due 1.717 00 

Return of 30th June, 1936 $824,365 71 

SCHEDULE 10 

Investments, Cash and Accounts Receivable 

Dominion of Canada Bonds and guaranteed issues $2,567,322 04 

Interest accrued 8.352 78 

Interest outstanding on purchases 262 36 

$2,575,937 18 

Province of Ontario Bonds and guaranteed issues $2,644,867 44 

Interest accrued 17,917 33 

2,662,784 77 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 177 

Other Government Bonds S269.676 06 

Interest accrued 966 99 

270,643 05 

Municipal debentures $531,297 32 

Interest accrued 1,794 54 

533,091 86 

University of Toronto debentures (guaranteed) 603,020 40 

Toronto Conservatory of Music debentures 825,000 00 

Interest accrued 414 38 

25,414 38 

Corporation debentures 59,681 00 

Canadian Pacific Railway and other stocks 265,085 00 

Investments in trust for Banting Research Foundation $712,506 64 

Interest outstanding on purchases 11 51 

712,518 15 

Loan to Athletic Association 65,000 00 

Loan to Hart House 7,000 00 

Accounts Receivable: 

University Press S944 57 

Department of Photography 122 62 

Labour and material 6.319 50 

Central Power Plant 28,729 15 

$36,115 84 
Less Royal Ontario Museum balances and miscellaneous items 

at credit 19.938 05 

16,177 79 

Canadian Bank of Commerce, on deposit 217,066 01 



$8,013,419 59 



Transactions, 1935-36 

Inwards 

Dominion and Provincial Government Bonds $96,151 36 

Municipal debentures 7.592 75 

University of Toronto debentures 32.420 93 

Corporation debentures 80.013 59 

Sundry stocks 20,596 87 

Banting Research Foundation Investments 36.333 06 

Withdrawals from Canadian Bank of Commerce 4.359.100 76 

Decrease in accounts outstanding 9.861 67 

$4,642,070 99 

Outicards 

Dominion and Provincial Government Bonds . . $457,708 24 

Municipal debentures 67 00 

Corporation debentures 55.853 59 

Sundry- stocks 10.596 87 

Banting Research Foundation Investments 45.<85 46 

Deposits in Canadian Bank of Commerce 4,235,165 78 

Increase in accrued revenue 2,833 69 

4.808.010 63 

$165,939 64 
Return of 30th June. 1935 7,847,479 95 

Return of 30th June, 1936 $8,013,419 59 



]78 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

APPENDIX 1 

Fees, 1935-36 

Balance brought forward. 1934-35 $182 00 

Total of fees collected. 1935-36 993,905 43 



$994,087 43 



Distribution thereof: 

Sundry refunds during year $4,849 85 

Share of fees paid to the following: 

Hart House 37,269 75 

Students' Administrative Council 16,013 00 

Medical Society 2,401 00 

Dental Students' Parliament 1,536 00 

Foresters" Club 114 00 

Graduate Students Union 459 00 

University College Literary and Athletic Society 1,218 00 

University College Women's Undergraduate Association 1,018 00 

Medical Women's Undergraduate .Association 96 00 

Teachers" Course Association 958 00 

Royal College of Dental Surgeons 1,915 00 

St. MichaeFs College ( Household Science ) 130 00 

Toronto Conservatory of Music 560 00 

Hospitals: 

Toronto General $9,500 00 

Toronto General (Burnsidel 1,040 00 

$10,540 00 

St. MichaeFs 1.835 00 

Sick Children's 1.270 00 

Toronto Western 1.080 00 

14,725 00 

Credited to Sundry Accounts: 

Ontario College of Education 56.062 95 

University College Women's Union 2,154 00 

School of Nursing 9,175 00 

St. George's School for Child Study 2,627 00 

Microscopes Account 1,659 00 

Laboratory Deposits 22,907 55 

Fees paid in advance for 1936-37 3,020 00 

Balance to Revenue Account (Schedule 6a) 813,219 33 

$994,087 43 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



179 



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REPORT OF THE 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



181 



CLASSIFICATION OF SERVICES 



Tuition, etc.: 

Arts 

Commerce and Finance 

Medicine 

Applied Science 

Dentistry 

Education 

Education (University Schools). . . . 

Forestry 

Music 

Household Science 

Graduate Studies 

University Extension 

Social Science 

Pharmacy 

School of Nursing 

St. George's School 

Registration 

Matriculation 

Ad Eundem 

Examinations 

Degrees and Honour Certificates 

Laboratory Supplies 

Library 

Physical Education Diploma 

Med. Exam, and Phy. Tr. (Men) 

Med. Exam and Phy. Tr. (Women). . . 

Penalties 

Women's Union 

Women's Undergraduate Association 

University College 

Women's Undergraduate Association 

Medicine 

Hart House 

Students' Administrative Council. . . 

Literary and Athletic Society 

Medical Society 

Dental Students' Parliament 

Foresters' Club 

Graduate Students' Union 

Teachers' Course Association 

Microscopes 

Laboratory Deposits 



Gross 
Receipts 



Other 
Refunds Deductions 



$118,989 

19,738 

190,978 

151,499 

43,186 

29,698 

26,509 

4,522 

755 

6,359 

12,335 

65,927 

10,118 

15,000 

9,233 

2,627 

2,710 

1,095 

810 

117,559 

19,472 

5,877 

37,922 

275 

7,685 

1,320 

3,887 

2,154 



50 

00' 

73 

42 

53 

00 

95 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 1 

50' 

00 

00 

00' 

50 

50 

50 

00 

00 

00' 

00 

00! 



1,018 OOi 

96 00 

37,269 751 

16,017 001 

1,218 OOi 

2,401 00 

1,544 00 

114 00 

459 00 

958 00 

1,659 00 

22,907 55 



$951 00 



115 00 

45 82 

146 53 

145 00 



25 00 

27 00 

1,694 00 

49 00 



58 00 



10 00 



1,083 00 

170 00 

21 00 

44 00 



19 00 



234 50 



4 00 



8 00 



$993,905 43 $4,849 85 



14,725 00 



1,915 00 
29,553 00 
26,509 80 



560 00 
130 00 



9,175 00' 
2,627 00' 



2,154 00 
1,018 DO 



96 

37,269 

16,013 

1,218 

2,401 

1,536 

114 

459 

958 

1,659 

22,907 



Net 

Amount 



$118,038 50 

19,738 00 

176,138 73 

151,453 60 

41,125 00 



4,522 00 
195 00 

6,204 00 
12,308 00 
64,233 00 
10,069 00 
15,000 00 



2,710 


50 


1,085 00 


810 


00 


116,476 


00 


19,302 


50 


5,856 


50 


37,878 50 


275 


00 


7,666 


00 


1,320 


00 


3,652 


50 











$172,998 251 $816,057 33 



RECAPITULATION 



University Fees Proper 


$867,924 93 

125,980 50 

182 00 


$3,898 85 
951 00 


$172,998 25 


$691,027 83 


University College Fees Proper 

Balance brought forward, 1934-35 


125,029 50 






182 00 










$994,087 43 


$ 4,849 85 


$172,998 25 


$816,239 33 


Less paid in advance for 1936-37 








3,020 00 










$813,219 33 







182 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX II 
Revenue Expendiiures, 1935-36 



Appropriation 



Supple- 
mentary 



Unused 



Total 



I. Administration: 

1. Salaries $110,650 00 

2. Pensions and Retiring Allow- 

ances 102,950 00 

3. President's Office 750 00 

4. Bursar's Office 5,400 00 

5. Registrar's Office 5,950 00 

6. Superintendent's Office 4,600 00 

7. Convocation and Simcoe Halls. 12,525 00 

8. President's House 100 00 



II. Library: 

9. Salaries 

10. Maintenance 

11. Building 

III. 12. Royal Ontario Museum 

IV. Athletics, Physical Training, Mili 
tary Studies, etc.: 

13. Athletics and Physical Train- 

ing — Men 

14. Athletics and Physical Train 

ing — Women 

15. Health Service — Men 

16. Health Service — Women .... 

17. Military Studies 

18. Hart House (share of mainten 
ance) 

19. Women's Building (44 Hoskin 
Avenue) 

20. Military Studies Building . . 



Faculty of Arts: 

21. Salaries 

22. Mathematics 

23. Applied Mathematics 

24. Physics 

25. Astronomy 

26. Geology 

27. Mineralogy 

28. Chemistry 

29. Biology 

30. Botany 

31. History 

32. Anthropology 

33. Archaeology 

34. Fine Art 

34a. Geography 

35. Political Economy. . . 

36. Philosophy 

37. Psychology 

38. Italian and Spanish. . 

39. University College 

ments 

University College 

Expenses • . ■ 

University College Building 
McLennan Laboratory 

(Physics) 

Chemical Building 

44. Biological Building 

45. Botanv Buildine 



$242,925 00 



$58,270 00 

49,900 00 

4,870 00 



$113,040 00 



$70,000 00 



17,610 00 

6,600 00 
7,450 00 
4,750 00 
3,580 00 

9,000 00 

1,180 00 
1,375 00 



$51,545 00 



$734,865 00 

650 00 

800 00 

9,750 00 

2,600 00 

1,300 00 

1,000 00 

8,350 00 

5,040 00 

7,550 00 

1,100 00 

125 00 

400 00 

975 00 



Depart- 



40. 
41. 

42. 

43. 



General 



2,450 00 
150 00 

3,825 00 
225 00 

600 00 

1,600 00 
11,875 00 

6,175 00 

4,800 00 

5,425 00 

5,675 00 



1 16 



t5,374 77 
2,382 91 



954 22 

254 74 

824 29 

1851 56 

52 68 



1 16 



$11,695 17 



[,475 91 



88 66 



131 25 



$88 66 



$1,607 16 



$2,519 20 



1,010 94 
529 56 



393 24 



132 91 
120 76 

46 82 

376 03 
53 94 



$393 24 



$2,270 96 



3 SO 02 



103 77 



$105,275 23 

100,567 09 

751 16 

4,445 78 

5,695 26 

3.775 71 

10,673 44 

47 32 



.$231,230 99 



$56,794 09 

49,988 66 

4,738 75 



$111,521 50 



$67,480 80 



16,599 06 

6,070 44 
7,843 24 
4,617 09 
3,459 24 

8,953 18 

803 97 
1,321 06 



$49,667 28 



$19,365 80 

459 42 

109 02 

394 39 

236 44 

598 94 

.521 12 

91 48 

522 60 

33 93 

35 99 

94 02 

4 48 

85 24 



82 09 
66 57 
68 01 
22 92 

294 31 



741 11 

358 86 

1.665 40 

154 07 

571 62 



$715,499 20 

190 58 

690 98 

9,3.55 61 

2,363 56 

701 06 

478 88 

8,258 52 

4,517 40 

7,516 07 

1,064 01 

30 98 

395 52 

889 76 

380 02 

2,367 91 

83 43 

3,756 99 

202 08 

305 69 

1,703 77 
11,133 89 

5,816 14 
3,134 60 
5,270 93 
5,103 38 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



183 



Revenue Expenditures, 1935-36 — Continued 





Appropriation 


Supple- 
mentary 


Unused 


Total 


46. Baldwin House (Historv) .... 


$ 2,895 00 
1,080 00 
2,160 00 

1,180 00 

10,025 00 

3,400 00 

4,000 00 




$ 128 92 
283 22 
127 28 

275 73 


$ 2,766 08 
796 78 


47. No. 43 St. George St 




48. No. 45 St. George St. (Law) . . 

49. No. 47 St. George St. (Applied 
Mathematics) 




2,032 72 
904 27 




50. Economics Building 


921 52 


10 946 52 


51. Psychology Building 

52. David Dunlap Observatory . . . 


898 25 
625 78 


2 501 75 




3,374 22 




$842,045 00 


$1,405 31 


$28,917 01 


$814,533 30 





Appro- 
priation 


Supple- 
mentary Unused 


Eaton and 

Rockefeller 

Funds 


Total 


VI. Faculty of Medicine: 

53. Salaries 


$249,085 00 




$8,036 27 


$78,278 50 


$319,327 23 


53a. Post Graduate Courses. . . . 


$ 1,546 79 


1,546 79 
5,395 19 


54. Anatomv ... 


5,600 00 
7,025 00 
2,250 00 
2,400 00 

5,400 00 
3,650 00 

2,220 00 


204 81 
537 06 
307 61 
279 00 

135 18 
145 00 

12 55 




55. Pathology and Bacteriology . 

56. Pathological Chemistry 






6,487 94 






1 942 39 


57. Pharmacy and Pharmacology 

58. Bio-Chemistry (including 

Zvmologv) 




2,121 00 




5,264 82 


59. Physiology 






3,505 00 


50. Hygiene and Preventive 
Medicine . . 




"4,794 61 


2,207 45 


61. Medicine 




4,794 61 


62. Surgery 


2,450 00 
500 00 
500 00 
170 00 
100 00 
50 00 




1,136 71 

109 74 

422 55 

3 81 

3 05 

50 00 


1,313 29 


63. Obstetrics and Gynaecology.. 

64. Ophthalmology 




390 26 






77 45 


65. Oto-Laryngology 

66. Therapeutics 






166 19 






96 95 


67. Psvchiatrv 






68. Medical Jurisprudence 








69. Radiology 

70. Art Service 


750 00 
4,100 00 
4,500 00 
8,450 00 
22,300 00 
5,185 00 
9,6(J0 00 


82 






750 82 


155 13 
1,644 26 




3,944 87 


71. General Expenses 






2,855 74 


72. Medical Building 

73. Banting Institute 


563 97 
412 40 
523 11 
775 62 




7,886 03 






21,887 60 


74. Anatomical Building 

75. Hygiene Building 


4,661 89 






8,824 38 










$336,285 00 


$1,547 61 


$15,457 83$ 83,073 11 


$405,447 89 


VII. School of Hygiene: 

76. Salaries 





1 


$39,116 20 
1,783 03 


$39,116 20 


77. Maintenance - - 




1,783 03 
















$40,899 23 


40,899 23 



Appro- 
priation 



Supple- 
mentary 



Unused 



Total 



VIII. Faculty of Applied Science: 

78. Salaries 

79. Electrical Engineering . . . 

80. Mechanical Engineering. . 

81. Civil Engineering: 
Municipal and Structural 



$270,380 00 
3,100 00 
2,700 00 

725 00 



$8,001 90 
813 80 
594 23 

429 12 



.$262,378 10 
2,286 20 
2,105 77 

295 88 



184 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Revenue Expenditures, 1935-36 — Continued 



Appro- 
priation 



Supple- 
mentary 



Unused 



Total 



82. Civil Engineering: 
Surveying and Geodesy 

83. Mining Engineering 

84. Metallurgical Engineering 

85. Chemical Engineering and Applied 
Chemistry 

86. School of Architecture 

87. Engineering Drawing 

88. Applied Physics 



IX. 



89. General Expenses 

90. Photographic Service 

91. Mining Building (including Mill 

Building) 

92. Engineering Building 

93. Electrical Building (including 
Mechanical Building and Wind 
Tunnel) 

94. Geodetic Observatory Building. 



Faculty of Dentistry: 

95. Salaries 

95a. Post Graduate Courses . . 

96. Laboratory and Infirmary 
Supplies, etc 

97. General Expenses 

98. Dental Building 



Faculty of Household Science: 

99 . Salaries 

100. Household Science 

101. Food Chemistry 

102. General Expenses 

103 Household Science Building. 



XI. Faculty of Forestry: 

104. Salaries 

105. Maintenance 

106. Forestry Building. 



3,410 00 

1,400 00 

6.50 00 

7,100 00 
905 00 
400 00 
900 00 

3,075 00 
8,350 00 

10,225 00 
5,900 00 



7,4.50 00 
475 00 



$327,145 00 



$88,455 00 



23,000 00 

2,250 00 

13,500 00 



$127,205 00 



.$28,750 00 
3,150 00 
1,900 00 
2,000 00 
5,100 00 



$ 40,900 00 



$23,430 00 
'?.350 00 
2,335 00 



528,115 00 



28.5 00 



285 00 



173 63 

74 63 

143 85 

139 87 

139 66 

89 46 

49 69 

552 33 
474 07 

209 68 
445 50 



1,010 25 
25 33 



3,236 37 

1,325 37 

506 15 

6,960 13 
765 34 
310 54 
850 31 

2,522 67 
7,875 93 

10,015 32 
5,4.54 50 



6,439 75 
449 67 



$13,367 00 



$313,778 00 



$1,972 30 



2,527 77 

22 70 

823 06 



$86,482 70 
285 00 

20,472 23 

2,227 30 

12,676 94 



i,345 83 



$122,144 17 



1,014 75 
631 46 
169 37 
205 59 
563 37 



$ 2,584 54 



823 57 
197 72 
329 17 



$1,350 46 



$27,735 25 
2,518 54 
1,730 63 
1,794 41 
4.536 63 



$ 38,315 46 



$22,606 43 
2,1.52 28 
2,005 83 



,764 54 





Appro- 
priation 


Supple- 
mentary 


Unused 


Eaton and 

Rockefeller 

Funds 


Total 


XII. Faculty of Music: 


$1,750 00 
300 00 




$ 6 30 
217 41 




$1,743 70 


108 Maintenance • . . 




82 59 










$2,050 00 




$223 71 




$1,826 29 










XIII. School of Graduate Studies: 
109 Salaries 


.$3,900 00 
575 00 




$121 50 
188 66 




$3,778 50 








406 34 












$4,475 00 




$290 16 




$4,184 84 











UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



185 



Revenue Expenditures. 1934-35 — Continued 





Appro- 
priation 


Supple- 
mentary 


Unused 


Eaton and 

Rockfeller 

Funds 


Total 


XIV. School of Nursing: 

111. Salaries 


$19,580 00 

5,600 00 

1,250 00 

10,150 00 

5,260 00 


1 

} 
1 

J 




36,491 41 




112. Special Teaching 




113. School Maintenance 

114. Residence Maintenance . . . . 

115. Building — (No. 7 Queen's 
Park) 


41,491 41 






Proportion chargeable to 
Revenue 


($41,840 00) 
5,000 00 






36,491 41 


41,491 41 






XV. Social Science: 

116. Salaries 


$11,050 00 
850 00 




$237 75 
104 98 




$10,812 25 


117. Maintenance 




745 02 








$11,900 00 




$342 73 




$11,557 27 








XVI. 

118. Examinations, etc 


$20,500 00 




$1,473 54 




$19,026 46 








XVII. University Extension and 
Publicity: 
119. Salaries 


$17,000 00 
43,100 00 




$ 412 50 




$16,587 50 


120. Extension and Publicity 
Depts 


13,725 06 


56,825 06 












$60,100 00 


$13,725 06 


$ 412 50 




$73,412 56 


XVIII. Residences and Women's Union 

121. Men's Buildings 

122. Women's Buildings 

123. Housekeeping Account — 
Women's Buildings 


$15,440 00 
11,300 00 

53,850 00 




$1,558 33 
]009 49 

3,566 35 




$13,881 67 






10,290 51 






50,283 65 










$80,590 00 




$ 6,134 17 




$ 74,455 83 










XIX. 

124. Central Power Plant 


$ 149,500 00 




$10,317 62 




$139,182 38 















Appro- 
priation 


Supple- Unused 
mentary 


Total 


XX. Miscellaneous and General: 

125. Central Stores 


$ 4,050 00 

19,700 00 

17,300 00 

13,100 00 

20,000 00 

1,000 00 

3,000 00 

3,200 00 

4.700 00 
600 00 

3,100 00 
18,000 00 
20,000 00 




$ 232 50 
3,122 06 
1,406 46 
1,588 08 
2,166 05 


$ 3,817 50 


126. Grounds 




16,577 94 


127. Protective Service 




15,893 54 


128. Telephones 

129. Insurance 




11.511 92 
17,833 95 


130. Law Costs 

131. Auditor's Fees . . 


7 50 


1,007 50 
3,000 00 


132. Travelling Expenses 

133. Receptions to Societies and Uni- 
versity Visitors 

134. Convocation Expenses 

135. Aid to Publications and Soci- 
eties 






1,089 28 

3.137 72 
86 69 

285 76 
8.270. 00 
17.115 79 


2,110 72 
1,562 28 




513 31 




2,814 24 


136. Bursaries 




9,730 00 


137. Contingencies 




2,884 21 








$127,750 00 


7 50 $38,500 39 


$89,257 11 











186 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 





Appro- 
priation 


Supple- 
mentary 


Unused 


Total 


XXI. 138. Capital Account Charges 

XXII. 139. \ Special Research (including 
140. J Banting and Best) 


$119,653 00 
$26,300 00 






$119,653 00 


365 29 




$26,665 29 







Recapitulation 



Appro- 
priation 



Supple- 
mentary 



Unused 



Eaton and 

Rockefeller 

Funds 



Total 



Mu 



I. Administration 

II. Library 

III. Royal Ontario 

seum 

IV. Athletics, Physical 

Training, Military 
Studies, etc 

V. Faculty of Arts .... 

VI. Faculty of Medicine. 

VII. School of Hvgiene. . 

VIII. Faculty of Applied 

Science 

IX. Faculty of Dentistry 

X. Faculty of House- 

hold Science 

XI. Faculty of Forestry 

XII. Faculty of Music. 

XIII. School of Graduate. 

Studies 

XIV. School of Nursing. . 

XV. Social Science 

"V-VI. Examinations, etc. . 
A V'll. University Extension 

and Publicity. . . . 

XVIII. Residences and 

Women's Union. . 

XIX. Central Power Plant 

XX. Miscellaneous and 

General 

XXI. Capital Account 

Charges 

XXII. Special Research (in- 

cluding Banting 
and Best) 



Charged to Revenue. . . 

Charged to Eaton and 
Rockefeller Funds . 



Total expenditure as above . 



1242,925 00 
113,040 00 

70,000 00 



51,545 00 
842,045 00 
336,285 00 



$1 16 
88 66 



393 24 
1405 31 
1547 61 



$11,695 17 
1,607 16 

2,519 20 



2.270 96 
28,917 01 
15,457 83 



327,145 00 
127,205 00 

40,900 00 

28,115 00 

2,050 00 

4,475 00 

5,000 00 

11,900 00 

20,500 00 

60,100 00 

80,590 00 
149,500 00 

127,750 00 

119,653 00 



26,300 00 



$2,787,023 00 



124,991 15 



2,662,031 85 
160,463 75 



$2,822,495 60 



285 00 



13,725 06 



7 50 



365 29 



$ 17,818 83 



$83,073 11 
40,899 23 



13,367 00 
5,345 83 

2,584 54 

1,350 46 

223 71 

290 16 



342 73 

1,473 54 

412 50 

6,134 17 
10,317 62 

38,500 39 



142,809 98 
17,818 83 



124,991 15 



36,491 41 



$231,230 99 
111,521 50 

67,480 80 



49,667 28 
814,533 30 
405,447 89 

40,899 23 

313,778 00 
122,144 17 

38,315 46 

26,764 54 

1,826 29 

4,184 84 
41,491 41 
11,557 27 
19,026 46 

73,412 56 

74.455 83 
139,182 38 

89,257 11 

119,653 00 



26,665 29 



$ 160,463 75 



$2,822,495 60 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



187 



I. ADMINISTRATION 

1. Salaries 

(All salaries, except where otherwise stated, are for 12 months to 30 June. 1936. 
The figure following a minus sign after a salary indicates the reduction made in that salary in 
accordance with the schedule in force during the fiscal year 1935-36.) 



President's Office 

Hon. H. J. Cody. LL.D.. President, $15,000 — $2,255 $12,745 00 

Miss A. W. Patterson. President's Secretary (paid also $243.70 as 

Secretary, Faculty of Music) $2,500 — $61.20 2.438 80 

Bursar's Office 

F, A. Moure. Bursar, $6,500 — $305 $6,195 00 

Accounts Branch: 

C. E. Higginbottom. Accountant. $4,000 — $115 5.885 00 

J. A. Gair. Assistant. $2,000 — $45 1.955 00 

.Miss E. Long. Appropriations Ledger Qerk, $1,600— $35 1.565 00 

Miss R. Mahood. Assistant Appropriations Ledger Clerk, $1,050 — 

$21.25 1,028 75 

Clerks : 

Miss J. H. Branton. $1,350 — $28.75 1.321 25 

John Prince. $1,000 — $20 980 00 

Miss E. Crookshanks. $950 — $19 931 00 

Miss F. M. Quinlivan 800 00 

Miss V. Whitehead 800 00 

Fees Branch: 

Miss E. B. Goodwin. Chief Clerk. $2,000 — $45 1.955 00 

Gordon M. Grant. Cashier, 1 July to 28 Sept. (fi $100 per month. 

$299; 30 Sept. to 30 June (a $25 per week, $983.33 1.282 33 

Record Clerks: 

Mrs. Edith M. Hardy. $1,050 — $21.25 1.028 75 

Miss F. J. Rorke, $850 — $17 833 00 

Secretarial Branch: 

.Miss A. M. Gall. Chief Clerk. $2,050 — $46.50 2.003 50 

Miss M. Burns. Assistant. $1,600 — $35 1.565 00 

Miss M. Austin. Pensions Qerk, $1,550 — $33.75 1.516 25 

Miss H. Malone. Clerk. $1,050 — $21.25 L028 75 

Registrar's Office 

A. B. Fennell. Registrar. $4,850 — $149 $4,701 00 

A. T. Laidlaw. Assistant Registrar. $4,000 — $115 3.885 00 

Assistants: 

Miss A. MacGillivrav. $1,900 — $42.50 1.857 50 

Miss E. Hargreaves. $1,900 — $42.50 1,857 50 

Miss I. E. Fraser. $1J200 — $25 1.175 00 

Graduates' Register: 
Clerks : 

Miss B. G. Van Allen. $1,400 — $30 1.370 00 

Miss M. F. Thompson. $1,400 — $30 1,370 00 

Miss Dorothy Thayer. 1 month to 31 July @ $900 per annum 

(resigned) $75 — $1.50 73 50 

Miss J. L. Stephens. 11 mos. from 1 August @ $900 

$825 — $16.50 808 50 

Miss Ruth D. Wythe. $900 — $18 882 00 

Miss Margaret E. Smith 700 00 

Miss A. S. Meen. $1,650 — $36,25 1,613 75 

Miss F, L, Mathews, to 15 July rT; $1,050 (resigned) $43.75 — 88r. . 42 87 
Miss M. M. Lavell. llVs mos. from 15 July Cd $1,050. $1,006.25 — 

$20.36 985 89 

Miss E. M. Sharpe, Secretary to Registrar, $1,600 — $35 1.565 00 

Stenographers: 

Miss E. M. Fasken. $1,400 — $30 1,370 00 

Miss Dorothv Woods, $900 — $18 882 00 

Wm. Calladine. Filing Qerk 700 00 



$15,183 80 



$30,673 58 



$25,839 51 



188 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Superintendent's Office 

A. D. LePan, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, $6,500 — $305. . $6,195 00 

W. H. Bonus, Assistant Superintendent, $4,400 — $131 4,269 00 

Assistants : 

G. D. Maxwell, $3,400 — $91 3,309 00 

E. G. Moogk, $2,300 — $54 2,246 00 

J. Shortreed, $2,200 — $51 2,149 00 

W. L. D. Carnic, Chief Clerk, $2,300 — $54 2,246 00 

Miss M. D. Chisholm, Stenographer. $1,300 — $27.50 1.272 50 

Miss J. Bell, 6 mos. to 31 Dec. fa $1,400 (retired) $700 — $15 685 00 

Miss A. K. Wynn, $1,300 — $27.50 1,272 50 

Miss E. Nicklin, $1,300 — $27.50 1,272 50 

Miss J. Taylor, $950 — $19 931 00 

Miss R. M. Rankin, $900 — $18 882 00 

Miss M. E. Lee, $850 — $17 833 00 

Miss R. E. Cannon, 23 Oct. to 30 June (<^t $16 per week (paid also 

$245 as Clerical Assistant ) 573 34 



r28,135 84 



Miscellaneous 

J. B. Bickersteth, Warden, Hart House (with living valued @ $675) 
$4,500 — $135 

Leonard Smith, Bedel, also Attendant and Messenger, President's Office, 
$1,100 — $22.50 



2. Pensions and Retiring Allowances 



$4,365 00 
1,077 50 



$5,442 50 
$105,275 23 



University's contribution to Pension Funds for the year ending 30 
June, 1936: 

Remitted to Teachers' Insurance and Annuity Association, New York, 
for credit of retiring allowances funded there (original con- 
tributory plan ) 

Credited to Fund No. 2 (Academic, formerly non-contributory plan) 
Credited to Fund No. 3 (Administrative and Clerical Employees) .. 

Sundry annual allowances (voted separately and not chargeable to above 
funds) paid as detailed below: 

Sir Robert Falconer ($10,000 less amount charged to 

Pension Fund No. 2) $7,600 00 

J. T. Fotheringham 500 00 

A. Primrose 500 00 

H. H. Langton 400 00 

Mrs. A. C. Jones 600 00 

D. J. Clark 250 00 

Alex. Wilson 725 00 

Widow's allowances: 

Mrs. M. Hope Gillespie 900 00 

Mrs. Christian Lynn 375 00 

Mrs. Ellen L. Sinclair 350 00 



29,642 35 
32,000 00 
26,724 74 



$12,200 00 



$100,567 09 



3. President's Office 

Office supplies, postage, printing and incidentals: 

President H. J. Cody, sundry disbursements $24 % 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., transfer cases 7 21 

Postage 40 00 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 8 00 

University Association of Canada, encyclopedia 44 13 

University Press, printing and stationer}' 626 86 



$751 16 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



189 



4. Bursar's Office 

Oflfice supplies, postage, printing and incidentals ($2,762.46) : 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., electric machine, $243.20, main 

tenance service, $50.94 

Bernard Cairns Ltd., stamps and pads 

Copeland-Chatterson Ltd., ledger sheets and tabs 

Grand & Toy, cheques 

Might Directories Ltd., city directory, etc 

Office Specialty Mfg Co., folders, stool, transfer cases and basket.. 

Postage 

Ratcliffe & Ovey, stapler and staples 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 

Underwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd., maintenance service and paper 

University Press, printing and stationery , 

Accounts under $10 (2) 

The Bursar, disbursements: 

Meals for staff — overtime work, $173; hire of car for office 
business for one year, $75; exchange on cheques and postal 

notes, $12.06; sundries, $11.82 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $28.63; material, $4.82..., 
Clerical assistance ($623) : 

J. H. Birkin. 14 weeks 

Miss M. E. Kelly, 1-1/3 weeks 

Mrs. L McCormick, 17 weeks, 5 days 

Stamp taxes and bank service charges 



$294 


14 


28 


86 


38 


23 


221 


00 


23 


32 


105 61 


550 00 


15 


25 


33 


00 


44 


90 


1,092 


92 


9 90 


i 

271 


88 


33 45 


280 00 


16 


00 


327 


00 


1,060 32 



$4,445 78 



5. Registrar's Office 

Stationery and office supplies ($1,361.19) : 

Addressing Machine Supply Corporation, address plates and ribbon 

P. E. Hyde, subscriptions to daily papers 

Might Directories Ltd., city directory 

Mimeograph Co., machine, ink and stencils 

Murdock Stationery, carbons and ribbons 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. cards, folders and transfer cases 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 

E. G. Taylor, addressograph inspection 

Underwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd.. typewriter 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (4) 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $9.33; labour. $12.81; material, $3.40 

Clerical assistance ($837.97) : 

J. W. Copland. 3 weeks, 5% days 

F. A. Hare, 10 weeks, 2 days 

Mrs. F. L. Hunt, 12 weeks 

Miss K. T. Langridge, 10 weeks 

Mrs. F. P. Lloyd, 71 1/3 hours 

Miss J. C. Moore, 2 weeks, 4 days 

J. R. Okell. 2 weeks 

Postage 

University Press, printing Arts calendar, curricula, etc 

Less credits for record cards, stencils, etc 



$23 68 


24 00 


21 


20 


318 


24 


92 


00 


115 


16 


23 


90 


28 


05 


141 


75 


523 


77 


23 


90 


1 25 54 


70 


50 


206 67 


300 00 


150 00 


42 80 


32 00 


36 


00 


1.000 


00 


2.589 


13 


$5,788 29 


93 03 



$5,695 26 



190 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

6. Superintendent's Office 

Office supplies, printing, postage and incidentals ^$1,842.79) : 

Bernard Cairns Ltd., rubber stamps and repairs 

Grand & Toy. binder and cushion 

McMullin Publishers Ltd.. tariff service 

J. S. Morris, repairs to car 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. chairs, folders and transfer cases 

Photographic Service, blue-prints 

Postage 

Remington Rand Ltd., adding machine inspection 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection 

L^nderwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd., typewriter, $145.80, less allowance on 
old machine. S20 ; and carbon 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (20) 

Sundry disbursements: 

Telegrams, etc.. $15.11; car license. $12; sundries. $5.26 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $31.57; material. $134.15 

Incidental expenses re work on buildings: 

Labour 264 65 

Drafting assistance: 

R. R. Moffat. 25 weeks. 375y2 hours 1.016 35 

Clerical assistance ($694.17) : 

Miss R. E. Cannon. 15 weeks. 2 days 

Mrs. F. L. Hunt. 5 2/3 days 

Miss M. A. Lackie. 2 weeks 

Miss L. L. Reeve. 5 days 

Miss A. Salisbury-. 5% days 

Miss M. G. Sonley. 25 weeks. 1% days 



$21 


29 


17 


40 


25 00 


46 


55 


78 63 


11 


34 


264 00 


18 


25 


109 50 


127 


30 


843 


89 


81 


55 


32 


37 


165 


72 



Less credit for Customs entry fees 

7. Convocation Hall and Simcoe Hall 

Heat and light 

Gas. $61.84; water. $79.46 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 

Cleaning ($4,801.25): 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 

Melrose Window Cleaning Co 

Whirlwind Carpet Cleaning Co 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 

Repairs and renewals ($2,288.19) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son. awning 

M. F. Calway. cleaning cushions, etc 

Johnson Temperature Regulatinaf Co., repairs to control system 

Provincial Treasurer, public hall license 

Wm. Roberts & Son, curtains 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (4 ) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $1,646.51; material. $433.89 

Acting Postmaster and Chief Messenger. H. R. Cheney, 1 Aug. to 30 June 

(a $1,260, $1,155 — $24.29 1.130 71 

Messenger and Post Office service ($1,969.29) : 

Miss M. Bradshaw. Clerk. 12 mos. to 30 June. $884 — $17.68 866 32 

Messengers ffi $8 to $9.50 per week: 

C. Codner. 14% weeks 137 25 

H. Proctor. 2 davs 3 09 

J. Monkhouse. 52 weeks 494 00 

W. Sherman. 1 week, 5 days 15 58 

J. Wilson. 61/2 days 10 30 

R. Wilson. 45 weeks 403 75 

Carfares 39 00 

$14,530 16 
Less heat and light charged to Central Pov;er Plant. . . $3,682 62 

Credit for cleaning 174 10 

3.856 72 

$10,673 44 



245 00 


14 17 


30 00 


12 50 


13 75 


378 75 


$3,817 % 


42 25 


$3,775 71 


$3,682 62 


141 30 


516 80 


32 96 


42 50 


17 50 


4.708 29 


21 80 


20 75 


13 25 


10 00 


115 65 


10 89 


15 45 


2.080 40 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



191 



8. President's House 

Repairs and renewals: 

La France Fire Engine & Foamite Ltd., extinguishers. . . 
Superintendent's Dept., labour, S3. 90; material, $10.93. 



II. LIBRARY 

9. Salaries 

W. S. Wallace, Librarian (paid also $343 in Ontario College of Educa- 
tion) $5,400 — $185.50 

Miss H. G. B. Woolryche, Assistant Librarian, $2,300 — $54 

Miss A. H. Young, Reference Librarian, $2,000 — $45 

Heads of Departments: 

Miss M. L. Newton (Circulation — paid also $25 in Ontario College 

of Education Library School ) $2,100 — $48 

Miss H. Fairbairn (Periodical) $2,000 — $45 (retired 30 June) 

Miss E. V. Bethune ( Cataloguing ) $2,000 — $45 



$32 49 
14 83 


$47 32 




$231,230 99 



Assistants : 

Miss A. E. Stennett, $1,750 — $38.75 

Miss E. Creighton, $1,700 — $37.50 

Miss A. M. Cordingley (paid also $15 from University Press) 

$1,650 — $36.25 

Miss E. Aldridge, $1,600 — $35 

Miss J. Jarvis, $1,600 — $35 

Miss M. Skinner, $1,550 — $33.75 

Miss J. Rathbun, $1,500 — $32.50 

Miss D. Dignura, $1,400 — $30 

Miss I. Trowern, $1,400 — $30 

Miss A. Leonard, $1,400 — $30 

Miss M. L. Hewitt, $1,350 — $28.75 

Miss G. Williams, $1,300 — $27.50 

Miss V. A. Taylor, $1,300 — $27.50 

Miss K. Ball, $1,300 — $27.50 

Miss I. Hill, $1,300 — $27.50 

Miss D. Harding, $1,300 — $27.50 

Miss Doris Shiell, $1,300 — $27.50 

Miss M. Robinson, $1,250 — $26.25 

Miss D. Tod, $1,250 — $26.25 

Miss P. Eraser, $1,250 — $26.25 

Miss Edith Cook. $1,250 — $26.25 

Miss K. Wales, $1,250 — $26.25 

Miss E. Ashcroft, $1,250 — $26.25 

Miss Doris Pringle, $1,200 — $25 

Miss Sheila Tisdall, $1,200 — $25 

Miss H. C. Wrightman, $1,200 — $25 

Miss M. Buchan (part time) 

Assistants (incomplete year) : 
At $1,250 per annum: 

Miss H. Helliwell, 1 July to 8 October, $.339.38 — $9.13. . . 
Miss M. Wilkins, 1 July to 23 Sept. (paid also as Occasional 

Assistant $73.50) $288.20 — $6.05 

At $1,200 per annum: 

Miss Ruth Haldenby, 10 mos. from 1 Sept., (paid also $150 

as Occasional Assistant) $1,000 — $20.84 

Miss Margaret Hall, 24 Sept. to 30 June, $923.33 — $19.23. . 
Miss E. Bertram, 3% mos. from 15 March (paid also $385.14 

as Occasional Assistant ) $350 — $7.30 

Miss Joyce Lownsbrough, 8 Oct. to 15 March, 

$527.45 — $10.98 

Miss S. Ballard, 2 mos. to 31 August (paid also $1,222.92 

in Ontario College of Education) $200 — $4.16 

James A. Patterson, Attendant (with rooms, heat and light valued at 
$420 as Caretaker of building — paid also $197.50 for night work) 

$1,150 — $23.75 

Messengers (fi $9 to $9.50 per week: 

Stanley South, 26 weeks, 2 days (see also below) 

Wm. Glidden, 25 weeks, 5 days 

Arthur Taylor, Stackman 



$5,214 50 


2,246 


00 


1,955 00 


2,052 


00 


1,955 00 


1,955 


00 


1,711 


25 


1,662 


50 


1,613 


75 


1,565 00 


1.565 00 


1,516 


25 


1,467 


50 


1,370 00 


1,370 00 


1,370 00 


1,321 


25 


1,272 50 


1,272 


50 


1,272 


50 


1,272 


50 


1,272 50 


1,272 


50 


1,223 


75 


1,223 


75 


1,223 


75 


1,223 


75 


U23 


75 


1,223 


75 


1,175 


00 


1,175 


00 


1,175 00 


500 00 


332 


25 


282 


15 


979 


16 


904 


10 


342 


70 


516 47 


195 


84 



1.126 25 

250 17 
232 50 
720 00 



$56,794 09 



192 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



10. Library Maintenance 

General Library- Appropriation (Current Account): 
Books and periodicals I $34.037.79 1 : 

Edw. G. Allen & Son 

Thos. Allen 

American Chemical Society 

American Dental Association 

American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers. 

American Journal of Physiolog> 

American Library Association 

American Medical Association 

American Society for Testing Materials 

D. Appleton Century Co 

Baird & Tatlock Co 

Baker & Taylor Co 

Bibliographical Society of America 

B. H. Blackwell Co 

Albert Bonnier Publishing Co 

R. R. Bowker 

Braus-Rigsenbach 

E. J. BrilfLtd 

F. A. Brockhaus 

Burroughs & Co 

Butterworth & Co , 

Cambridge University Press 

Canada Law Book Co , 

Carswell Co 

Brig.-General G. S. Cartwright 

B. E. Case 

Honore Champion 

Citizens" Research Institute of Canada , 

Clarke Lniversity Press 

Cortauld Institute of Art 

Creasser's Book and Paint Shop 

\^ m. Dawson Subscription Service 

J. M. Dent & Sons 

Dental Items of Interest Publishing Co 

G. Ducharme 

Economic Geology 

Engineering Index. Inc 

Chas. Evans 

F. W. Faxon Co 

Henry Geo. Fiedler 

Gustav Fock 

Gaulon & Fils 

Gauthier-Villars et Cie 

Paul Geuthner 

Goodspeed Book Shop 

Walter de Gruyter & Co 

Gurn,pj' & Jackson 

Otto Harrassowitz 

Wm. Helburn. Inc 

Hirs<"hwaldsche Buchhandlung 

H. M. Stationer*' Office 

John Hopkins Press 

International Labor Office 

Journal of Biology & Chemistry- 

Otto Lange 

Librairi Honor Champion 

Librarv Association 

Libreria de Melchor Garcia 

J. B. Lippincott & Co 

Longmans. Green & Co 

McAinsh & Co 

M. MacDrmald 

McGraw Hill Book Co 

Geo. J. McLeod Ltd 

MacMillan Co. of Canada 

Modern Lanauage Association of America 

Gabriel Molina 



,037 38 
84 01 
27 59 

75 93 
113 03 

27 18 
122 00 
86 93 
48 54 
104 49 
285 59 
.670 04 

32 44 
137 25 
191 33 

84 28 

159 67 
48 33 

.910 68 
251 50 

57 95 
129 88 
104 00 
125 30 

25 00 

76 53 
.194 21 

25 00 
36 63 

178 34 
51 50 

203 46 

33 41 
70 69 

117 15 
48 97 

100 69 
25 34 

588 22 
54 41 

213 21 

104 48 

160 58 
98 47 
29 54 
84 63 
32 38 

143 32 

35 61 

207 11 

50 03 

64 62 

50 28 

40 55 

976 39 

129 93 

25 95 

29 37 

32 07 

146 88 

117 33 

100 00 

377 46 

58 25 
909 79 

34 33 

105 79 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



193 



Miss Blanche Murphv 33 00 

Musson Book Co 89 26 

Thos. Neliion & Sons Ltd 194 81 

New York Times Index 274 89 

N. V. Martinus Nijhoff's Boekhandel 412 34 

A. Nizet & M. Bastard 87 87 

Oxford University Press 440 72 

Park Book Shop. Washington 37 61 

Pierpont Morgan Library 76 17 

Psychological Review Co 30 79 

Garcia Rico y Cie 73 39 

Ryerson Press 1 69 52 

S. J. R. Saunders 136 98 

Chas. Scribner's Sons 25 36 

Rev. W. G. Shellabear 94 86 

Simpkin. Marshall Ltd 1,428 91 

Smithsonian Institution 95 62 

G. E. Stechert & Co 129 85 

Victoriana Suarez 308 21 

N. V. Swetz & Zeitlinger 351 50 

Chas. C. Thomas 44 72 

Mrs. Ida Thompson 27 50 

Trustees. British Museum 27 93 

University Association of Canada Ltd 74 25 

University of Chicago Press 70 29 

Friedr Vieweg & Sohn 70 17 

John Wilev & Son 178 13 

Willipms & Wilkins Co , 130 68 

H. W. Wilson Co 176 85 

Wistar Institute of Anatomy & Biology 118 39 

University Press 944 72 

Accounts under $25 (396) 2.579 28 

General Expenses ($10,206,061: 

Library- of Congress, cards 42 69 

Lowe-Martin Co.. book pockets and cards 383 52 

Office Specialty Mfs. Co.. cabinets, files, truck, etc 179 60 

Postage \ 645 00 

Robbins & Townsend. ivpewr.'ter rebuilt, and inspection ^55 00 

L. C. Smith & Corona Typewriters Ltd.. typewriter 152 25 

Superintendent of Documents, Washington, advance for pam- 
phlets, etc 100 86 

Toronto Type Foundry- Co.. punching machine 48 00 

A. F. Webster & Sons. American stamps 101 00 

Universitv Press, binding, printing and stationery 7.648 35 

Accoi-nls' under $25 ( 17 1 125 39 

Superintendent"? Dept.. freisht. S353.56; labour. $115.64; 

material. $155.20 624 40 

$44,243 85 
Less sales tax refunded. $200.03; replacement of books lost by 

by departments, etc.. $225.67 425 70 

$43,818 15 

Of which charged to sundry funds as follows: 

Carnegie Library-. Universitv College $464 67 

DentaL Harrv R. Abbott 645 88 

John Squair Fund No. 2 1 19 52 

K ne Alfred Millenary 468 80 

Phillips Stewart Bequest 70 79 

Psychology Fund 334 57 

2.104 23 



Transactions by Librarian: 

Balance in his hands. 1 July. 1935. $8.81 ; credited 
from fines. $709.50: replacement of books lost. 

S92.45; graduates" depf>sits. $1.150 

Deposits refunded. $593.57: left in Librarian's 
hands to be accounted for. $73.66 



$41,713 92 



$1,960 76 
667 23 



$U93 53 



194 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Transferred to Trust Funds (Schedule 3) bcdance 
of graduates' deposits 

Credited to this account 



556 43 



Assistance: 

At $80 per month: 

Miss F. English, 12 mos., $%0 — $19.20 

Miss K. Fisher, 12 mos.. $960 — $19.20 

Miss Jean Warnica. 9 mos., 21 days, $776 — $15.52. 
At $70 to $80 per month: 

Miss M. Thomson, 8 mos., 51 days 

Miss J. MacBeth, 6 mos., 103 days 

Miss W. Bennett, 6 mos., 71 days 

Miss E. Killam, 5 mos., % days 

Miss G. Gedeonoff, 5 mos., 74 days 

Miss E. Bertram, 3 mos., 66 days 

Miss E. Heighington, 1 month, 74 days 

Miss C. Fish, 3 mos 

Miss R. Haldenby, 2 mos 

Miss M. Brown, 53 days 

Miss J. Lownsbrough, 45 days 

At $50 to $65 per month: 

Miss E. Fleury, 12 mos 

Miss J. Knowlton, 8 mos., 8 days 

Stanley South, 6 mos., V2 day 

Miss M. Dunlop, 3 mos 

Miss P. Birchall, 1 month, 37 days 

Part time at $25 per month: 

Miss M. Clarkson, 9 mos., 7 days 

At 50c to 75c per hour: 

Mrs. M. Gibbons, 98 hours 

Miss S. Bell, 108 hours 

Miss E. Wilson, 76 hours 

Miss M. Ross, 48 hours 

At 25c per hour: 

D. Shearer, 298 hours 

W. Prest. 208 hours 

D. C. Masters, 64 hours 

G. Sutton, 44 hours 



737 10 



$40,976 82 


$940 80 


940 80 


760 48 


723 84 


701 83 


622 24 


609 49 


517 51 


385 14 


236 43 


225 00 


150 00 


130 65 


109 35 


780 00 


463 33 


301 00 


150 00 


110 21 


230 65 


73 50 


54 00 


38 00 


28 50 


74 50 


52 00 


16 00 


11 00 



Less credits. 



1,436 25 
624 41 



$8,811.84 charged as follows: 
Occasional asssistance, including opening Library in evenings. 

Special grant for re-classification 

Alterations and fixtures ($200) : 

Grand & Toy Ltd., steel shelving 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $109.25; material, $70.50 



$20 25 
179 75 



11. Library Building 

Heat and light '. $3,200 04 

Gas, $57.36 ; water, $96.89 154 25 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 349 47 

Cleaning ($2,103.50) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 18 96 

C. Waterhouse, window cleaning 44 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 2,040 54 

Repairs and renewals ($2,141.63) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son. shades 18 06 

City Treasurer, elevator license 5 00 

T. Eaton Co., linoleum, etc 40 50 

Johnson Temperature & Regulating System, heating s>stem repairs.. 29 04 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 25 85 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1,600.92; material. $422.26 2.023 18 

Caretaker, with living quarters valued (a $420 (paid from salaries as 

Library Attendant ) 



6,169 76 
2,642 08 



200 00 



$49,988 66 



$7,948 89 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 195 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant $3,200 04 

Sundry credits 10 10 

3.210 14 

$4,738 75 



$111,521 50 



III. 12. ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 

University's share of maintenance advanced to the Trustees of the Royal Ontario 

Museum under R.S.O. 1927. Cap. 343 $67,480 80 



IV. ATHLETICS, PHYSICAL TRAINING. MILITARY STUDIES, ETC. 

13. Athletics and Physical Training — Men 
(a) Salaries: 

T. A. Reed, Secretary-. Athletic Directorate. $5,500 — $180 $5,320 00 

D. M. Baeton. Gymnasium Director (ob. 3 Nov.. salary to 31 Jan. 

paid to widow ) $1,600 — $41.50 1.558 50 

W. H. "Martin. Gymnasium Instructor. 10 mos.. $2.500— $60; 
honorarium as Acting Head of Gymnasium staff upon death of 

D. M. Barton. $200 2,640 00 

W. W. V interburn. Swimming Instructor, 10 mos., $2,600 — $63 .. . 2,537 00 

Part-time Instructors (Sess'onall: 

J. E. McCutcheon, 10 mos.. $2,400 — $57 2.343 00 

C. Zw vgard, 5 mos 750 00 

H. Phillips 400 00 

L. W. Black { honorarium ) 200 00 

F. Brown ( honorarium ) 200 00 

C. Chilcott ( honorarium » 200 00 

J. H. W. Bradfield (honorarium) 75 00 

Locker Attendants: 

W. Rimmer. Chief Locker and Attendance Clerk. $2,000 — $45 1.955 00 

L. Parkin. SV^ mos 850 00 

C. Carruthers. IVj mos 487 50 

M. Long, 30 weeks @ $15 450 00 

D. W. Robertson, 29 weeks, 5 days Co $15 447 50 

Mrs. B. A. L'Aventure. Clerical Assistant. 10 mos 750 00 

121.163 50 
Less Secretary's salary chaiged to Athletic Association 5.320 00 

b) Maintenance of Department: 

-Attendance records, card system ($110.56) : 

Premier Reconditioned Office Furniture Equipment Co.. desks 

and chairs. $65; less allowance on old furniture. $10 

L'niversity of Toronto Athletic Association, postage supplied... 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Gymnastic appliances and repairs to equipment ($6451 : 

John Adair, repairing mats 

American Tent & Awning Co.. punch bags and mat covers 

Associated Chemical Co.. foot bath 

T. Eaton Co.. foil blades, guards, etc 

Chas. E. M'cElroy. take-off boards for swimming pool, hurdle 

boards repaired and recovered 

Toronto Radio & Sports Co., boxing gloves, basket balls and 

repairs 

John T. Walters, repairs to balls 

Harold A. Wilson, balls, foil blades, coats, nets and repairs to 

apparatus, etc 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $100.37; material. $25.28 



$15,843 50 



$55 00 

8 85 

46 71 




16 00 
10 60 
24 55 
42 31 




55 70 




111 43 
6 00 




252 76 
125 65 


755 56 




$16,599 06 



< 



- '196 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



14. Athletics aad Physical Training — Women 

(a) Salaries: 

Miss I. G. Coventry. Physical Director, $2,000 — $45 $1.9.5.5 00 

Miss J. M. Forster. Assistant Physical Director. 8 mos.. 

$1,300 — $27.50 1.272 50 

Instructors m Swimming: 

A. L. Cochrane, 7 mos.. $1,200 — $25 1.175 00 

Miss A. Cochrane, Assistant, 7 mos .300 00 

Mrs. Margaret Graham. Qerical and Gymnasium Assistant, 8 mos. 
f^paid also $214.50 as Pianist and $137 in Ontario College of 
Education ) 300 00 

Miss A. E. M. Parkes. Sacretary-<Trea?urer, Women's Athletic 
Directorate (Sessional — paid also by Students' Administrative 
Council ) $350 — S8.20 341 80 

(b) Maintenance of Department: 
Sundry expenses ($351.39) : 

Miss I. G. Coventry, piano rental and postage $43 70 

Mrs. Margaret Graham, pianist, 214% hours 214 50 

Madsen's Gymnastic Institute, balance beams and bench 25 (X) 

Harold A. Wilson, basket balls, foil tips and shuttles 22 43 

University Press, printing and stationery 24 03 

Accounts under $10 ( 2 » 9 60 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $6.91 ; material, $5.22 12 13 

Janitor service at night classes. A. J. Maycock 74 75 

(c) Course for Diploma in Physical Education: 

Honoraria lo Instructors (see also Department of Anatomy) $300: 

Dr. H. D. Ball. Anatomy $150 00 

Miss K. I. McMurrich. Anatomy and Kinesiology 150 00 



$5,344 30 



426 14 



300 00 



$6,070 44 



15. Health Service — Men 

(a) Salaries: 

G. D. Porter. EHrector (paid also $483.30 in Hygiene) 

$5,250 — $175.80 $5,074 20 

John M. Thomas. Office Assistant. 8 mos 800 00 

(b) Maintenance of Department: 
Examining Physicians, etc. ($l,170j : 

R. G. Armour $10 00 

Noble Black 100 00 

A. H. W. Caulfeild 10 00 

T. A. Crowther 100 00 

C. B. Farrar 100 00 

Frank Hassard 100 00 

Ross Jamieson 20 00 

A. G. McPhedran 200 00 

S. J. Magwood 100 00 

John Oille 20 00 

Frank Park 100 00 

D. E. Robertson 10 00 

W. E. L. Sparks 100 00 

Addison Taylor 100 00 

Wright Young 100 00 

Surgical Assistance and Equipment: 

University of Toronto Athletic Association, University's share of 

medical services 600 00 

Medical and office supplies and printing, including X-Ray examina- 
tions ($199.04) : 

J. F. Hartz Co.. medical supplies 82 42 

Toronto Western Hospital, X-Rays 90 00 

University Press, printing and stationery 12 37 

Accounts under $10 ( 2 ) 14 25 



$5,874 20 



1,%9 04 



$7,843 24 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 197 

16. Health Services — Women 
(a) Salaries: 

Dr. Edith H. Gordon, Medical Adviser, $3,400 — $91 $3,309 00 

Miss M. Jackes, Office Assistant, 8 mos., $1,100 — $22.50 1.077 50 



(b) Maintenance of Department: 

Expenses of Medical Office and examining room, including con- 
sultants, X-Ray, etc.: 

Allen M'fg. Co., laundry 

Continental Rug Co., rug 

T. Eaton Co., book case, chair, table, etc 

Ingram & Bell, medical supplies 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., settee 

Western Reserve University, anthropometer 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (3) 

Sundr)' disbursements by department 

Superintendent's Dept., freight 



$14 90 


17 95 


42 71 


36 57 


34 39 


31 56 


32 62 


5 05 


13 94 


90 



17. Military Studies 
(a) Salaries: 

Brig.-General G. S. Cartwright, Director, $2,500 — $60 $2,440 00 

W. A. Baughurst, Assistant. 10 mos., $980 — $19.60 %0 40 



(b) Maintenance of Department: 
Office £ind general expenses: 

Geo. M. Hendry Co., maps $16 71 

University Press, printing and stationery 16 72 

Accounts under $10 (5) 19 66 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $4.30; material, $1.45 5 75 



18. Hart House — Share of Maintenance 

Heat and light $18,404 32 

Cleaning, etc., of Gymnasium Wing: 

Comptroller, Hart House 4,000 00 

Repairs and renewals ($4,953.18) : 

City Treasurer, elevator licenses 15 00 

John Inglis Co., hot water storage tank, etc 337 60 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co., repairs to floor 46 25 

John Lindsay, repairs to tile 11 42 

Geo. Oakley & Son, repairs to sun dial and pedestal 10 00 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 57 30 

Accounts under $10 (2) 7 50 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $3,222.80; material. $1.245.31 4,468 11 

$27,357 50 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant 18.404 32 



19. Women's Building — 44 Hoskin Avenue 
Maintenance: 

Fuel ($271.74) : 

Central Coal Co 

Elias Rogers Coal Co 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 

Gas, $11.28; electric current, $56.36; water, $8 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 

Cleaning and furnace man ($355.36) : 

Accounts under $10 (2) 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 

Repairs and renewals ($78.52) : 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $51.18; material, $7.34 



$69 68 

196 25 

5 81 

75 64 


22 71 


9 67 
345 69 


20 00 
58 52 



$4,386 50 



230 59 



$4,617 09 



$3,400 40 



58 84 



i.459 24 



?.953 18 



$803 97 



198 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

20. Military Studies Building 
Maintenance: 

Light 151 26 

Fuel: 

Central Coal Co 316 41 

Gas. f 15.28; water. $14.98 30 26 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 40 64 

Cleaning (§303 I : 

Canadian Cleaning Co.. window cleaning 3 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 300 00 

Repairs and renewals: 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $469.64; material. $161.11 630 75 



$1,372 32 
Less light charged to Central Power Plant 51 26 



V. FACULTY OF ARTS 

21. Salaries 
(1) Departments in University of Toronto ($557,865.90) 

Dean's Office 

F B. Allan. Dean, ^a $1,000 (ob. 9 Jan.— see also Chemistry) 
$500- $24 S476 00 

G. S. Brett. Acting Dean, honorarium for services after death of Dean 

Allan ( see also Philosophy ) 500 00 

Mathematics 

S. Beattv (paid also $560 for Extension Work) $5,500 — 8180 $5,320 00 

M. A. >iackenzie. $5,500 — S180 ( retired 30 June ) 5.320 00 

L R. Pounder (paid also S420 for Extension Work) $4,500 — $135. . 4.365 00 

Associate Professors: 

W. L Webber. $4,000 — $115 3,885 00 

N. E. Sheppard. $3,800 — $107 3.693 00 

Assistant Professors: 

D. A. F. Robinson. S3.350 — $89 3.261 00 

T. D. Burk (paid also $366 for Extension Work) $2,600 — $63 2.537 00 

G. deB. Robinson. $2,600 — $63 2.537 00 

Richard Brauer. $2,600 — $63 2.537 00 

Lecturers (Sessional I : 

Miss C. Krieger (paid also $322 for Extension Work) $2.0.50— $46.50 2.003 50 

Miss M. E. G. Waddell. $1,950 — $43.75 1,906 25 

Fellows (Sessional) : 

D. C. Baillie 700 00 

D. B. DeLurx' 700 00 

J. M. Kingston 700 00 

Carson Mark 700 00 

D. C. Murdoch 700 00 

C. J. Nesbitt 700 00 

H. C. Unruh 700 00 



Applied Mathematics 

J. L. Synge. Professor (paid also $25 from University Press) 

$6,000 — $205 $5,795 00 

A. F. C. Stevenson, Associate Professor. $3,450 — 93 3,357 00 

B. A. Griffith, Lecturer (Sessional) $1,950 — $43.75 1,906 25 

G. E. Hay. Fellow (Sessional) 700 00 



$1,321 06 
$49,667 28 



$976 00 



$42,264 75 



$11,758 25 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 199 

Physics 
Professors : 

E. F. Burton, also Director of Laboratory, $5,500 — $180 $5,320 00 

J. Satterly, $5,000 — $155 4,845 00 

L. Gilchrist (paid also $280 for Extension Work) $4,200 — $123. . . . 4,077 00 

H. A. McTaggart. Associate Professor, $4^0 — $123 4,077 00 

Assistant Professors: 

D. S. Ainslie (paid also .$420 for Extension \^. crk) $3,100 — $79. . . . 3,021 00 

H. J. C. Ireton. $2,950 — $73.50 2,876 50 

H. Grayson Smith. $2,900 — $72 2,828 00 

C. Barnes. $2,600 — $63 2.537 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

J. O. Vt ilhelm. $2,800 — $69 2.731 00 

M. F. Crawford. $2,400 — $57 2.343 00 

Lecturers and Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

A. Pitt. $2,250 — $52.50 2.197 50 

Miss E. J. Allin. $2,000 — $45 1.955 00 

Miss K. M. Crossley. $1,500 — $32.50 1,467 50 

Miss F. M. Quinlan. $1,400 — $30 1.370 00 

J. K. L. MacDonald, $1,200 — $25 1,175 00 

Special Lecturers (Sessional) : 

A. B. -McUy 300 00 

W. H. Kohl 200 00 

W. E. Jackson "j 

W. E. K. Middleton . . I without salary 

John Patterson I 

Andrew Thomson . . . / 

Bernhard Haurwitz, Carnegie Fellow, 9 mos. from 1 Oct. (paid $1,800 

from Special Fund ) 

R. Richmond. Demonstrator (Sessional ) 800 00 

Assistant Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

S. M. Bateson (paid also $30 as Technical Assistant) 

A, H. Woodcock 

H. L. Welsh 

G. F. Clark 

F. J. P. Consitt (resigned 15 Feb.) 

Stuart M. Dockerty 

D. W. R. McKinley 

L. Newman 

H. desB. Sims 

A. I. Cove , 

J. R. Levitt , 

A. F. Chisholm. Special Demonstrator (Sessional — without salary)..., 
Class Assistants: 

K. C. Mann 

G. W. C. Tait 

F. A. 0. Banks 

Miss A. T. Reed, Secretary and Class Assistant, $2,000 — $45 

Miss B. M. Savage. Clerical Assistant. $1,500 — $32.50 

T. S. Plaskett. Mechanician. S2.600 — $63 (retired 30 June) 

Assistant Mechanicians: 

B. Clark. S1.800 — $40 

J. Anderson. $1,800 — $40 

J. Ward, $1,800 — $40 

G. T. Woodward, $1,800 — $40 

R. H. Chappell. Glass-blower. $2,600 — $63 

P. Blackman. Laboratory- and Lecture Assistant. $1,600 — $35 

Astronomy 
R. K. Young. Professor, also Director of David Dunlap Observatory 

$4,500 — $135 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

F. S. Hogg. $2,550 — $61.50 

P. M. Millman (paid also $200 for Extension Work) $1,750 — $.38.75 
J. F. Heard. Demonstrator (Sessional — paid also $2(X) for Extension 

Work) $1,500 — $32.50 

Miss F. S. Patterson. .Assistant (Sessional ) 

Miss R. Northcott. Computer. $1,000 — $20 

Miss E. M. Fuller. Secretary-Librarian. $1,000 -- $20 

Gerald F. Longworth. Night Observer, 9 mos., 22 days 

Wm. MacDonald, .Mechanician, 3 mos. (iV 1110. $330 — $6.73 



800 00 
800 00 
700 00 
500 00 


281 25 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 
500 00 


450 00 


450 00 


100 00 


72 00 


45 00 


1.955 00 


1.467 50 


2,537 00 


1.760 00 


1.760 00 


1.760 00 


1.760 00 


2.537 00 


1,565 00 


«67 i-^n '"i 




$4,365 00 


2,488 50 


i 1.711 25 


1.467 50 


500 00 


980 00 


980 00 


973 34 


323 27 


$13,788 86 



200 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Geology 
Professors : 

W. A. Parks (on leave of absence) S6.000 — $205 (resigned 30 June) 

E. S. Moore. Economic Geology (paid also 1100 for Summer Field 
Work and $1 from University Press) $5,200 — $165 

A. MaoLean (paid also $280 for Extension Work) ^,200 — $123.. 
Dr. Madeleine A. Fritz. Lecturer I part time — Sessional ; paid also in 

Royal Ontario Museum) $750 — $15 

Instructors (Sessional) : 

J. Satterlv. $1,500 — $32.50 

J. C. Sproule, $1,500 — $32.50 

Qass Assistants (Sessional) : 

J. E. Armstrong 

G. R. Berquist (resigned 28 Feb.) 

O. F. Carter 

H. C. Lane 

W". W. Moorehouse 

Bruce Russell 

H. G. Way 

Douglas Monteith. Laboratory Attendant (paid also $80 for Extension 
Work) 9 mos 



$5,795 00 


5,035 00 
4,077 00 


735 00 


1,467 50 
1,467 50 


250 00 
156 25 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 


675 00 

$20,908 25 



MincTalogy 

Professors : 

T. L. Walker, also Director of Laboratory, $6,000 — $205 $5,795 00 

\ L Parsons (paid also $140 for Extension Work) $4,500 — $135. . 4,365 00 

Ellis Thomson. $4,000 — $115 3.885 00 

Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

A. S. Dadson 400 00 

V. B. Meen -WO 00 

J. M. Baker. Assistant (Sessional) 400 00 

Wm. Wightman. Laboratory' Attendant, 8 mos. (paid also $40 for 

Extension Work) 800 00 



Chemistry 

Professors: 

W. Lash Miller. Physical Chemistry. $6,500 — $305 $6,195 00 

F. B. Allan. Organic Chemistry (ob. 9 Jan. — remainder of salary 
to 30 June paid to widow; paid also $476 as Dean of Faculty) 

$5,500 — $218.50 5,281 50 

F. B. Kenrick (paid also $260 for Extension Work) $5,500 — $180 5,320 00 

Associate Professors: 

J. B. Ferguson. $4,400 — $131 4.269 00 

J. T. Burt-Gerrans. Electro-Chemi&try (paid also $10 for Extension 

Work) S4.350 — $129 4,221 00 

L. J. Rogers. $4,350 — $129 4,221 00 

W. S. Funnell. $3,950 — $113 3,837 00 

W. H. Martin. $3.950 — $113 3,837 00 

A. R. Gordon. $3,300 — $87 3,213 00 

F. R. Lorriman. $3,300 — $87 3,213 00 

F. E. Beamish. Assistant Professor. $2,500 — $60 2,440 00 

Dr. Helen Stantial. Lecturer, Micro- Analysis. $2,500 — $60 2.440 00 

Assistants (Sessional) : 

Miss E. V. Eastcott. $1,800 — $40 1,760 00 

C. Marchant 740 00 

L. H. Cragg 724 00 

A. A. Janis 724 00 

L. F.King 724 00 

J. R. Patton (resigned 20 May) 694 00 

R. G. Romans 724 00 

Miss M. Scott 724 00 

Cornelius Unruh 724 00 

W. F. Weston (resigned 31 Mar.) 543 00 

M. M. Bayne 650 00 

H. J. Bernstein 650 00 

D. J. LeRoy 650 00 

\. J. W. McHattie (resigned 31 Oct.) 81 25 

R. N. Meals 650 00 

J. J. Russell 650 00 



$16,045 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 201 

F. J. Webb 650 00 

I. D. Wintrob 650 00 

M. Cohen 624 00 

G. C. Allen (resigned 31 Mar.) 428 57 

Miss M. L. Elder (paid also $490 from Special Fund) 320 00 

Miss C. J. Sanderson (paid also $490 from Special Fund) 320 00 

M. Wayman 80 00 

H. L. Collins 35 00 

Demonstrators, EUectro-Chemistry (Sessional) : 

A. H. Heatley, $2,000 — $45 1,955 00 

F. E. W. Wetmore, $824 — $16.40 807 60 

R. S. Soanes 750 00 

Laboratory .\ssistants : 

R. Fortescue (with rooms, heat and light valued (a $420 as care- 
taker of building) $1,150 — $23.75 1.126 25 

W. Banton, $1,400; Lecture Assistant. $200; $1,600 — $35 1.565 00 

Laboratory Attendants ((J $11 to $13 per week: 

H. Renwlck. 52 weeks, 2 days 680 33 

C. Howes, 41 weeks, 2 days 454 66 

A. Kaellgren. 41 weeks, 2 days 454 66 

F. H. Twigg, 153 hours @ 42c 64 26 



$70,865 08 



Biology 
Professors : 

E. M. Walker, Invertebrate Zoology, $5,500 — $180 $5,320 00 

W. H. Piersol, Histology and Embryology. @ $5,100, of which half 
charged to Anatomy $2,550 — $80 

Laurence Irving, Experimental Biology, $4,500 — $135 

A. G. Huntsman. Marine Biology ( without salary) 

Associate Professors: 

A. F. Coventry. Vertebrate Embrvology. $3,950 — $113 

J. R. DvTnond. Systematic Zoology. $3,950 — $113 

W. H. t. Baillie. Mammalian Anatomv, $3,950 — $113 

J. W. MacArthur. Genetics. $3,950 — $113 

E. H. Craigie. Comparative Anatomy and Neurology. $3,600 — $99.. 
Assistant Professors: 

W. J. K. Harkness, Limnobiology, $3,450 — $93 

Dr. Norma H. C. Ford. $3,000 — $75 

F. P. Ide. Lecturer (Sessional — paid also $580 for Extension Work) 

$1,800 — $40 

Demonstrators (Sessional): 

C. E. Atwood. $900 — $18 

K. C. Fisher. $900 — $18 

Miss J. A. Eraser, $900 — $18 

F. E. J. Fry (paid also $220.50 in Special Research) $900 — $18.60 
Assistants ( Sessional ) : 

E. C. Black 

Miss V. E. Engelbert 

Miss .1. F. Hart 

G. Whiteley 

J. V. McCutcheon 

H. M. Rogers 

G. F. M. Smith 

Dr. Kathleen M. Bartley 

C. C. Brown 

E. A. Cummings 

J. P. Fleming 

C. I. Junkin 

Miss M. F. Jarvis 

N. W. Radforth (paid also $150 in Special Research, Botany) 

Miss Grace Workman 

J. M. Speirs 

W. R. \^Tiittaker '..'..'. 

K. H. Doan (paid also $60 in Special Research) 

Miss T. V. Green 

Miss L. F. Harkness 

Miss I. Limbert 

R. B. Miller '...'.'.'.'.'. 

Miss M. S. Milne 

Miss D. E. Bobbins 



2,470 00 


4.365 


00 


3.837 00 


3,837 00 


3.837 


00 


3.837 


00 


3.501 


00 


3.357 


00 


2,925 


00 


1.760 


00 


882 


00 


882 


00 


882 


00 


881 


40 


400 00 


400 


00 


400 


00 


400 


00 


300 


00 


300 


00 


300 00 


200 00 


150 00 


150 


00 


150 00 


150 00 


90 


00 


80 00 


75 


00 


45 00 


45 00 


40 00 


35 00 


35 


00 


35 


00 


35 00 


35 00 



202 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Miss S. Taylor (paid also $30 in Special Research, Botany) 

E. S. Pentland 



Miss K. M. Robertson ... 1 

Miss R. D. C. Martin .... .- . .without «alar)' 

J. Stevenson I 

Technical Assistants: 

C. D. Barker. 9 mos.. $900— $18 

Thos. Stovell. 12 mos 

Miss A. H. Bell. 9 mos 

Miss M. Sewell. 9 mos 

E. C. Cross. Museum Assistant. $1,650 — $36.25 

W. J. LeRay. Curator of Vivarium. $1,650 — $36.25 

A. Wilson. Laboratory Assistant. $900 — $18 

Wm. Smith. Laboratory Attendant 

Secretarial Assistant (fi $1,350: 

Miss D. Tarr (resigned 29 Feb.) $900 — $19.16 

Miss H. McCaul. from 1 March (see also below) $450 — $9.59. 

Sliss Phyllis Foreman. 9 mos.. $810 — $9.90 

Stenographer and Librarian: 

Miss H. McCaul. 8 mos. to 28 Feb.. $733.34 — $15 ^. . . . 

Miss Mildred Godard, 4 mos. from 1 March. $366.67 — $7.50... 



35 00 


20 


00 


882 


00 


800 


00 


650 00 


360 00 


1.613 


75 


1.613 


75 


882 


00 


520 00 


880 


84 


440 


41 


800 


10 


718 


34 


359 


17 




— $57,033 76 



Botany 

Professors: 

R. B. Thomson. Plant Morphology. $5,500 — $180 $5,320 00 

H. S. Jackson. Mycology. $5,200 — $165 5.035 00 

Associate Professors: 

D. L. Bailev. Plant Pathology (2/3rds time) $3.000 — $75 2.925 00 

G. H. Duff. Plant Physiology, $3,950 — $113 3,837 00 

H. B. Sifton. Plant Morphology and OEcology, $3,950 — $113 3,837 00 

Assistant Professors : 

Dr. J. Gertrude Wright. $3,000 — $75 2,925 00 

T. M. C. Tavlor. $2,700 — $66 2.634 00 

E. C. Beck. Lecturer (Sessional! $1,950 — $43.75 1,906 25 

W. R. Haddow. Special Lecturer (Sessional — without salary) 

A. J. V. Lehmann. Senior Demonstrator (Sessional — paid also $288.40 

in Special Research I $1,285 — $32.75 1,252 25 

Qass Assistants: 

. K. W. Baldwin (paid also $170 in Special Research) 525 00 

M. W. Bannan (paid also $120 in Special Research) 525 00 

R. G. Cormack (paid also $170 in Special Research) 525 00 

Miss D. F. Forward (paid also $110 in Special Research) 525 00 

D. H. Hamly (paid also $343 in Applied Physics and $198.50 in 

Special Research) $525 — $13.60 511 40 

A. N. Langford (paid also $170 in Special Research and $40 in 

Biology) 525 00 

D. C. McPherson (paid also $170 in Special Research) 525 00 

D. F. Putnam 525 00 

Miss R. P. Biggs (paid also $170 in Special Research) 490 00 

Miss A. B. Brodie (paid also $110 in Special Research) 490 00 

L. O. Weaver (paid also $230 in Special Research) 490 00 

L. G. Herman 390 00 

S. T. B. Losee 390 00 

P. G. Newell 390 00 

J. W. Groves (paid also $450 as Technical Assistant — see below. 

and $205 in Special Research ) 75 00 

Technical Assistants: 

Miss M. B. Givens. $1,800 — $40 1.760 00 

Miss C. B. Ross. $1,400 — $30 1.370 00 

R. F. Cain. $1.350 — $28.75 1.321 25 

J. W. Groves 450 00 

A. Simpson. Horticulturist (with living quarters valued @ $360) 

$2,200 — $51 2.149 00 

L. Van Cleemput. Gardener. $1,450 — $31.25 1.418 75 

J. Van Beek. Assistant Gardener. $1,400 — $30 1.370 00 

Clerical Assistants: 

Miss L. Alward. $1,400 — $30 1.370 00 

Miss M. A. Forward. $1,400 — $30 1.370 00 

Dr. Kathleen L. Hull. Librarian. $1,200 — $25 1.175 00 

P. Krotkov, Herbarium Assistant, $1,800 — $40 1.760 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 203 

Laboratory Attendants: 

R. Lynn. $1,100 — S22.50 1,077 50 

S. G. Smith, $1,000 — $20 980 00 

G. M. Proudfoot. $900 — $18 882 00 



$55,026 40 



History 
Professors : 

Chester Martin (paid also $2 from University Press) $5,500 — $180 $5,320 00 
R. Flenley (paid also $50 for Extension Work and $4.25 from 

University Press ) $4,700 — $143 4,557 00 

F. H. Underhill ( paid also $22.75 from University Press) 

^,700 — $143 4,557 00 

G. W. Brown (paid also $520. .50 from University Press and $256 for 
Extension Work I $4,500 — $1 35 4.365 00 

Assistant Professors: 

G. deT. Glazebrook (paid also $342 for Extension Work and $1.25 

from University Press ) $3,250 — $85 3,165 00 

D. G. Creighton (paid also $528 for Extension Work and $2 from 

University Press) $2,700 — $66 2,634 00 

Edgar Mclnnis (paid also $918 for Extension Work and $35 from 

University Press) $2,600 — $63 2,537 00 

D. J. McDougall (paid also $498 for Extension Work and $1 from 

University Press) $2,600 — $63 2.537 00 

R. M. Saunders. Lecturer (Sessional — paid also $826 for Extension 

Work and $21.25 from University Press) $2,200 — .$51 2,149 00 

Miss E. Sims. Reader (Sessional — paid also $414 for Extension Work) 250 00 

Anthropology 

T. F. Mcllwraith. Associate Professor (paid also $15 from University 

Press) $4,200 — $123 $4,077 00 

C. W. M. Hart, Lecturer (Sessional), also Supervisor of Studies for 

Course in Sociology (paid also $100 for Extension Work) $2,300 — $54 2,246 00 

Archaeology 

C. T. Currellv. Professor (part time — paid also in Roval Ontario 

Museum) .$4,500 — $135 '. $4,365 00 

Rt. Rev. . C. White. Associate Professor, Archaeology (Chinese — paid 

also in Royal Ontario Museum ) $2,500 — $60 2.440 00 

Homer A. Thompson. Assistant Professor. Classical Archaeology (half 

time) $1,700 — $37.50 1.662 50 

Fine Art 

John Alford, Professor (paid $5,(X)0 from Special Fund, also $200 for 

Extension Work) 

F. S. Haines, Lecturer ( Sessional — without salary ) 

Geography 

Griffith Taylor, Professor, $4,000 — $245 (paid also $2,440 in Ontario 

College of Education and $17.50 from University Press) $3,755 00 

Political Economy 
Professors : 

E. J. Urwick, Economics (paid also $2 from University Press) 

$5,500 — $180 $5,320 00 

W. T. Jackman. Transportation, $4,900 — $151 4,749 00 

Associate Professors: 

H. A. Innis (paid also $36 from Universitv Press) $4,000 — $115. . 3 885 00 

H. R. Kemp, $3,900 — $111 3.789 00 

V. W. Bladen, also Supervisor of Studies in Political Economy (paid 

also $400 from University Press) $3,850 — $109 3.741 00 

A. Brady (paid also $210 for Extension Work and $175 from 

University Press) $3,600 — $99 3.501 00 



$32,071 00 



$6,323 00 



$8,467 50 



$3,755 00 



204 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Assistant Professors: 

Lome T. Morgan (paid also $820 for Extension Work) $3,450 — $93 3,357 00 
W. M. Drummond (paid also $366 for Extension Work and $17 from 

University Press) $3,000 — $75 

J. F. Parkinson (paid also $460 for Extension Work) $2,500 — $60 
Miss I. M. Biss ( paid also $2 from University Press) $2,500 — $60 
Lecturers (Sessional): 

J. G. Perold (paid also $400 for Extension Work) $2,550 — $61.50 
A. F. W. Plumptre (paid also $15.25 from University Press) 

$2,400 — $57 

Donald C MacGregor (paid also $27 from University Press) 

$2,400 — $57 

V. F. Coe (paid also $11 from University Press) $2,150 — $49.50. . 
G. E. Britnell (paid also $20 for Extension Work and $19 from 

University Press) $2,000 — $45 

C. B. Macpherson, $1,800— $40 

H. D. Woods. Assistant ( Sessional ) 

A, J. Glazebrook. Special Lecturer, Banking and Finance (Sessional — 

paid $2,500 from Special Fund ) 

Law: 

Professors : 

W. P. M. Kennedy, Constitutional Law (paid also $210 from 

University Press) $5,400 — $175 

N. A. M. MacKenzie. Public and Private International Law 
(paid also $2 from University Press) $4,000 — $115 

F. C. Auld, Associate Professor of Roman Law and Jurisprudence, 
and Special Lecturer, Commercial Law (paid also $200 for 
Extension Work) $4.000 — $115 

Jacob Finkelman. Assistant Professor, Administrative and Industrial 
Law ( paid also $30 for Extension Work) , $2,300 — $54 

E. Russell Hopkins. Lecturer (Sessional) $1,500 — $32.50 

Kenneth G. Gray. Honorary Lecturer (Sessional — without salary) .. 

Accounting: 

W. S. Ferguson. Professor (part time — paid also $20 for Extension 

Work) $2,550 — $61.50 

Assistant Professors: 

F. R. Crocombe (paid also $80 for Extension Work) $3.450— $93 

C. A. Ashley. $3.150 — $87; Supervisor of Studies in Commerce 

and Finance. $600 — $18 

Philosophy 
Professors: 

G. S. Brett (it $6,000. of which $1,000 paid in Ethics (paid also 
$941.50 as Dean of Graduate Studies; $500 as Acting Dean of 
Arts, and $30 in Ontario College of Education) $5,000 — $288 .. . $4,712 00 

F. H. Anderson (paid also $212 for Extension Work and $25 from 
University Press ) $4,600 — $139 4,461 00 

Associate Professors: 

H. R. MacCallum (paid also $150 for Extension Work) $4,200— $123 4,077 00 

E. W. Macdonald. $3,300 — $87 3,213 00 

W. Jarvis MdCurdy. Assistant Professor (paid also $420 for Extension 

Work ) $2,700 — $66 2,634 00 

Miss E. E. Clawson. Class Assistant (Sessional — paid also $100 from 

Child Research ) 300 00 

Psychology 
Professors : 

E. A. Bott. also Director of l>aboratory, $5,000— $155 $4,845 00 

W. E. Blatz (part time — paid also $1,955 from Child Research and 

$30 for Extension Work) $2,500 — $90 2,410 00 

Associate Professors: 

S. N. F. Chant (paid also $200 for Extension Work) $3.700 — $103 3.597 00 

W. Line, $3,600 — $99 3.501 00 

Assistsnt 1 roic^&ors i 

J. D. Ketchum (paid also $110 for Extension Work) $2.700 — $66. . 2.634 00 

G. P. Cosgrave (paid also $587.91 for Extension Work) $2,400 — $57 2,343 00 
Lecturers (Sessional) : 

K. S. Bernhardt (paid also $245 from Child Research; $1% in 

Paediatrics, and $934 for Extension Work) $2,150 — $54 2.096 00 

C. R. Myers (paid also $202.50 for Extension Work) $2,050 — $46.50 2.003 50 



2,925 00 
) 2,440 00 
1 2,440 00 


1 2.4S8 50 


2,343 00 


2,343 00 
2,100 50 


1,955 00 

1,760 00 

500 00 


5,225 00 


3,885 00 


3,885 00 


2,246 00 
1,467 50 


2,488 50 


', 3.357 00 


3,645 00 

$75,836 00 



$19,397 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 205 

K. H. Rogers. Instructor ( Sessional f $600; and for School of Nursing 

$150 (paid also S563.25 for Extension Work ) 750 00 

Class Assistants (Sessional): 

Miss D. D. Hearn (paid aJsc $489.50 as Laboratory Attendant) 

$600 — $12 .' 588 00 

J. S. Glen (paid also $374.75 for Extension Work) 500 00 

L. L. MtQuitty (Michaelmas Term — paid also $44.25 for Extension 

Work) 150 00 

Sundry- persons, substitutes for L. L. McQuitty, Easter Term 200 (X) 

H. C.'H. Miller (paid also $174.75 for Extension Work and $52.50 

for Laboratorv- cleaning I 400 GO 

H. L. Pottle (paid also $174 for Extension Work) 400 00 

D. Snvgg ( paid also $476.25 for Extension Work ) 400 00 

L. Epstein ( paid also $110 for Extension Work) 300 00 

Miss D. Millichamp (paid also $1,077.50 from Child Research) 

$300 — $7.50 292 50 

Miss M. Mason ( paid also $400 from Child Research ) 200 00 

Miss M. D. Salter 200 00 

G. H. Turner 200 00 

D. C. Williams (paid also $150 for Extension Work) 200 00 

Mrs. Hattie B. Hedman (paid also $400 from Child Research) 100 00 

Assistants for School of Nursing: 

Miss M. Rean 150 00 

G. W. Anderson (paid also $150 in Psychiatry) 100 00 

G. C. Cooper, Technician (il $2,300. less 14 davs paid bv Workmen's 

Compensation Board ; $2,217.75 — $51.95 ' ' 2,165 80 



$30,725 80 
Less paid by School of Nursing 400 00 



Italian and Spanish 

Professors : 

M. A. Buchanan (paid alst. $25 from University Press) $6.000— $205 $5,795 00 

J. E. Shaw. $6,000 — $205 5.795 00 

Emilio Goggio. $4,200 — $123 4.077 00 

Associate Professors: 

G. C. Patterson. $3,600 — $99 3.501 00 

Juan Cano. $3,600 — $99 3.501 00 

Instructors ( Sessional i : 

Miss Grace A. Elliott. $1,500 ~ $32.50 1.467 50 

H. Petersen. $1,500 — $32.50 1.467 50 



$30,325 80 



$25,604 00 



(2) Departments in University College ($157,633.30) 

Classics 

Gilbert Norwood, Professor, and Director of Classical Studies ( paid also 

$40 from University Press) $6,250 — $255 $5,995 00 

(a) Greek: 

E. T. Owen. Professor (paid also $35 from University Press) 

$4,700 — $143 .' 4.557 00 

Associate Professors: 

D. E. Hamilton. $4,200 — $123 4.077 00 

M. D. C. Tait (paid also $420 for Extension Work) $3,600 — $99 3.501 00 

(b) Latin: 
Professors : 

G. Oswald Smith (paid also $300 for Extension \^ ork ) 

$5,000 — $155 4.845 00 

E. A. Dale. $4,500 — $135 4.365 00 

Louis A. MacKay. Assistant Professor (paid also $488 for Extension 

Work) $2.950 — $73.50 2.876 50 

(c) Greek and Roman History: 

C. N. Cochrane. Professor (also Dean of Residence with free house. 

heat and light valued (a $300) $4,500 — $135 4.365 00 

Miss Marv C. Needier. Assistant Professor. $2,700 — $66 2.634 00 

B. R. English. Instructor (Sessional) $1,500 — $32.50 1.467 50 



$38,683 00 



206 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



English 
Professors: 

\I. W Wallace (paid also $1,399 as Principal of UnivCTsity College I 

$6,000 — $404 $5.5% 00 

R. S. Knox. $4,700 — $143 4,557 00 

H. J. Davis (paid also $300 for Extension Work and $32 from 

University Press t $4,500 — $135 4.365 00 

J. F. Macdonald. $4,500 — $135 4,365 00 

Associate Professors: 

W. H. Clawson, $3,800 — $107 3.693 00 

A. S. P. Woodhouse (paid also $475 from University Press) 

S3,600 — $99 3.501 00 

Assistant Professors: 

Mrs. M. M. Kirkwood (paid also $300 for Extension Work) 

$3,000 — $75 (resigned 30 June) 2,925 00 

N. J. Endicott (paid also $525 for Extension Work) $2,700 — $66.. 2,634 00 

J. R. MacGillivray. Lecturer (Sessional — paid also $1,420 for Extension 

Work) $2,550-561.50 2,488 50 

French 
Professors: 

F. C. A. Jeanneret. $5,500 — $180 $5,320 00 

T. S. Will. $5,000 — $155 4,845 00 

St. E. de Champ (paid also $400 for Extension Work) $4.500 — $135 4.-365 00 
Associate Professors: 

Louis Allen fa $4,100 (ob. 27 Aug. — salary to 31 Dec. paid to 

widow) $2,050 — $59.50 1,990 50 

H. S. McKellar ^/ $4,100 (ob. 11 Apr.) $3,416.67 — $99.17, 

$3,317.50; plus $1,000 paid to widow as compassionate allowance 4.317 50 

W. J. McAndrew (paid also $776 as Registrar of University College) 

$3,600 — $107 3,493 00 

Assistant Professors: 

H. L. Humphreys. .$3,400 — $91 3,309 00 

J. G. Andison (paid also $418 for Extension Work) $.3,300 — $87. . 3.213 00 

R. D. C. Finch. $2,950 — $73.50 2.876 50 

Lecturers (Sessional): 

ATiss \. C. Cole (paid also $532 for Extension Work) $2.3.50— $55.50 2.294 50 
X. K. Laflamme (paid also $300 for Extension Work) $2,150— $49..50 2.100 50 

Jean A. Houpert, $2,000 — $45 1,955 00 

Miss Isabel Balthazard (paid also $794 for Extension Work) 

$1,800 — $40 1.760 00 

Miss M. MacDonald (paid also $200 for Extension Work) 

SI JOO — $37.50 1,662 50 

G. L. Assie, Instructor (Sessional — paid also $782 in Forestry; $175.75 

in Dentistry, and $200 for Extension Work) $750 —$16 734 00 

German 

G. H. Needier. Professor, $5,500 — $180 (retired .30 June) $5,320 00 

Thure Hedman, Associate Professor, $4,000 — $115 3,885 00 

G. E. Holt. Assistant Professor (paid also $172 for Extension W^orkt 

$3,450 — $93 3,357 00 

Lecturers (Sessional): 

H. Boeschenstein (paid also $683.20 in Chemical Engineering and 

$450 for Extension Work) $1,950 — $47.70 1,902 30 

Victor Lange (paid also .$620 for Extension Work and $30 in 

Ontario College of Education) $1,900 — $42.50 1,857 50 

Semitic Languages 
Professors : 

W. R. Taylor. $5,500 — $180 $5320 00 

T. J. Meek. $5,200 — $165 5,035 00 

F. V. Winnett. Assistant Professor, $2,700 — $66 2,634 00 

W. S. McCullough. Lecturer ( Sessional ) $2,200 — .$51 2,149 00 

Ethics 

G. S. Brett, Professor (see also Philosophy) $1,000 — $58.50 $941 50 



$34,124 50 



$44,236 00 



$16,321 80 



$15,138 00 



$941 50 



^ UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 207 

University College General 

M. W. Wallace. Principal (see also English) $1,500 — $101 $1,399 00 

.Miss Marion B. Ferguson. Dean of Women (with living valued (o $400) 

$2,500 — $60 2.440 00 

W. J. McAndrew. Registrar (see also French) $800 — $24 776 00 

Miss M. Blackburn. Secretarv in Registrar's Office. $1,300 — $27.50. . . 1.272 50 

Miss R. Gregory. Registrar's Assistant. $950 — $19 931 00 

Miss C. Tocque. Stenographer in LInivcrsity College, $1,400 — $30 1.370 00 

A. F. W. Plumptre, Tutor in University College Men's Residence 

(Sessional — without salary but with rooms valued (<J $225) 

$8,188 50 

22. Mathematics $715,499 20 
Class room supplies ($127.08) : 

American Medical Society, dues $25 24 

University Extension, stencils, ink and paper 75 24 

University Press, printing and stationery 24 35 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight 2 25 

Clerical assistance: 

University Extension, making stencils, etc , 63 50 

$190 58 



23. Applied Mathematics 

Class room supplies ($240.98) : 

Murdock Stationery, paper $12 60 

Leonard A. Philip & Co.. calculating machine inspection 1164 

Photographic Service, slides, etc 13 25 

Postage 12 00 

Roneo Co. of Canada, stencils, paper, ink, etc 106 26 

Julius Springer, book 10 61 

University Press, books, printing and stationery 44 26 

Accounts under $10 (7) 30 36 

Clerical assistance: 

Miss A. A. Crutcher, 37y2 weeks @ $12 450 00 



24. Physics 

Laboratory and workshop supplies ($5,641.47) : 

George Adams, belting, drills, screws, etc $17 90 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. haidware 241 84 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry- 27 94 

Aluminum Co. of Canada, sheet metal 13 00 

Anaconda American Brass Ltd.. brass and copper rods 176 07 

Baird & Tatlock (London) Ltd.. brass terminals, etc 15 94 

Bakelite Corporation, tubing 19 82 

Baker & Co.. lead wire, etc 11 91 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co.. lenses, lamps, etc 25 78 

W. E. Booth Co.. lantern plates 67 94 

British Eh-ug Houses, chemicals and dyes 11 31 

Burke Electric & X-Ray Co.. valve 99 50 

Cambridge Instrument Co.. repairing thermometer 15 34 

Canada Metal Co.. castings, etc 73 67 

Canada Wire & Cable Co.. copper wire 11 01 

Canadian General Electric Co.. lamps, etc 123 18 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. acids, etc 22 97 

Canadian Johns-Manville Co., asbestos, millboard, etc 22 22 

Canadian Kodak Co.. filters, plates, etc 71 72 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware and chemicals 318 21 

Canadian National Carbon Co.. batteries, etc 71 28 

C. P. R. Telegraphs 18 66 

W alter A. Carveth. microscope lamp, films, etc 41 00 

Central Scientific Co.. mercury, glassware, etc 81 73 

F. C. Dannatt. repairs 28 04 

Dominion Carbon Brush Co., brushes 13 05 

Dominion Oxygen Co.. gas. rental of cylinders 289 65 

Eastman Kodak Stores, chemicals, plates, etc 149 53 

T. Eaton Co.. towelling, stools, etc 59 40 

Exide Batteries of Canada, batteries 21 60 

General Electric Vapor Lamp Co.. lamps 20 41 

General Radio Co.. meters, tubes, etc 110 27 

Gevaert Co. of America, photographic paper 46 81 

Goddard Bros., cartage of generatoi set 27 00 



$690 98 



208 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Griffin & Tatlock, thermometers, etc 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Ltd., tubing 

Haynes Art Gallery, framing photograph 

Adam Hilger Ltd.. photographic plates, etc 

Ilford Ltd., slides 

Imperial Oil Ltd 

Johnson. ALatthey & Co., platinum wire, etc 

L. 0. Keller, prism 

Kimble Glass Co., tubing 

P. J. Kipp & Zonen. suspension tube for galvanometer 

Lake Simcoe Ice & Fuel Ltd., ice 

Leeds & Northrup Co.. repairs to galvanometer 

E. R. Livingston, motion picture film 

W. R. McKee, electrical repairs 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, mercury 

Peckover's Ltd., steel 

Thos. Pocklington Co., graph sheets 

Postage 

Pratt & Whitney, dies, drills, etc 

J. Frank Raw Co., prints 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection 

Rolls & Darlington, ether, etc 

Roneo Co. of Canada, stencils and paper 

Sheet Polarizer Co., sheet polarizer 

Robt. Simpson Co.. blinds, towels, etc 

Stupakoff Laboratories Inc., filaments 

Toronto Hydro-Electric System, current 

Triplex Machine Tool Corporation, microscope parts 

Wholesale Radio Co., tubes, aerial, etc 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( .5.5 ) 

Sundry disbursements by departments: 

Seminar teas. $25.14; supplies, etc., $40 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $179.28; labour, $163.83; material, 

$264.38 

Apparatus ($2,093,481 : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., vise, motor, etc 

Art Metropole, magnifier 

British Drug Houses, capillator travelling outfit 

Canadian General Electric Co., henotron and magnetron 

Walter A. Carveth, meters, etc 

Central Scientific Co., oil dropping apparatus, transformer, etc 

G. Cussons Ltd., centrifugal force machine, etc 

W. Edwards & Co., pumps 

Electric Machinery Service, motor 

H. H. Gilbert, tent 

Griffin & Tatlock, galvanometers, etc 

Adam Hilger Ltd., refractometer, tesla coU, etc 

P. J. Kipp & Zonen. vacuum thermocouple, etc 

A. R. & J. E. Meylan, timer 

Rogers Radio Tubes, Ltd., transformer 

Victor X-Ray Corporation, x-ray tube, $125, less allowance on old 
tube. $25 

Weston Electrical Instrument Corporation, ammeter, etc 

Zenith Electric Co., resistances 

Accounts under $10 (2 ) 

Experimental tables, cases, books, charts, fittings, etc. ($641.58) : 

American Institute of Physics, reprints 

Adam Hilger Ltd., atlcis 

McGraw-Hill Book Co., books 

National Research Council, reprints 

Royal Society, reprints 

Sackville Shops Ltd., refinishing tables 

Subscriptions to scientific journals (5) 

Torquay Times Group, reprints 

Waverley Press, reprints 

University Press, books and reprints 

Accounts under $10 ( 13 ) 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $130.30; material, $107.90 

Laboratory and workshop assistance ($1,993.67) : 

Albert Owen, 52 weeks, 2 days 672 67 



77 56 


31 38 


19 25 


102 26 


74 82 


30 09 


42 36 


15 55 


100 97 


34 61 


51 54 


26 71 


25 00 


65 27 


18 57 


39 28 


28 00 


78 75 


31 88 


25 50 


13 40 


19 37 


54 17 


20 30 


124 57 


18 13 


174 90 


10 28 


164 04 


840 64 


243 99 


65 14 


607 49 


102 17 


10 11 


14 55 


75 60 


34 00 


189 57 


167 21 


12 94 


10 50 


17 50 


44 00 


551 79 


389 55 


15 17 


40 00 


100 00 


197 55 


103 10 


18 17 


28 87 


17 00 


14 54 


43 15 


54 78 


22 00 


41 63 


25 84 


10 23 


110 55 


34 79 


238 20 



UNIVERSITY OF TOROMO FOR 1936 209 



),355 61 



A. R. Clark, 31 weeks 403 00 

Lawrence Hughes, 43 weeks 2 days o^o nn 

Stanley Collins, 41 weeks 2 days ^H?^ 

G. N. Patterson, 4 weeks o^ J^U 

xMiss A. A. Crutcher, 4 weeks |^ "^ 

Mrs. S. Bateson, 2 weeks f" "" 

R. D. Hiscocks. 1 week ^^^ 

110,370 20 
Less credits: Laboratory deposits, $851.30; sale of material, etc., 

$163.29 l'Q14 d9 

25. Astronomy 
At University: 

Supplies (1225.51): ., 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., prisms, etc 1 7 no 

W. E. Booth Co., photographic plates 17 09 

Postage _ 

University Press, printing and stationery o^ In 

Accounts under $10 (8) •••••• 36 59 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, etc., $1.48; labour, $3.60; 

material, $40.75 45 83 

At Observatory: 

Supplies and apparatus ($1,457.71) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware -- oo 

W. E. Booth Co., photographic plates, timer, etc oi 22 

F. Y. W. Braithwaite, hardware 55 70 

British Drug Houses, chemicals and acids 25 88 

Butterfield Division. Union Twist Drill Co., drills and cutters.. 17 8o 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, acids and chemicals 31 66 

Eastman Kodak Stores Ltd., photographic plates, etc 58 91 

Gaertner Scientific Corporation, comparator 604 56 

Sir Howard Grubb-Parsons, mercury switches and mirrors 79 81 

Hamilton Gear & Machine Co., gears 14 50 

National Drug & Giemical Co., chemicals 10 79 

Photographic Service ^? nn 

Postage 12 00 

Robbins & Townsend, overhauling typewriter IZ M 

Sheppard & Gill Lumber Co., lumber 118 54 

Singer Sewing Machine, electric motor 16 87 

A. R. Williams Machinery Co., gear attachment for lath 75 50 

Professor R. K. Young, sundry disbursements 11 75 

University Press, printing and stationery 67 20 

Accounts under $10 (12) • • • 36 28 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, etc., $23.68; telephone calls, 

$7.93 ; labour, $37.15 ; material, $54.36 123 12 

Library-, including binding and mending ($476.13) : 

Gustav Fock, books ^ ^9 

Hirschwaldsche Buchhandlung, books 23 25 

Library of Congress, cards ^9 ^^ 

N. V. Martinus Nijhoff Boekhandel, books 15 22 

N. V. Swetz & Zeitlinger, books 80 28 

University Press, books, binding and stationery 261 39 

Accounts under $10 (7) 28 72 

Travelling aUowances ($300) : ,„„ „^ 

J. F. Heard 100 00 

F S Hogg 100 00 

P. M. Miflman 100 00 

Attendants and incidentals ($523.71) : 

R. B. Laing, Assistant, 2 mos., 23 days @ $80, $220; 6 nights 

ra $5, $30 250 00 

T. Mackenzie, Caretaker's overtime services, 38 periods @ $2.50, 

$95; 18 periods ^ $1.25, $22.15 117 50 

0. A. MacRae, 1 month 75 00 

E. L. Ruddy Co., painting and erecting sign 50 00 

Accounts under $10 (2) 15 68 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $15.35; material, ]8c 15 53 

$2,983 06 

Less door receipts 619 50 

$2,363 56 



210 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



26. Geology 
Maintenance < $564.36): 

Canadian Laboratorj' Supplies, chemicals, glassware, etc 

Photographic Service, slides and prints 

Postage 

Miss D. Tarr. mimeographing notes 

University Press, printing and stationer>' 

Accounts under $10 (15 ) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $186.68; material. $90.73 

Summer Field Work ($156.60) : 

Prof. E. S. Moore, honorarium 

S. E. Wolfe, honorarium. $50; expenses. $6.60 

Less credits: Sale of masnifying glasses. $9.45; containers returned. 
$10.45 ^. 

27. Mineralogy 
Maintenance and equipment: 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. acids 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals, tubing, etc 

Central Scientific Co.. glass tubing, etc 

Johnson Matthey Co.. platinum forceps 

John H. Klein & Co.. charcoal blocks 

Roofers' Supply Co.. slate 

Ward's Natural Science Establishment, specimens 

Wilson Scientific Co.. blow pipe parts, etc 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (9) 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $9.06; labour. $91.32; material 
$38.41 

Less credits: Laboratory deposits. $118.15; containers returned. 
$12.05 

28. Chemistry 
Maintenance: 
Chemistry' : 

Chemicals, glassware, apparatus, etc. ($10,476.38): 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 

Belle Ewart Co.. ice 

Christian Becker Inc.. balance 

British Drug Houses, chemicals 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. acids 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals, glassware, etc... 

Canadian Liquid Air Co.. gas and rental of cylinders 

Canadian Kodak Co.. chemicals and acids 

Central Scientific Co.. glassware, etc 

Coulter Copper & Brass Co.. condenser, still, etc 

T. Eaton Co.. sheeting, towels, etc 

Fisher Scientific Co.. glassware, crucibles, etc 

Gustav Fock. text books and journals 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Ltd.. tubing 

Paul Haack. chemicals and glassware 

Hart House, tomato juice 

O. W. Herzberg. chemicals 

M. P. Hofstetter. calculating machine 

Ingram & Bell, thermometers, glassware, etc 

Johnson. Matthey & Co.. silver crucibles, platinum wire, etc. 

P. J. Kipp & Zonen. thermopile 

W. H. Kubbinga. machine work 

W. H. F. Kuhlmann. micro-chemical balance 

E. Leybold's Machfolger. water pumps 

Longmans. Green & Co.. text books 

McGraw-Hill Book Co.. text books 

Mack Printing Co.. reprints 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, chemicals 

G. R. Marshall & Co.. lens 

E. M. Morgan, platinum, etc 



$23 


17 


33 


30 


19 


25 


22 


50 


112 


73 


76 


00 


277 


41 


100 00 


56 60 


$720 96 


' 19 


90 


$10 24 


41 


28 


12 


59 


26 


40 


36 40 


49 


79 


161 


45 


21 


22 


68 67 


42 


25 


138 


79 






$609 08 

1 


130 20 







$13 08 

16 00 
288 27 

27 86 

251 26 

1.772 24 

68 30 
105 31 

1.667 95 

97 50 

39 01 

608 93 

62 30 

160 00 

209 15 

17 52 

69 83 
270 00 
4S7 21 

80 27 
113 57 

19 75 
164 62 

20 65 
36 00 
13 07 
23 92 

70 93 
15 00 
10 00 



$701 06 



$478 88 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 211 

National Drug & Chemiccd Co., chemicals 

Office Specialty XCfg. Co., binding cases 

Ontario Cork Co., corks 

Postage 

Richardson, Bond & Wright Ltd., cards 

Spencer Lens Co., microscope 

Standard Chemical Co., spirits, acetone, etc 

Stephens Sales Ltd., mimeo paper and stencils 

Textile Products Co., towels 

Lnderwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd.. overhauling typewriter 

White & Thomas, metal plates 

Wilson Scientific Co., chemicals, glassware, etc 

University Press, printing and stationery- 

Accounts under $10 ( 15 ) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Hardware. S48.17; watch repairs, $6.25; telegrams, 
S2.13; car tickets, $1.50; stationery, chemicals, etc., 
$126.62 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. 881.80; labour. $259.33; 

material. $179.45 

Repairs and renewals: 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. S395.20; material. $103.61.. 
Clerical assistance: 

Miss A. Reeves. 60 5/6 day^ f(i S3 



22 


40 


17 


78 


253 


96 


27 


00 


34 


78 


118 


29 


53 


.3 


20 


50 


177 


12 


22 


54 


22 


55 


1,277 


65 


850 


46 


72 


85 


184 67 


520 


58 


498 81 


182 


50 



S11.157 69 



Less credits: Laboratory deposits. $2,974.05; laboratory deposit; 

reserved from 1934-35. .?2.800: containers returned. $138.68.. 5.912 73 

Physical Chemistry: 

Supplies, chemicals, etc.: 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., colorimeter and parts, $170.02; 

repairs, 89.97 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, duty on apparatus, etc 

Centralbureau voor Schimmilcultures. cultures 

R. H. Chappell, glassblowing 

R. G. Henderson & Son. copper tank 

M. P. Hofstetter. overhauling calculator 

Johnson. Matthey & Co.. crucibles, tongs, etc 

Precision Tool & Instrument Co., microscope and parts.... 

Richards Glass Co., tubes 

Sheet Polarizer Co., polarizer 

Accounts under 810 (5) 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, $13.73: labour. $11.71; 

material, $5.97 

Hectro-Chemistry : 

Supplies ($1,218.75) : 

Bell Ewart Co.. ice 

British American Oil Ltd., oil 

British Drug Houses, chemicals 

Canadian Johns-Manville Co., asbestos 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals 

Canadian National Carbon Co., carbons and electrodes 

Central Scientific Co.. metal and crucibles 

Consumers' Gas Co., oxide of iron 

Geo. Harvey, diagrams 

Johnson. Matthey & Co.. platinum wire , 

Merck & Co.. chemicals 

Peckover's Ltd., nickel wire 

Richardson. Bond & Wright Ltd., graph sheets, etc 

Toronto Hydro-Electric System 

Wholesale Radio Co., radio parts 

Williams & Wilkins, elements 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 Ol) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Hardware, $25.39; chemicals, $2.77; sundries, $3.61... 
Superintendent's Depart., freight, -$5.60; labour. $45.19; 
material. $209.70 



179 99 


28 


80 


61 


67 


74 


95 


103 


75 


30 


00 


95 


25 


49 


48 


15 


10 


20 


40 


26 


95 


31 


41 


$16 00 


12 


25 


145 R-? 


34 


39 


45 


29 


34 50 


21 


07 


10 00 


15 00 


56 


5-? 


230 


24 


13 


26 


77 63 


18 40 


11 


26 


47 


70 


77 


97 


59 


19 


31 


77 


260 49 



$5,244 96 



$717 75 



212 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Apparatus ($1,081.19) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 19 81 

Canadian Westinghouse Caj.. meters and transformers 242 26 

Scentral Scientific Co.. rheostats and heaters 23 28 

R. H. Chappell. glassblowing 34 95 

Electric Machinery Service, motors and repairs 130 25 

A. S. Hunt, glassblow'ing 24 85 

Instruments Ltd.. lens 40 00 

Johnson. Matthey & Co.. crucibles 27 70 

W. Kubbinga. machine work 101 63 

W. R. McKee, electrical work 58 36 

J. C. Morgan, material for amplifier 10 20 

Thos. Pocklington Co.. repairing balance 20 00 

Siemens Bros. & Co., oscillograph loops 16 73 

Western Electrical Instrument Co.. milliameters 72 39 

Accounts under $10 (7) 39 95 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $10; labour, $169.39; 

material. $39.44 218 83 

Laboratorv cleaning ( $24.49 ) : 

Matthew Pitkethlv. 5 davs 10 00 

J. Mallon. 341/2 hours ^G 42c 14 49 

$2,324 43 
Less credits: Sale of metal. $21.57; containers returned. 

$7.05 28 62 



29. Biology 

Laboratory and lecture room supplies ($2,949.23) : 

Canadian Kodak Co.. chemicals, etc 

Canadian Laborator>' Supplies, chemicals, glassware, etc 

Central Scientific Co.. glassware, etc 

Coleman, Bell Co.. chemicals 

Connaught Laboratories, rabbits 

Eastman Kodak Stores, holders, slides, etc , 

T. Eaton Co.. towels, rubber boots, etc 

E. Fleming, rabbits , 

J. A. Fontaine, frogs , 

Freyseng Cork Co., corks 

Gevaert Co. of America, photographic plates and paper 

J. F. Hartz Co., syringes, cover glasses, etc , 

Hazel Atlas Glass Co.. metal caps 

Holiday Flint Glass Works, vials , 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals , 

W. J. LeRay. travelling and collecting expenses 

M£dlinckrodt Chemical Works, ether, etc , 

Marine Biological Laboratory', specimens , 

Merck & Co., glycerine 

Murphy Drug Store films, etc , 

Nichols Chemical Co.. acids 

Thos. Pocklington Co., paper 

Screen & Sound Service, projector and lamps 

Standard Chemical Co.. formaldehyde , 

Stephens Sales Ltd.. mimeo paper, stencils and ink 

Surgical Supplies Ltd.. repairing microstages, etc 

Telfer Paper Box Co.. boxes 

A. H. Thomas, kymograph paper, etc 

Toronto General Hospital. Occupational Therapy Dept., rebinding 

books 

Will Corporation, staining dishes , 

Wilson Scientific Co., slides 

Universitv Press, printing and stationery , 

Accounts' under $10 (18) 

Sundry disbursements by departments 

Animals, fruit, vegetables, etc , 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $126.79; labour, $54.%; material. 
$193.74 

Museum specimens, supplies and catalogue ($280.58) : 

Concilium Bibliographicum, cards 

Genera Insectorum. specimens and subscription 





*"'""" "" 




$8,258 52 


$10 32 


68 


58 


111 


44 


10 


15 


15 


50 


23 


39 


109 


41 


117 


75 


112 


00 


20 


14 


68 


34 


77 60 


15 42 


100 24 


39 44 


104 


05 


36 


73 


202 


66 


19 00 


160 


48 


30 


17 


49 


50 


167 00 


13 38 


179 32 


18 


50 


12 


89 


13 


73 


13 


50 


17 


65 


22 


64 


503 


33 


84 37 


25 


12 


375 


49 


112 


78 


63 


53 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 213 



Accounts under $10 (6) 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 

Marine laboratories, collecting: 

W. H. Johnson 

New microscopes and accessories (11.130.43) : 

Anatomy Dept.. microscopes 

Walter A. Carveth & Co., microscope and parts 

Central Scientific Co., microscope parts, etc 

Dr. D. H. Hamly. microscope lamp 

J. S. Surgical Supplies, objectives and microscopes repaired 

Accounts under $10 (2) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $25.80; material, 14c 

Furnishings, fittings and equipment: 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $416.67; material, $546.30 

Messenger service ($400) : 

D'Arcv LeRav. 12 mos. (paid also $270 in Special Research) 

Albert Prince. 21 weeks. 3 days, (a $7 

Incidents ($520.11) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 

Postage 

Robbins & Townsend. typewTiter inspection 

Qeaning glassware; Edward Wilson, $10; Jas. Wilson, $10 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (9) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Stationery. $8.36; telegraph and telephone. $4.36; sundries, 

$27.05 ' 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $29.21; material, $13.21 

Alterations and equipment for Experimental Biology' ($16,385.22) : 
Alterations and furnishings ($10,299.06) : 

Delamere & \V illiams Ltd.. air conditioner 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. filing sections 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 

Robt. Simpson Co.. linoleum and stools 

Window Shades and Fittings, shades 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $5,499.10; material, $3,481.24.. 
Equipment and apparatus ($6,086.16) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., arc lamp 

British Drug Houses, chemicals and drugs 

A. Brock, tonometer 

Canadian Fairbank-Morse Co., hardware 

Canadian General Electric Co.. radiotrons. plugs and units.... 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, acids, glassware and tubing.... 

R. H. Chappell. glassblowing 

Walter A. Carveth & Co.. developing tank and microscope 

Central Scientific Co.. chemicals, glassware and tubing 

Christian Becker Inc.. balances 

Delamere & Williams Ltd.. motors 

Dominion Oxygen Co.. gass and rental of cylinders 

T. Eaton Co., fan and tools 

Eimer & Amend, chemicals and stop cock remover 

Eppley Laboratory Inc.. battery 

Exide Batteries of Canada Ltd.. batteries 

Fisher Scientific Co.. balance and pump 

General Steel Wares Ltd.. utensils 

Grand & Toy, lockers 

Harvard Apparatus Co.. menometer 

J. F. Hartz Co., scissors and trephines 

Ingram Sc Bell 

Prof. L. Irving, expenses collecting trout eggs 

Jem Rubber Co., bladders 

KeUog Compressor Mfg. Corporation, compressor 

Leeds & Northrup Co., galvanometers and mirrors 

Alallinckrodt Chemical Works, acids and mercury 

Marine Biological Laboratory, electrode vessel 

Northern Electric Co.. ammeters and telephone relays 

Patterson & Heward, inscription tablet 

Palo-Myers. Inc.. balances 

Frank Read, compressor, kymographs and apparatus 

A. H, Thomas, thermometers, glassware and marker 



39 


73 


64 54 


50 


00 


520 


00 


207 


50 


250 


12 


40 00 


80 68 


6 


19 


25 


94 


962 


97 


250 00 


150 00 


64 44 


65 00 


22 


90 


20 


00 


219 43 


46 


15 


39 77 


42 


42 


503 


50 


115 04 


279 25 


286 


93 


134 00 


8.980 


34 


149 


91 


85 35 


15 87 


25 


00 


79 83 


50 


78 


87 


07 


25 00 


116 


81 


1.269 


19 


130 


43 


14 


00 


10 45 


78 65 


12 35 


26 27 


20 


50 


90 34 


24 08 


101 


85 


22 


89 


30 05 


52 41 


16 00 


16 00 


53 


71 


274 71 


129 


29 


86 49 


43 


13 


55 


12 


380 54 


1.049 40 


3.54 


40 



214 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Toronto Radio & Sports Ltd., stop watches 

Torsion Balance Co., balances 

Wall Chemicals Ltd., dioxide and gas regulator 

Willard Storage Battery Co., batteries 

Wholesale Radio Co., radio parts 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 18; 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Animal food, $9.80; hardware, $44.92; sundries, $42.58 

stationery and telegrams, $12.70 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $93.71; labour, $434.11 
material, $127.98 



Less credits: Laboratory deposits, $915.73; sale of microscopes 
$540; sale of material, $20.19; charged to School of Nursing, 
$300; alterations, etc., charged to Hoskin Bequest, $16,385.22 

30. Botany 
Laboratory, office. Museum and Herbarium supplies, expenses at 
Temagami, etc. ($3,732.%) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 

American Instrument Co., regulators, heaters, etc 

Miss E. Binns. herbarium assistance, 1 month, 6 days 

British Drug Houses, acids and chemicals 

Brown Bros., corrugated paper 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals and glassware 

Canadian Pad & Paper Co., niimeo paper 

\i alter A. Carveth & Co., microscope attachments, etc 

Central Scientific Co., chemicals, glassware, etc 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd., laboratory coats 

Corning Glass Works, centrifuge tubes 

T. Eaton Co., first-aid equipment, utensils, etc 

Fisher Scientific Co., clamps, holders, tubing, etc 

Grand & Toy, binders, covers and stapler 

Earl M. Grose, fertilizer 

Fred W. Halls Paper Co., paper 

J. F. Hartz Co., boxes, glassware, stain, etc 

R. G. Henderson & Son, repairs to refrigerating cabinet 

Johnson & Johnson, non-absorbent cotton 

Kelvinator of Canada Ltd., service and repairs 

Kilgour's Ltd., bags 

Mrs. M. Langley, washing cloths 

J. Lanoie, cutting wood, repairing outboard motor 

Lowe-Martin Co., transfer cases 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, chemicals 

Miss J. Millsap, clerical assistance, 65^/4 hours 

Parisian Laundry Co 

Postage 

Provincial Treasurer, rental of Bear Lsland lot 

Richards Glass Co., bottles and caps 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 

R. C. Russell, specimens 

Safety Supply Co., gas mask 

W. J. Schempff. si>ecimens 

Screen & Sound Service, lens, etc 

Jos. E. Tilden, cards and indexes 

Percy Train, specimens 

F. Verdoorn, periodicals 

T. 0. \V eigel, periodicals 

Wilson Scientific Co.. chemicals, glassware, etc 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (35) 

Sundry members of staff, expenses at Bear Island Laboratory, etc.: 

J. W. Groves 

H. S. Jackson 

P. V. Krotkov 

L. O. Overholt 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Postage. $14; telegrams, etc.. $17.%; supplies. $62..59; travelling 
and collecting expenses, $150.31 



10 98 


85 22 


11 25 


16 76 


115 64 


30 00 


72 64 


110 00 


655 80 


$22,678 54 


! 18,161 14 



$24 03 


65 49 


75 00 


26 


09 


11 


13 


162 37 


22 05 


61 


50 


352 90 


29 45 


11 83 


11 


39 


118 52 


125 38 


10 00 


38 


25 


23 


84 


10 30 


39 90 


60 


85 


22 69 


27 68 


11 


00 


37 


50 


56 


27 


32 62 


47 


40 


102 


50 


10 


00 


32 


43 


15 60 


15 


19 


20 00 


34 20 


10 


50 


30 


26 


50 


30 


34 97 


21 


14 


298 


37 


425 


99 


178 


45 


31 


95 


50 


70 


9 50 


87 09 



$4,517 40 



244 86 



_ UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 215 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, etc.. $114.42; labour, $182.26; 

material. $216.85 513 53 

Botanic Gardens and Greenhouse supplies, materials and labour 
($1,236.70): 
Assistant Gardeners: 

W. M. C. Chilton, 2,2% hours 

Wm. A. Clark. 312 hours 

Miss K. Simpson. 87 hours 

Fred Adams, bulbs and plants 

Canada Metal Co.. lead ribbon for labels 

Clark & McFarlane. plant tubes , 

Dale Estate, peat and fibre 

S. Evans, soil 

E. & H. Gilbert, labels 

Alex. McKay Co.. stone and sand 

Medicine Hat Pottery' Co., pots 

Ed. Webb & Sons, seeds, etc 

Accounts under $10 ( 13) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Hardware. $10.46; seeds. $5.80; sundries, $8.99; collecting 

expenses. $1.50 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $50.76; material. $86.63 

Painting interior of plant houses: 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 

Special equipment for new building ($2,995.06) : 

Art Metropole, centrifuge 

Walter A. Carveth & Co., microscope 

Fisher Scientific Co.. distilling apparatus 

Julien P. Friez & Sons, hygro-thermograph 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co., resurfacing walks in greenhouse... 

Mitchell & McGill. chairs 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. herbarium cases. $606.97; filing cases, 

$225.83 : trays and sections, $97.51 

Screen & Sound Service, microscope and parts. $452.50; cameras. $72 

H. W. Spence. microscope lamps 

Accounts under $10 ( 2 ) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $611.92; material, $380.67 

Less credits: Laboratory deposits 

31. History 
Class room supplies ($155.70) : 

Postage 

L'niversity of Chicago Press, maps, etc 

University Press, printing and stationery, etc 

Accounts under $10 ( 4 > 

Sundry disbursements by department 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $1.47; labour. $2.4€ 

Clerical assistance: 

Miss F. Hahn. 8 mos 800 00 

Research expenses ($108.31): 
Travelling expenses: 

Prof. Chester Martin 

Miss M. F. McLean 

Miss G. M. Fatt 

Mrs. L. B. Martyn 

Miss M. M. L. Clark 

N. Penlington 

32. Anthropology 
Class room supplies: 

University Press, stationery 

Ethnological Field Work: 

Prof. T. F. Mcllwrailh, travelling expenses 

33. Archaeology 
Class room supplies: 

Photographic Service, lantern service and slides 



601 


90 


72 


40 


19 


75 


59 84 


12 


30 


90 


00 


15 


00 


10 


50 


19 


25 


37 


07 


19 


71 


60 


08 


54 


76 


26 


75 


137 


39 


249 87 


82 


50 


32 


00 


14 


70 


162 


56 


127 


20 


25 


25 


930 


31 


! 524 50 


90 


00 


13 


45 


992 


59 


$8,214 59 


698 


52 




f7 '^lf\ 07 






$22 40 


56 03 


42 


25 


26 


25 


4 


90 


3 


87 



41 


60 




17 


78 




17 


78 




15 


30 




11 


35 




4 50 








$1,064 01 






$5 


78 




25 20 








$30 98 


$395 52 







$395 52 



216 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

34. Fine Art 

Fitting up office, photograph cabinet, screens, etc. ($433.56) : 

T. Eaton Co., chairs 

Grand & Toy, partitions for slide cabinet, etc 

Mitchell & McGill, desk, table, etc 

Steelcraft Shop, chair 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $223.16; material, $87.47 

Slides, journals and stationery, use of lantern and operator ($456.20) 

National Gallery, slides 

Chatham Pexton, slides 

Photographic Service, lantern service and slides 

Screen & Sound Service, slides 

University of London, slides 

Accounts under $10 (4) 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, etc., $23.88; labour, $1.09 

Sundry equipment ($877.73) : 

Art (iallery of Toronto, reproduction 

Medici Society, canvas mounts 

Norman C. Reid, framing prints 

University of Toronto Library, books, etc 

University Press, books 

Accounts under $10 (2) 

Prof. John Afford, postcards, etchings, photographs and books.. 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight 



$16 83 


10 60 


71 50 


24 00 


310 63 


23 76 


35 36 


188 75 


36 60 


120 25 


26 51 


24 97 


12 50 


424 98 


1% 76 


89 50 


28 45 


7 90 


100 00 


17 64 


$1,767 49 


877 73 


$1 82 


70 00 


114 24 


96 05 


14 00 


10 00 


13 91 


60 00 



Less charged to J. W. L. Forster Fund 

34a. Geography 
Supplies and equipment ($320.02) : 

Bernard Cairns, stamp 

Grand & Toy, card sections and transfer cases 

Photographic Service, slides and prints 

Chas. Potter, lantern and screen, $70; projector, slide covers, etc. 
$26.05 ♦ 

Receiver- General of Canada, specimens of rock fossils and prints. . 

Prof. Griffith Taylor, sundry disbursements 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Assistance, A. H. Black 

35. Political Economy 

Office and class room supplies ($669.03) : 

Jas. McDowell & Co., inspection of calculator $42 00 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 44 82 

Postage 169 00 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter, $85, less $10 allowance on old 

machine, $75 ; inspection, etc., $19.10 94 10 

Stephens Sales Ltd., mimeo paper, stencils and ink 53 75 

University Press, printing and stationery 224 05 

Accounts under $10 (3) 16 46 

Sundry disbursements by department: telegrams 17 22 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, etc., $2.55; labour, $3.20; material, 

$1.88 7 63 

Qerical assistance ( $1,700) : 

Miss J. I. Horrell, 10 mos., $1,000 — $20 980 00 

Miss A. Saunders, SVs mos. (paid also $50 in Social Science) 440 00 

Miss K. Harkness, 31/2 mos 280 00 

$2,369 03 
Less credit : Rebate on subscription 1 12 

36. Philosophy 
Class room supplies: 

Miss H. DesBrisay, typing $62 00 

Wm. Haines, photograph framed 85 

Photographic Service, lantern service 1 00 

University Press, printing and stationery 19 58 



$889 76 



$380 02 



^367 91 



$83 43 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 217 

37. Psychology 

Supplies ($1,314,661 : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware $134 79 

Central Scientific Co.. chemicals, etc 12 91 

D. Gestetner (Canada) Ltd.. ink, stencils, etc 145 84 

Harvard Apparatus Co.. magnet 10 37 

Geo. M. Hendr>- Co.. coloured paper 11 57 

Lockharf's Camera Exchange, plates, cover glasses, etc 14 35 

Marietta Apparatus Co., tests 10 57 

Postage 46 50 

Psychology Corporation, questionnaires, scoring scales, etc 24 51 

G. G. Renneker, reprints 18 17 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection 22 40 

John B. Smith & Sons, lumber 78 98 

World Book Co.. tests 35 55 

University Press, printing and stationery 376 58 

Accounts' under SIO (18) 66 4S 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Hardware. $22.15: food for animals. S24.30; sundries. S28.55... 75 00 
Superintendent's Dept.. freight, etc.. $36.77; labour. $24.80; material. 

$168.52 230 09 

Apparatus and equipment ($600.43) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 3 45 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co.. tangent meter 18 61 

Bodine Electric Co.. motors, etc 63 40 

R. C. Bush, chronograph repaired 12 25 

Consolidated Optical Co., ophthalmograph 228 00 

Electrical Engineering Dept., meters 15 (X) 

Radio Trade Supply Co., converter and oscillograph 190 00 

Screen & Sound Service, negatives and filter 23 00 

University Press, printing and stationery 34 90 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $9.03; material. $2.79 11 82 

Clerical assistance: 

Mrs. W. Mussen. 12 mos.. $950 — $19 931 00 

Laboratory attendance ($839.50) : 

Miss D. D. Hearn. 12 mos. (paid also $588 as Qass Assistant) 

$500 — 110.50 489 50 

Miss G. Evans. 12 mos. (paid also $350 from Child Research) 350 00 

Laboratory cleaning ($71.40) : 

H. C. H, Miller. 7 weeks 52 50 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 18 90 



38. Italian and Spanish 

Class room supplies and clerical assistance: 

Miss M. French, clerical assistance. 257 hours $179 90 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection 1 20 

University Press, printing and stationery 3 03 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $10.10; material, $7.85 17 95 

39. University* College Departments 
Class room supplies: 
Classics ($53.21) : 

Oxford University Press, text book 

L'niversity Press, printing and stationery 

English: 

University Press 

French ($167.50) : 

Miss G. E. Cole, records 

Libraire Garneau. books 

Linguaphone Institute, records 

G. E. Stechert. books 

University Press, printing and stationery 

German : 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., transfer cases 

Semitics ($67.90) : 

Photographic Service, prints 

Chas. Potter, slide boxes 

University Press, printing and stationery 



$6 60 


46 


61 


12 


19 


22 


00 


11 


25 


12 


00 


11 


06 


111 


19 


4 89 


1 


15 


5 00 


61 


75 



,756 99 



$202 08 



$305 69 



218 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

40. Umversitv College General Expenses 

Office supplies, stationery, printing and incidentals ($1,138.49) : 

D. Gestetner (Canada) Ltd., stencils and paper $111 90 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. cabinets 70 27 

Postage 131 00 

Registrar's Office, cards 10 50 

Robbins & TowTisend. typewriter inspection 27 30 

University Press, printing and stationery 757 21 

Accounts under $10 (3 ) 13 10 

Sundry disbursements by Registrar 13 36 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. S3.63; material, 22c 3 85 

Messenger ser\'ice ($444.28) : 

C. Collinson. 43 weeks, 3 days 434 28 

Miss E. H. McAndrew. 20 hours 10 00 

Sundry expenses of the Principal ($121) : 

Robt. Simpson Co., catering. First Year Reception and Scholarship 

Tea 115 00 

A. Bain, overtime services re reception 3 00 

F. Borebank. overtime services re reception 3 00 



41. University College Building 

Heat and light $5,051 58 

Gas. S74..56; water. §148.26 222 82 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 401 41 

Cleaning (-54.551.61 ) : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 30 95 

New York Window Cleaning Co 47 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 4,473 66 

Repairs and renewals I $5,273.31) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son, shades 15 57 

T. Eaton Co.. supplying and laying linoleum 44 10 

Hobbs Glass Mfg. Co.. re-silvering mirror 25 00 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co., repairs 10 64 

Johnson Temperature Regulating Co., adjusting control 19 00 

Routerv' Bros., plaster repairs 78 90 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $3,814.55; material, $1.265.55 5,080 10 

Caretaker. A. Bain. 12 mos. to .30 June. $1.500 —$32.50; (and overtime. 

$263 ) 1.467 50 

$16,968 23 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant.. $5,051 58 
Sundry credits: Repairs, $414.64; cleaning. 

$333.12; supplies, $35 782 76 

$5,834 34 



42. McLennan Laboratory (Physics) 

Heat and liaht $5,014 64 

Gas, $157.73; water. $4.58.75 616 4S 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 147 21 

Qeaning ($1,426.64) : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 12 24 

Canadian Cleaning Co.. window cleaning 30 00 

Melrose Window Cleaning Co 8 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 1,376 40 

Repairs and renewal? ($2,225.06) : 

Wm. Bartlett & .Son. shades 11 69 

Citv Treasurer, elevator license 5 00 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co.. repairs 24 98 

Tnhnson Temperature Regulating Co., repairs 58 51 

W. H. Kelley. repairs to couch 10 00 

Suoerintendent's Dept.. labour, $1.466.21 ; material. $648.67 2.114 88 

Caretaker. Horace Hill, 12 mos. to 30 June, $1,450 — $31.25 (and 

overtime. $85) 1.418 75 

$10,848 78 



$1,703 77 



$11,133 89 



UiNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 219 



Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant... S5.014 64 
Credit for cleaning 18 00 



5,032 64 



43. Chemical Biilding 

Heat and light $2,129 81 

Gas. $317.49: water, $239.83 557 32 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 134 49 

Cleaning (Sl.601.61i : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundr>- 23 01 

^«ew York ^X'indow Cleaning Co 16 50 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 1.562 10 

Repairs and renewals (S844.18I: 

Wm. Bartlett & Son. shades 16 55 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $584.02; material, $243.61 827 63 

Caretaker (paid as laboratory assistant with rooms, heat and light valued 

Co $420. chargeable against building and included in above) 



Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant... $2,129 81 
Credit for cleaning 3 00 



$5,267 41 
2.132 81 

44. BlOLOCICAL BnLDING 

Heat and light S2.640 95 

Gas. $58.08 ; water. $262.11 320 19 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 190 57 

Cleaning ($1.802.43 J : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundn. 16 68 

New York Window Qeaning Co 25 50 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 1.760 25 

Repairs and renewals ($1,944,241 : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son. shades 61 81 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 69 15 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $1,353.56: material. $459.72 1.813 28 

Caretaker. A. J. Wright. 12 mos. to 30 June (with rooms, heat and light 

valued (5 $300) $1,100 — $22.50 (and overtime. SI ) 1.077 50 



Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant. . . S2.640 95 
Sundrj' credits: Cleaning. $32; supplies. S32 64 00 



45. Botanical Building 



$7,975 88 
2.704 95 



Heat and light S5.505 17 

Gas. $75.95: water. S4O1.20 477 15 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 195 94 

Qeaning ($l.%4.69i : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 20 17 

New York Window Cleaning Co 44 50 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 1.900 02 

Repairs and renewals ($1,161,351 : 

John Inglis Co.. repairs to boiler 15 03 

W. Sherwood & Sons, motor repairs 12 00 

^ indow Shades & Fittings, shades 92 50 

Accounts under $10 (4) 25 70 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $697.17; material. $318.95 1.016 12 

Caretaker. Thos. Buchanan. 12 mos. to 30 June. $1.350 — 128.75 1.321 25 



Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant... $5,505 17 
Credit for cleaning 1700 



$10,625 55 
5.522 17 



$5,816 14 



S3.134 60 



$5,270 93 



$5,103 38 



220 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



46. Baldwin House (History) 

Light $139 78 

Fuel ($497.77) : 

Central Coal Co 284 10 

Elias Rogers Co 213 21 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 46 

Gss, $9.36; water, $58.08 67 44 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 57 38 

Cleaning ($161.20) : 

Toronto Window Cleaning Co 6 25 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 154 95 

Repairs and renewals: 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $536.37; material, $167.67 704 04 

Caretaker, G, A. Town, 12 mos. to 30 June. $1.350 — $28.75 (and 

overtime, $7.50) 1.321 25 

$2,948 86 

Less light charged to Central Power Plant $139 78 

Credit for cleaning 43 00 

182 78 



$2,766 08 



47. No. 43 St. George Street 

Light 

Fuel: 

Central Coal Co 

Gas, $8.56 ; water, $8.10 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 

Qeaning and furnaceman ($426.32) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 

Melrose Window Cleaning Co 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 

Repairs and renewals ($122.05) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son, shades 

Delamere & Williams Ltd., auto-check for furnace 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $85.80; material, $18.19 

Less light charged to Central Power Plant 



$37 66 



188 97 
16 66 


42 78 


6 24 

5 00 

415 08 


9 24 

8 82 

103 99 


$834 44 
37 66 



$796 78 



48. No. 45 St. George Street (Law) 

Light $48 54 

Fuel ($405.70) : 

Central Coal Co 180 81 

Elias Rogers Co 222 45 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 2 44 

Gas, $35.28; water $10.14 45 42 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 56 10 

Cleaning ($188.54) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry- 3 84 

Melrose Window Cleaning Co 2 50 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 182 20 

Repairs and renewals ($412.46) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son, shades 12 94 

T. Eaton Co., linoleum 25 92 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $305.39; material, $68.21 373 60 

Caretaker. R. Brown, 12 mos. to 30 June (with rooms, heat and light 

valued f?/ $300) $950 —$19 931 00 

$2,087 76 

Less light charged to Central Power Plant $48 54 

Credit for cleaning 6 50 

- 55 04 



$2,032 72 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 221 

i9. No. 47 St. George Street ( Applied \Bathematics ) 

Fuel ($308.89) : 

Central Coal Co $88 36 

Elias Rogers Co 220 03 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 50 

Electric current, $56.47 ; water, $8 64 47 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 25 26 

Cleaning and furnaceman ($239.42) : 

Melrose Window Cleaning Co 2 50 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 236 92 

Repairs and renewals ($268,231 : 

L. Freeborn, fans and motor 15 50 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 23 20 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $198.65; material, $30.88 229 53 



$906 27 

Less credit for cleaning 2 00 

50. Economics Building 

Light $5 38 

Fuel: 

Great Lakes Coal Co 1.983 90 

Gas, $89.07; electric current, $1,153.32; water, $103.70 1,346 09 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 191 22 

Cleaning and fireman ($2,785.22) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 33 12 

New York Window Cleaning Co 27 50 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 2.724 60 

Repairs and renewals ($1,799.34) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son, shades 16 54 

Canadian Germicide Co., vendor 19 80 

John Inglis Co., boiler repairs 91 68 

Patterson & Heward, brass sign 25 97 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 30 55 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1,151.80; material, $463 1,614 80 

Caretaker. Jas. McCormack, 12 mos. to 30 June ( with rooms valued (O 

$100) $1,100 — $22.50 (and overtime, $144 1 1.077 50 

Installing new boiler ($1,813.50) : 

John Inglis Co., smoke breeching 85 26 

Ontario Ready Mix Concrete Ltd, cement 77 98 

Waterous Ltd., steam heating boilers 1.299 47 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $312.35; material. $38.44 350 79 

$11,002 15 

Less light charged to Central Power Plant 5 38 

Sundry credits: sale of boiler, etc., $15.60; 

supplies. $1.40; light. $10.90; cleaning. $22.35 50 25 

55 63 



51. Psychology Building 

Light $67 50 

Fuel ($725.97) : 

Central Coal Co 724 77 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 1 20 

Gas, $15.04; electric current. $62.76; water, $24 101 80 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 70 17 

Cleaning and furnaceman ($1,039.76) • 

Allen Mf2. Co.. laundry 6 00 

Toronto Window Cleaning Co 9 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 1,024 76 

Repairs and renewals ($569.05) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son, shades 6 87 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $416.65; material, $145..53 562 18 

$2,574 25 

Less light charged to Central Power Plant $67 50 

Credit for cleaning 5 00 

$72 .50 



$904 27 



$10,946 52 



$2,501 75 



222 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



52. David Dunlap Observatory 
Fuel: 

Central Coal Co 

Electric current 

Sundries ($1,794,241 : 

Patterson & Reward, inscription plates 

N. L. Piper Railway Supplies Ltd.. sprinklers 

Toronto Salt V orks. salt 

Telephone: 

Bell Telephone Co., service, $49.%; long distance calls, $3.01. 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $1,397.75; material, $228.90 

Caretaker. Thos. McKenzie. 12 mos. to 30 June (with quarters valued @ 
$180 — and overtime, $117.50) 

Less credits: Heal, ilght and water (Prof. Chant) $72; sale of tank 
and pump, $25 



$238 80 
718 18 




21 20 
32 00 
61 42 




52 97 
1,626 65 




720 00 




$3,471 22 




97 00 


$3,374 22 






$814,533 30 



I 



VL FACULTY OF MEDICINE 
53. Salaries 



Administration 

J. G. FitzGerald. Dean (paid also in Connaught Laboratories and $4,845 

as Director of School of Hygiene I $1,000 — $50 

E. S. Ryerson. Assistant Dean and Secretary of Faculty, and Assistant 
Professor of Surgers (paid also $387 in Dentistry and $5 for Post 

Graduate Course I $5,000 — $162 

Assistants: 

Miss W. Jones. $1,800 — $40 

Miss O. Russell. $1,750 — $38.75 

Miss A. Perry, Clerk. $1,500 — $32.50 

Messenger. H. Saunders 

Hospital Theatre. Toronto General Hospital: 

Chas. Hart. Attendant. $1,550 — $33.75 (and overtime. $3) 

Robt. Murray, Attendant in Cloak room. 30 weeks (a $15 

Anatomy 
Professors : 

J. C. Boileau Grant. $7,000 — $405 

W. H. Piersol. Histology and Embnology, <fij $5,100, of which half 

charged to Biologv. $2,550 — $80 

J. C. Watt. $4.800 — $147 

H. A. Gates. Associate Professor (paid also $245 from Child Research) 

$3,700 — $108 

Assistant Professors: 

\rthur W. Ham. $3,700 — $103 

R. K. George. $3,100 — $79 

Assistants in Histologv (Sessional) : 

H. D. Ball (paid also $150 in Athletics and Physical Training — 

Women, and $150 for Extension Work I 

M. H. Book 

Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

>L J. Wilson. X-Ray (paid also $400 from Medical Research, 

Best Fund ) 

Miss K. McMurrich (paid also $150 in Athletics and Physical 

Training — Vi omen ) 

W. R. Fletcher 

M. C. Watson 

W. S. Anderson (paid also $400 in Physiology) 

H. M. Coleman (paid also $250 in Physiology) 

C E. A. Hassard 

C. A. Armstrong (paid also $25 as Prosector — see below; and 

$250 from Medical Research. Best Fund) 

Ir\ing D. Kitchen 

A. W. M. White 

A. N. McKillop 



$950 00 



4.838 00 

1.760 00 

1.711 25 

1.467 50 

800 00 

1,516 25 
450 00 



J6,595 00 

2.470 00 
4.653 00 

3,592 00 

3,597 00 
3.021 00 



500 00 
500 00 



400 00 



550 00 


500 00 


500 00 


300 00 


200 00 


200 00 


150 00 


150 00 


125 00 


150 00 



$13,493 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



223 



Embryology- : 

A. E. Ashenliurst 

J. S. Chaikoff .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' 

Neurolog>': 

W. E. L. Sparks (paid also $100 in Health Service I 

T. G. Heaton 

C M. Warren 

w. G. Young ; ; 

R. C. Laird ( paid also $150 in Surgery I 

Eugene Montgomery. Dental Anatomy 

Prosectors ( Sessional ) : 

E. M. Davidson ( also Artist I 

Brock Brown 

C. R. Rapp ■■■■.■ 

C. A. Armstrong (see also above) 

H. Le.Masurier. Senior Technical Assistant, S1.800 — S40 

H. F. Whittaker, Technical Assistant (paid also $117.60 in Dentistrv ) 

1700 — $14 '. . 

Miss G. Dowsley. Clerical Assistant. SI. 250 — $26.25 

Laboratory Assistants : 

H. McCormick (paid also $10 in Dept. of Surgery) $1,650 — $36.25 

Stephen George. S1.450 — $31.25 ' 

Chas. Storton, Laboratory- Boy 

B. L. Guyatt. Museum Curator. $1,550 — $33.75 



Less paid by School of Nursing. 



Pathology and Bacteriology 

Professors : 

Oskar Klotz, S7.000 — $405 

W. L. Holman. Bacteriology, also Associate Director of .\pplied 

Bacteriology, 85.000 — $155 

W. L. Robinson. Pathology, also Associate Director of Applied 

Pathology. $2,200 — $51 . '. 

G. Shanks. Assistant Professor. Pathology 

H. K. Detweiler. Associate Director, Serology (Sessional — without 

salary ; paid in Medicine I 

W. Magner, Special Lecturer. Pathology ( Sessional ) 

Lecturers ( Sessional ) : 

Pathology: 

G. Lyman Duff, $1,700 — $37.50 

J. E. Bates 

I. H. Erb (without salary — paid $10 for Post Graduate Worki 

P. H. Greey, Bacteriology, $1,800 — $40 

Dr. R. Margarite Price. Bacteriology and Serology, $3,000 — $75... 

Fellows, each 11 mos. : 

Pathology: 

W. A. D. Anderson. $1,000 — $20 

W. L. Donohue. $1.000 — 820 

F. C. Preston, Bacterioloav. 81.000 - $20 

Ross Robertson, Museum, Sl.OOO — $20 

Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

Pathology: 

J. C. Paterson 

T. H. Belt I .,, , , 

r, TT 1 T \'^ J I witnout salary 

Ur. Helen L. V anderveer ' - 

Bacteriology : 

E. J. Clifford 

J. E. Josephson..^ . . . , 

f. Af • D V without salary 

Dr. Marion Koss. f ■ 

Assistants in Laboratory: 

Miss N. V-. Simpson. Pathology. $1,500 — $32.50 

Miss H. M. Boyd. Bacteriology. $1,020 — $20.50 

Miss M. G. Hein. Technician, $1,140 — $23.-50 

Miss Amelia Alvey. Special Technician, $1.020 — $20.50 

Laboratory Attendants for Preparing Media: 

Miss E. A. Gordon, Senior Technician. 11 mos.. $1,200 — $25 

Attendants: 

Miss C. Wallace. $840 — $16.80 

.Albert Vowles 



50 


00 


50 


00 


55 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


40 


00 


30 


00 


300 00 


900 


00 


50 


00 


''^ 


no 


25 


00 


1.760 


00 


686 00 


1.223 


75 


1.613 


75 


1.418 


75 


480 


00 


1.516 


25 



$38,501 50 
200 00 



$6,595 


00 


4.845 00 


2.149 
250 


00 
00 


750 00 


1,662 
200 


50 
00 


1.760 
2.925 


00 
00 


980 00 
980 00 
980 00 
980 00 



500 00 





200 00 


1,467 


50 


999 


50 


1,116 


50 


999 


50 


1,175 00 


823 


20 


600 00 



1,301 50 



224 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Miss G. K. R. Boyd. Secretary. $1,260 — S26.50 1.233 50 

Miss H. M. Hammond. Librarian and Assistant Secretary. Sl,020 — $20.50 999 50 

Miss V. L. McKinnon. Mtiseum Stenographer. $1,260 — $26.50 1,233 50 

J. F. Payne. Preparator. $1,800 — $40 1.760 00 

Miss Erna Eck. Junior Attendant in Museum 600 00 

Autopsy Recorder: 

Miss Eva Cameron. 2 mos. to 31 Aug.. $160 — $3.20 1.56 80 

Miss Margaret Wightman. 10 mos. from 1 Sept.. $790— $12.80 777 20 

Miss G. F. Johnston. Autopsy Technician. $960 — $19.20 940 80 

$40,639 00 
Division of Neuropathology: 

E. A. Linell. Professor. $4,500 — $135 4,365 00 

Dr. Mary I. Tom. Fellow (Sessional) $1,800 — $40 1.760 00 

Technicians: 

Miss H. P. Tett, $1,020 — $20.50 999 50 

Miss V. O. Potter. Medicine and Surgerv (resigned) $1,020 

— $20.50 '. 999 50 

Miss C. A. Bell. Secretarv, $1,020 — $20.50 999 50 



$49,762 50 



Pathological Chemistry 

Andrew Hunter. Professor (paid also in Connaught Laboratories I 

§6.000 — $205 $5,795 00 

T. F. Nicholson. Assistant Professor. $3,150 — $81 3.069 00 

R. W. I. Urquhart, Lecturer ( Sessional ) $1,000 — $20 980 00 

Demonstrators (Sessional): 

D. L. Selby 600 00 

D. H. Boddington 500 00 

Fellows (Sessional): 

S. H. Jackson, $1,100 — $22.50 1.077 50 

J. B. Scott. $1,100 —$22.50 1.077 50 

Lome D. Proctor. Assistant (Sessional — paid also $393.75 from Medical 

Research. Banting) 250 00 

C. E. Downs. Technician. $1,500 — $32.50 1,467 50 

Laboratory Assistants: 

Miss R. A. Welsh, $1,100 — $22.50 1.077 50 

H. Downs. 9% mos. from 16 Sept.. 1870.83 — $17.71 853 12 

Laboratory Attendants: 

Mrs. J. Faulds 750 00 

Mrs. C. McCallum 350 00 

Miss C. A. Shannon, Secretary, $1,100 — $22.50 1.077 50 

Pharmacy and Pharmacology 

V. E. Henderson. Professor, $6,000 — $205-. $5,795 00 

G. H. W. Lucas. Associate Professor. $3,600 — $99 3,501 00 

M-. H. Roepke. Lecturer (Sessional ) $2,000 — $45 1.955 00 

W. R. Cameron. Fellow, 4 mos. to 31 Oct. (resigned) $500 — $10.84 .. . 489 16 
Assistants (Sessional) : 

J. F. A. Johnston (paid also $784 in Ophthalmology) $150 — $3.... 147 00 

J. M. Scott l"^^ '^'^ 

A. Brock. Technical Assistant. $2,000 — $45 1,955 00 

Qeaners: 

J. Brickies. 6 mos. to 31 Dec. i paid also $444.78 in Ontario College 

of Education ) $580 — $12 568 00 

Chester Codner. 6 mos. from 1 Jan. (paid also $338.77 as messenger. 

Convocation Hall. etc. ) $580 — $12 568 00 

A. C. Morrison 460 00 

Miss D. Caldecott, Clerical Assistant 550 00 

Bio-Chemistry 

H. Wasteneys. Professor. $6,000 — $205 $5,795 00 

Associate Professors: 

G. F. Miarrian. $4,200 — $123 4.077 00 

A. M. Wynne. $3,600 — $99 3,501 00 

Senior Fellows (Sessional) : 

B. F. Crocker (paid also $196 in Special Research) $1,300 — $28.50 1.271 50 

Mrs. Florence Ignatieff. $1.200— $25 1.175 00 

V. Ignatieff (paid also $1% in Special Research) $1,050 — $22.25 1.027 75 



$18,924 62 



$16,158 16 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



225 



Fellows (Sessional!: 

A. W. A. Brown 

G. Butler 

A. D. Odell. 3 mos 

S. L. Cohen (paid also $100 in Special Research) 

Miss M. Delamere. Secretarial Assistant. $1,300 — S27.50 

Technicians: 

J. W. Fletcher. Senior. S1.600 — $35 

L. Sloan. S1.600 — $35 

J. H. McClarv. Sl.OOO — $20 

Miss D. I. Skill. $1,000 — $20 

Laboratory Assistants: 

G. Lombard. $1,000 — $20 

W. Clough. Sl.OOO — $20 

Laboratory Attendant : 

Mrs. E. E. Davies, 5 mos. to 30 Nov 

Mrs. Ethel Wilkie, 7 mos. from 1 Dec 

Physiology 
Professors : 

C. H. Best (paid also in Connauplu Laboratories and S2.500 from 

Medical Research. Best Fund I $6,000 — $205 

N. B. Taylor. $4.500 — $135 

Assistant Professors: 

E. T. Waters (paid also $440 for Extension Work) $2,750 — $67.50 

C. B. Weld (part time — paid also $5 for Post Graduate Course) 

$] .700 — $37.50 

E. Fidlar. Lecturer and Research Associate. $1,500 — $32.50 

J. Markowitz, Research Associate (Sessional — part timet 

C. G. Smith. Demonstrator (Sessional) $1.500 — $32.50 

Fellows (Sessional) : 

R. B. Kerr 

W. S. Anderson (part time — paid also $300 in Anatomy) 

A. C. R. McGonigle 

H. M. Coleman ( paid also $200 in Anatomy) 

Miss Mabel Cory. Departmental Librarian. $1,250 — $26.25 

Miss Doris Secord. Secretarial Assistant. $1.250 — $26.25 

A. Elliott, Mechanician. $1,800 — $40 

F. L. Robinson. Technical Assistant and Glassblower (paid also $490 
from Medical Research. Best Fund) $2,000 — $50 

W. Huntley, Laboratory Assistant for Teaching Laboratories, $1,400— $30 

G. L. Robinson. Animal Caretaker. $1,200 — $25 

A. D. Crouch. Assistant Animal Caretaker. $900 — $18 



Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 

Professors (paid also in Connaught Laboratories) : 

J. G. FitzGerald (part time — see also Administration and School of 

Hvgiene ) 

R. D. Defries, Hygiene and Epidemiology (part time — paid also 

$1,955 in School of Hygiene) $1.500 — $50 $1,450 00 

D. T. Eraser. $4,500 — $135 4.365 00 

P. J. Moloney. Associate Professor (see School of Hygiene) 

M. H. Brown, Assistant Professor (part time — paid also in Connaught 

Laboratories) $1,000 — $20 980 00 

Lecturers (Sessional — part time): 

G. D. Porter (see also Health Service — Men) $500 — $16.70 453 30 

Dr. Frieda H. Eraser. $500 — $10 (paid also in Connaught 

Laboratories ) 490 00 

P. A. T. Sneath. $500 — $10 (paid also in Connaught Laboratories) 490 00 

Class Assistants ( Sessional ) : 

Miss G. E. Cowan. $1,000 — $20 980 00 

Miss H. C. Plummer. $500 — $10 (paid also in Connaught 

Laboratories) 490 00 

Miss E. A. Anderson. $200 — $4 (paid also in Connaught 

Laboratories ) 1 96 00 

J. S. Kitching 200 00 

C. H. D. Clarke. Fellow ( Sessional ) 800 00 

Miss M. E. Collins. Laboratory Assistant 720 00 

Miss E. Barr. Secretarial Assistant. $1,000 — $20 980 GO 



800 


00 


800 


00 


400 


00 


450 


00 


1.272 


50 


1.565 


00 


1.565 


00 


980 


00 


980 


00 


980 00 


980 


00 


312 


50 


420 00 




coo OCO oc 






$5,795 


00 


4.365 00 


) 2.682 


50 


1.662 


50 


1.467 


50 


450 


00 


1.467 


50 


600 


00 


400 


00 


400 00 


250 00 


1.223 


75 


1.223 


75 


1.760 00 


1.950 00 


1.370 00 


1.175 00 


882 


00 




— $29,124 50 



$12,624 30 



226 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Medicine and Clinical Medicine 

Duncan Graham, Professor, $10,000 — $310 $9,690 00 

Assistant Professors: 

R. F. Farquharson (a $3,000, of which $1,000 charged to Thera- 
peutics (paid also $10 for Extension Work) $2,000 — $45 1,955 00 

W. F. McPhedran 500 00 

Associates: 

W. R. Campbell, $2,500 — $60 2,440 00 

A. G. McPhedran (half time — paid also $200 in Health Service) . . 500 00 

Senior Demonstrators (Sessional): 

W. P. Warner. $1,000 — $20 980 00 

G. W. Lougheed, also in Clinical Microscopy 500 00 

Trevor Owen, Medicine (paid also $150 in School of Nursing) .... 500 00 

Jqnior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

R. A. Cleghorn, $2,500 — $60 2,440 00 

J. A. Dauphinee (paid also $10 for Extension Work) $2,500 — $60 2,440 00 

H. E. Rykert (paid also $5 for Post Graduate Course) $2,500 — $60 2,440 00 

E. J. Maltby, $2,000 — $45 1,955 00 

H. H. Hyland (paid also $5 for Post Graduate Course) $1,500— $32.50 1.467 50 

N. M. Wrong, $1,000 — $20 980 00 

FeUows (Sessional) : 

G. A. McVicar, $1,500 — $32.50 1.467 50 

A. E. Parks. $1,000 — $20 980 00 

Harris Gray, Junior Demonstrator, Clinical Microscopy (Sessional) 250 00 

Research Assistants: 

H. W. WakefV;ld, $1,400 — $30 1.370 00 

Miss M. I. Hanna, $1,380 — $29.50 1,350 50 

Miss N. R. Hearn. Technician, Applied Physiology. $1320 — $28 1,292 00 

Miss S. H. Glutton, Secretarial Assistant, $1,440 — $31 1,409 00 

Assistant Professors: 

F. A. Clarkson (paid also $360 in Dentistry) 300 00 

Goldwin Rowland (paid also $30 for Extension Work and $5 for 

Post Graduate Course ) 300 00 

J. D. Loudon 300 00 

J. A. Oille ( paid also $20 in Health Ssrvice ) 300 00 

E. J. Trow (in charge of Dermatology ) 300 00 

Associates: 

R. G. Armour (paid also $30 for Extension Work and $10 in Health 

Service) 250 00 

H. K. Detweiler 250 00 

J. H. Elliott (paid also $686 as Professor of History of Medicine; 
$39.20 in School of Nursing; $30 for Extension Work; $10 for 

Post Graduate Course, and $26.25 from University Press) $250— $5 245 00 

A. A. Fletcher (paid also $20 for Extension Work and $5 for Post 

Graduate Course) 250 00 

H. C. Parsons (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 250 00 

F. W. Rolph 250 00 

Senior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

Gordon Bates (paid also $20 in School of Nursing) 200 00 

G. F. Boyer (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 200 00 

A. H. W. Caulfeild (paid also in Connaught Laboratories and $10 

in Health Service) $200 — $4 ]% 00 

E. E. Cleaver 200 00 

H. A. Dixon (paid also $30 for Post Graduate Course) 200 00 

B. Hannah (paid also $5 for Post Graduate Course and $190 in 

School of Nursing) 200 00 

J. Hepburn ( paid also $10 for Extension Work ) 200 00 

A. J. McKenzie 200 00 

Harris McPhedran 200 00 

W. E. Ogden 200 00 

Junior Demonstrators (Sessional): 

E. F. Brooks 150 00 

E. A. Broughton 150 00 

J. G. Falconer (paid also $200 in School of Nursing and $50 for 

Extension Work ) 150 00 

A. R. Hagerman 150 00 

L. M. Murray 150 00 

D'Arcy Prendergast 150 00 

Department of Paediatrics: 

Alan Brown, Professor (paid also $50 for Post Graduate Course and 

$160 in School of Nursing) 350 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



227 



F. F. Tisdall. Associate (paid also $40 for Extension Work and $30 

for Post Graduate Course » $2,000 — $45 1.955 00 

Dr. Gladys L. Boyd. Senior Demonstrator (half time — paid also $40 

for Post Graduate Course ) 500 00 

Junior Demonstrators (Sessional): 

T. G. H. Drake (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 

$2,000 — $45 1.955 00 

Dr. Pearl Summerfeldt (paid also $35 for Post Graduate 

Course ) 500 00 

K. S. Bernhardt. Research Assistant (Sessional — see also 

Psychology) $200 — $4 1% 00 

Miss R. M. Herbert Technician, Chemistry 200 00 

.Miss Mary L. Cassidy, Secretarial Assistant (paid also $10 for Post 

Graduate Course) 500 00 

-Associates: 

A. W. Canfield (paid also $45 for Post Graduate Course) 250 00 

E. A. Morgan (paid also $50 for Post Graduate Course) 250 00 

G. R. Pirie (paid also $50 for Post Graduate Course) 250 00 

Senior Demonstrators (Sessional): 

A. P. Hart ( paid also $40 for Post Graduate Course) 200 00 

G. E. Smith (paid also $25 for Post Graduate Course) 200 00 

Junior Demonstrators (Sessional): 

W. W. Barraclough (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 150 00 

Nelles Silverthorne (paid also $25 for Post Graduate Course) .. 150 00 

C. E. Snelling (paid also $30 for Post Graduate Course) 150 00 

J. R. Ross (paid also $40 for Post Graduate Course) 100 00 

Surgery and Clinical Surgery 

W. E. Gallie. Professor. $10,000— $310 $9,690 00 

Fellows (full time) : 

E. H. Botterell. $1,500 — $32.50 1.467 50 

W. K. Welsh (paid also $98 in School of Nursing) $1.500 — $33.. 1.467 00 

Fellows (part time) : 

W. S. Keith (paid also $30 for Post Graduate Course and $5 in 

School of Nursing) $1.300 — $27.50 1.272 50 

A. W. Farmer (paid also $5 for Post Graduate Course) $1,000 — $20 980 00 

S. D. Gordon (paid also $35 for Post Graduate Course) $1.000 — $20 980 00 

R. M. Janes 700 00 

D. R. Mitchell 600 00 

Fellows ( Resident — Sessional ) : 

A. R. Bazin 400 00 

J. W. Brennan 400 00 

H. F. Mowat 400 00 

Assistant Fellows (Resident — Sessional): 

C. Aberhart 300 00 

G. Kent Harrison 300 00 

F. Burns Plewes 300 00 

Stuart A. Thomson 300 00 

F. R. Wilkinson 300 00 

H. R. Ziegler 300 00 

Miss T. W. MacLaren. Secretary. $1,320 — $28 1 .292 00 

G. F. Pringle. Laboratory Technician. $1,080 — $22 1.058 00 

Assistant Professors: 

R. R. Graham 300 00 

W. W. Jones 300 00 

Robin Pearse 300 00 

D. E. Robertson (paid also $25 for Post Graduate Course; $20 in 

School of Nursing, and $10 in Health Service) 300 00 

N. S. Shenstone 300 00 

G. E. Wilson ( paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 300 00 

E. S. Ryerson (see also Administration) 

Associates: 

T. A. J. Duff 250 00 

R. E. Gaby 250 00 

R. I. Harris (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 250 00 

A. B. LeMesurier (paid also $25 for Post Graduate Course) 250 00 

K. G. McKenzie (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course and $20 

for Extension Work ) 250 00 

Wallace A. Scott 250 00 

H. V . Wookcy 250 00 



$50,653 50 



228 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



200 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


$29,807 00 



Senior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

G. S. Foulds 

J. C. McClelland 

R. J. A. McComb 

J. L. McDonald (paid also $40 for Extension Work and $25 for Post 
Graduate Course) 

C. B. Parker 

T. A. Robinson (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 

James W. Ross 

R. H. Thomas (paid also $25 for Post Graduate Course) 

J. H. Wood 

Junior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

H. G. Armstrong (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 

W. G. Carscadden (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 

J. H. Couch (paid also $5 for Post Graduate Course) 

Charles Crompton 

James T. Danis (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 

R. C. Laird (paid also $30 in Anatomy) 

F. I. Lewis ( paid also $40 for Extension Work and $35 for Post 

Graduate Course) 

J. A. MacFarlane (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 

D. W. G. Murray (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 

D. W. Pratt (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 

E. E. Shouldice 

R. M. Wansbrough (paid also $5 for Post Graduate Course) 

C. H. Watson 



Obstetrics and Gynaecology 

William A. Scott, Professor, $1,000 — $20 $980 00 

Fellows (full time) : 

D. Nelson Henderson, $1,500 — $32.50 

John Mann, $1,500 — $32.50 

Fellows (half time! : 

J. C. Goodwin 

J. R. McArthur 

Miss M. Bonham, Laboratory Technician, $1,100 — $22.50 

Miss Hilda Carson, Secretary, $900 — $18 

F. W. Marlow, Associate Professor 

Assistant Professors: 

N. D. Frawley 

H. B. Van \^Vck (paid also $100 in School of Nursing and $5 for 
Post Graduate Course ) 

R. W. Wesley 

J. A. Kinnear, Associate 

Senior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

W. G. Cosbie 

W. W. Lailey 

D. M. Low 

S. J. N. Magwood (paid also $100 in Health Service) 

Junior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

Lionel T. Armstrong 

W. A. Dafoe 

H. W. Johnston 

Kent Manning 

W. T. Noonan 

Frank J. O'Leary 

G. Leslie Watt 

Ophthnlnwlogy 

W. H. Lowry, Professor $700 00 

Associates: 

F. A. Aylesworth 200 00 

C. E. Hill 200 00 

Mortimer Lyon 200 00 

W. W. Wright (paid also $5 for Post Graduate Course) 200 00 

A. E. MacDnnald (part time) $1,200 — $25 1,175 00 

J. F. A. Johnston, Assistant (Sessional — paid also $147 in Pharma- 
cology) $800 — $16 784 00 



1,467 


50 


1,467 


50 


500 00 


500 00 


1,077 


50 


882 


00 


350 


00 


300 


00 


300 


00 


300 00 


250 


00 


200 


00 


200 


00 


200 00 


200 00 


150 00 


150 


00 


150 00 


150 


00 


150 


00 


150 


00 


150 00 




— $10,224 50 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



229 



Junior Demonstrators (Sessional): 

H. M. Macrae 

A. L. Morgan 

Miss Mary Gray, Secretarial Assistant @ $%0, of which half charged to 
Oto-Laryngology ) $480 — $9.60 

Oto-Laryngology 

Perry Goldsmith, Professor 

G. M. Biggs, Associate Professor 

A. A. Campbell, Associate 

Senior Demonstrators (Sessional): 

Howard H. Burnham 

John C. Calhoun 

Cecil A. Rae 

D. E. S. Wishart (paid also $10 for Post Graduate Course) 

Junior Demonstrators (Sessional): 

Howard McCart 

Gregor McGregor 

G. C. Snell 

J. Grant Strachan 

Joseph A. Sullivan 

M. B. Wh>te 

W. B. Stark (without salary) 

P. E. Ireland (full time) $1,750 — $38.75 

A. M. McLeod (full time ) 

Miss Mary Gray, Technician (see also Ophthalmology) $480 — $9.60 

Therapeutics 

R. F. Farquharson, Assistant Professor (see also Dept. of Medicine) 

$1,000 — $30 

H. J. Shields, Associate in charge of Anaesthesia 

W. J. Gardiner, Associate in charge of Physical Therapy (paid also $50 

for Post Graduate Course, and $500 for Extension Work) 

C. E. Cooper Cole, Senior Demonstrator, Therapeutics (Sessional) 

Junior Demonstrators in Anaesthesia (Sessional): 

^'' . Easson Brown (paid also $10 in School of Nursing) 

H. S. Douglas 

Ralph Hargrave 

C H. Robson (paid also $5 for Post Graduate Course) 

Assistants, Therapeutics (Sessional) : 

F. S. Brien 

R. C. Dickson 

John F. McCreary 

Assistants, Anaesthesia (Sessional — without salary): 

G. R. Balfour 

S. M. Campbell 

J. Chassels 

N. S. Clark 

S. J. Evelyn 

A. R. Wilkins 

J. C. Sinclair, Research Fellow (Sessional) 



200 00 


200 00 


470 40 


$700 00 


3.50 


00 


250 00 


200 


00 


200 


00 


200 


00 


200 


00 


150 00 


150 


00 


150 00 


150 


00 


150 


00 


150 00 


1,711 


25 


750 00 


470 


40 



Psychiatry 

C. B. Farrar, Professor (paid cilso $100 in Health Service and $5 for Post 

Graduate Course) $5.000 — $155 

E. P. Lewis, Assistant Professor, $1,900 — $42.50 

Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

C. H. McCuaig 

G. W. Anderson ( paid also $100 in Psychology) 

B. T. McGhie 

C. Stogdill (paid also $100 in School of Nursing) 

J. A. Hannah, Fellow, Neuropathology, $1,000 — $20 

A. J. Kilgour, Fellow ( Sessional ) I without 

Miss A. F. .\bbott. Secretarial Assistant f salary 



Less paid by Canadian National Committee for Mental Hygiene.. 



$970 00 
250 00 


250 00 
200 00 


150 00 
150 00 
1.50 00 
150 00 


50 00 
50 00 
50 00 



800 00 



$4,845 


00 


1,857 


50 


650 


00 


150 


00 


150 00 


1.50 


00 


980 


00 


$8,782 .50 


3,045 00 



$4,329 40 



$5,931 65 



$3,220 00 



$5,737 50 



230 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Medical Jurisprudence 
M. M. Crawford, Associate $250 00 

Radiology 

G. E. Richards. Professor 

A. C. Singleton. Associate , 

A. H. Rolph, Senior Demonstrator ( Sessional — paid also $5 for Post 

Graduate Course) 

M. R. Hall. Assistant Demonstrator (Sessional) 

A. D. Irvine, Assistant (part time — Sessional) 

Research Professor 
Sir Frederick Banting (paid $5,000 in Special Research) 



1250 00 




200 00 




200 


00 




100 


00 




500 


00 


$1,250 00 














Special Lectures 

Professor J. H. Elliott. History of Medicine (see also Department of 

.Medicine ) $700 — $14 '. $686 00 

E. J. Pratt. English (paid also $360 in Faculty of Dentistry; $175 for 

Extension Work, and $30 in Ontario College of Education ) 400 00 

A. D. A. Mason, Dentistry (see also Faculty of Dentistry) $100 — $3.15 96 85 

Special Lecturers (Sessional — without salary): 
Course in Science and Civilization : 

A. F. Coventry ( paid in Biology ) 

H. Wasteneys (paid in Bio-Chemistry) 

J. G. Falconer. Life Insurance 

G. S. Young, Medical Ethics and Economics 



Less charged to: 

Rockefeller Fund $53,000 00 

Eaton Endowment 25.278 50 



$1,182 85 
$319,327 23 



$78,278 50 



53a. Post Graduate Courses 
Honoraria to Instructors: 
Paediatrics ($700) : 

W. W. Barraclough 

G. F. Boyer 

A. W. Canfield 

H. A. Dixon 

J. H. Elliott 

A. W. Farmer 

B. Hannah 

Miss Jean Hutt 

A. B. LeMesurier 

E. A. Morgan 

Harold Parsons 

D. E. Robertson 

A. H. Rolph 

Dr. Pearl Summerfeldt 

N. SOverthorne 

F. F. Tisdall 

C. B. Weld 

W. W. Wright 

Dr. Gladys L. Boyd 

Alan Brown 

Miss M'arv L. Cassidy 

T. G. H. Drake 

I. H. Erb 

A . P. Hart 

G. P. Hamblin 

^ . S. Keith 

J. L. McDonald 

C. D. Parfitt 



$241,048 73 


$20 00 


20 00 


45 00 


30 00 


10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


50 00 


20 00 


5 00 


5 00 


35 00 


25 00 


30 00 


5 00 


5 00 


40 00 


50 00 


10 00 


20 00 


10 00 


40 00 


20 00 


5 00 


5 00 


10 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 231 

G. R. Pirie 

C. H. Robson 

John R. Ross 

G. E. Smith 

C. E. Snelling 

R. M. Wansbrough 

D. E. Wishart 

Physiotherapy (|100» : 

J. H. Couch 

A. A. Fletcher 

Goldwin Howland 

W. S. Keith 

H. E. Rvkert 

H. B. Van Wyck 

C. B. Farrar 

W. J. Gardiner 

H. H. Hyland 

E. S. Ryerson 

R. H. Thomas 

Surgery (|370» : 

H. G. Armstrong 

J. T. Danis 

R. I. Harris 

A. B. LeMesurier 

J. L. McDonald 

K. G. McKenzie 

D. W. Pratt 

T. A. Robinson 

G. E. Wilson 

W. G. Carscadden 

S. D. Gordon 

W. S. Keith 

F. I. Lewis 

J. A. MacFarlane 

D. G. Murray 

D. E. Robertson 

R. H. Thomas 

W. E. Gallic, sundry expenses in connection with course in Surgery: 

Surgical supplies. $227.72; meals to class, $83.77; models, $25: 
sundries, $40.30 

54. Anatomy 
Anatomical material ($2,987.77) : 

E. E. Bolton 

Canada Packers , 

Canadian Industrial Alcohol Co 

E. Cullen 

T. Eaton Co 

General Biological Supply House 

Eric Glaesner 

C. Hunt 

Imperial Oil Ltd 

Ingram & Bell 

LeMasurier Bros 

H. E. LeMasurier 

Lever Bros 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

F. W. Matthews Co 

H. R. Ranks 

Riverdale Lumber Co 

Robt. Simpson Co 

Wm. Speers 

Prof. J. C. Boileau Grant, models 

Superintendent's Dept., lalxtur, $49.28; material. $66.06 

General supplies ($3,083,871 : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 

American Medical Association, reprints 

Art Metropole, parts for microscope, drawing paper, etc 

Associated Screen News Ltd., camera, projector, etc 

Wm. Bartlett & Son. shades and rollers 

Burke Electric & X-Ray Co.. re-wiring X-Ray unit, etc 



50 00 


5 00 


40 00 


25 00 


30 00 


5 00 


10 00 


5 00 


5 (KJ 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


50 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


20 00 


20 00 


20 00 


20 00 


20 00 


20 00 


20 00 


20 00 


20 00 


20 00 


35 00 


20 00 


35 00 


20 00 


20 00 


20 00 


20 00 


'. 376 79 


«! c;^/; 70 




$450 00 


20 82 


194 49 


58 50 


25 27 


30 82 


86 00 


132 00 


24 03 


409 99 


59 00 


7 50 


148 80 


21 29 


952 86 


30 00 


75 .56 


15 75 


30 00 


99 75 


115 34 


$151 03 


12 16 


22 62 


342 .50 


19 50 


39 50 



232 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Canadian Medical Association, reprints 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd., laboratory coats 

Coulter Copper & Brass Ltd., turn tables 

Eastman Kodak Stores, mounting press, S83.30; X-Ray films, repairs 

to camera, etc.. S80.45 

T. Eaton Co., clamps, brushes, etc 

Gevaert Co. of America Inc.. films, plates, etc 

Gordon. Mackay & Co.. towels 

J. F. Hartz Co.. skin pencils, etc 

P. Hermann. Rickenback & Sohn. sliding calipers 

Ingram & Bell, syringes, forceps, gloves, etc 

Kelley Feed & Seed Co.. feed 

Le Masurier Bros., display tables, museum case, etc 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, acetone, etc 

Model Incubators Ltd.. incubator 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. transfer cases, etc 

Mrs. J. Pattie. calculating and checking 

Postage 

Riverdale Lumber Co.. lumber 

Robbins & Townsend. rebuilt typewTiter, 149.50; inspection. $14.40. . 

Silverwood Milk Products, milk powder 

Superior Electric Supply Co.. lamp 

Toronto Hydro-Electric System 

University Library-, books replaced 

Victor X-Ray Corporation. X-Ray tube, etc 

Wistar Institute of Anatomy & Biology, reprints, etc 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (18 1 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Medical supplies, $15.97; hardware. $45.42; sundries. $48.32.. 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, etc.. $17.15; labour. $155.60: 

material, $220.41 



10 


50 


89 


10 


222 08 


163 


75 


18 


76 


99 66 


49 


53 


30 


50 


22 


78 


85 


99 


88 


70 


368 


75 


38 


33 


14 44 


23 


43 


24 


52 


30 00 


40 


79 


63 


90 


11 


30 


16 22 


13 64 


17 


84 


94 73 


20 


49 


264 45 


69 


51 


105 


1.71 


393 


16 


$6,071 64 


'. 676 


45 



Less credits: Sale of microscopes. $520; sale of material. $120.70 
laboratory- deposits, $35.75 

55. Pathology and Bacteriology 

Supplies and apparatus ($4,911.24) : 

Adams Furniture Co.. chair $16 82 

John Allen, meat 70 79 

American Journal of Cancer, reprints. . 33 77 

American Medical Association, reprints, etc 124 35 

\rt Metropole. microtomes, knives, microscope parts, etc 336 16 

W. & T. Avery Ltd.. scale. $89.50 ; repairs, $11.50 101 00 

British Drug Houses, chemicals 9 66 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. truck 55 42 

Canadian Medical Association, reprints 14 84 

Walter A. Carveth & Co.. microscope lamps, etc 52 00 

Central Scientific Co.. scales, etc 26 37 

Connaught Laboratories, drugs and serum 11 30 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd.. laboratory^ coats 11 62 

Diamond Cleanser Soaps Ltd.. soap 22 26 

Eastman Kodak Stores, chemicals, films, paper, etc 158 45 

T. Eaton Co., crocks, thread, utensils, etc 55 35 

Gevaert Co. of America. Inc.. lantern plates, etc 68 35 

Giles. Rice & Peters, service on frigidaire 10 50 

Grand & Toy. chair cushion, holders, etc 10 50 

Guaranteed Exterminating Company 40 00 

Harper Bros., reprints 48 36 

J. F. Hartz Co.. chemicals, glassware, etc 430 74 

Ingram & Bell, filter paper, slides, culture tubes, etc 585 13 

Kilgour's Ltd.. wrapping paper 34 47 

Lea & Ferbiger. reprints 29 26 

Liquid Carbonic Canadian Corporation, gas 75 00 

Lockhart's Camera Exchange, shutter, meter and case 34 75 

Lockport Cotton Batting Co.. cotton 33 47 

Medical Research Dept.. animals and food supplies 238 70 

Murray Printing Ck).. reprints 23 00 

Postage 79 50 



$5,395 19 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



233 



Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection, etc 

Stephens Sales Ltd., mimeographing note books, $422; ink, $1 

Stevens Companies, non-absorbent cotton and slides 

Toronto General Hospital, laundry 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under §10 (23) 

Caretaker's overtime services, H. Vickery 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Stationery, $17.61;' hardware, $23.99; food supplies, $14.83; 
sundries, $62.29 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $23.09; labour, $404.65; material, 

$391.26 

Museum supplies ($822.22) : 

Art Metropole, museum jars 

J. F. Hartz Co., glassware and chemicals 

Ingram & Bell, electric oven, $52.50; trays, $16.92 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. filing shelves 

Robt. Simpson Co.. chair and smocks 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under SIO (2) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $39.36; material, $8.88 

Clerical assistance: 

Miss M. Wightman, 2 mos 

Neuropathology: 

Art Metropole, microscope and case, $192.37; objectives, cover slips. 
etc., $192.06 

Walter A. Carveth & Co., Leitz lamp, etc 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd., laboratory coats 

Dictaphone Sales Corporation, inspection 

Dictating Machine Supply Co., cylinders 

Eastman Kodak Stores, holders and filters 

Grand & Toy. steel file, etc 

J. F. Hartz Co.. filter paper, chemicals, etc 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals, etc 

Liquid Carbonic Canadian Corporation 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., filing cabinets 

Postage 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 

Toronto General Hospital, laundry 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (4) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $29.53; material. $42.44 



Less credits: Sale of material, 827.45; laboratory deposits, $280.72. . 

56. Pathological Chemistry 
Supplies and apparatus: 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 

H. Allnutt & Son, filters 

Art Metropole, microscope and parts 

British Drug Houses, drugs, etc 

Canadian Industries Ltd., acids 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, time clocks, glassware, chemicals, etc, 
Central Scientific Co.. centrifuge, $279.94; glassware, tubing, etc. 

$101.01 

R. H. Chappell. glassblowing 

Coming Glass Works, centrifuge tubes 

Dewey & Almy Chemical Co.. chemicals 

T. Eaton Co., towels, cheesecloth, etc 

Grand & Toy, mapping pens, ink, etc 

Guaranteed Exterminating Co 

Ingram & Bell, batting, chemicals, etc 

Instruments Ltd., slide rule 

Medical Research Dept., animals and food supplies 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., cabinets 

Pfanstiehl Chemical Co.. chemicals 

Quality Stationers Ltd.. stencils, ink, etc 

Roneo Co. of Canada, stencils, ink, etc 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 19) 



45 80 
423 00 

70 50 
246 64 
254 72 

75 47 

15 50 



118 72 

819 00 

262 31 
188 52 

69 42 
174 01 

48 86 

24 07 
6 79 

48 24 

140 00 



364 43 


26 00 


21 


09 


13 


00 


15 


00 


12 


65 


44 80 


40 


46 


26 46 


,34 80 


109 67 


14 00 


10 


20 


44 87 


39 33 


13 


92 


71 


97 


$6,796 11 


308 


17 


$100 81 


48 


13 


185 02 


90 


33 


67 


49 


228 


57 


380 95 


22 


30 


104 


23 


45 00 


30 


15 


10 


95 


30 00 


25 71 


21 


25 


62 


10 


137 


54 


35 


27 


10 00 


31 


24 


151 


13 


102 


38 



$6,487 94 



234 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Sundry disbursements by department: 

Stationery and postage. $23.13; food supplies, $13.12; sundries, 

$13.75 ; 50 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, etc.. $12.37; labour, $29.04; 

material. $34.60 • 76 01 

$2,046 56 
Less credits: Sale of instruction sheets. S66; laboratory deposits. 

$38.17 104 17 

57. Pharmacy and Pharmacology 

Supplies ($1,755.73) : 

Abbott Laboratories, chemicals $10 10 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. bench saw. etc 116 60 

Barchard & Co.. sawdust 13 37 

Allan Brock, animals 148 30 

Burroughs- ellc^me Ltd.. drugs 52 60 

Canadian Kodak Co. chemicals, etc 62 29 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals and glassware 202 86 

Chemical Publications Co. of New York, books 10 50 

T. Eaton Co.. glassw are. etc 11 07 

Eimer & Amend, chloralose 40 76 

J. A. Fontaine, frogs 70 00 

0. W. Herzberg. chemicals 12 00 

F. W. Humphrey Co.. fish 25 60 

Ingram & Bell, needles, gauze, chemicals, etc 27 30 

Johnson-Matthey & Co.. electrode 35 00 

Langley. Harris & Co.. dog biscuits, etc 47 00 

National Drug & Chemical Co.. chemicals, etc 50 63 

Ontario Rubber Co.. tubing 38 91 

Queen City Dental Mfg. Co.. oxygen, etc 12 72 

Ralston Purina Co.. dog food 62 50 

Richards Glass Co.. glassware 15 12 

Scientific Glass Apparatus Co., condenser, flasks and thermometers.. 55 12 

Taber Laundry \^'orks 47 75 

Taylor Instrument Co.. sphymomanometer parts 15 75 

Toronto Elevators Ltd.. feed 19 50 

Waverley Press Inc.. reprints 38 52 

Wholesale Radio Co.. tubes, etc 36 33 

University Press, printing and stationery 102 87 

Accounts' under $10 (18 ) 105 45 

Sundry disbursements bv department: 

Hardware. $23.82: food supplies. $7.87: sundries. $15.53 47 22 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, etc., $95.04; labour. $20.08; material, 

$106.87 221 99 

Apparatus ($371.28) : 

Centra] Scientific Co.. still and electric furnace 91 87 

General Radio Co.. transformers, volume control, etc 97 00 

Mid-Vi est Radio Mart, batteries, etc 98 14 

Payette & Co.. accumulators 53 00 

Wholesale Radio -Service Co.. radio parts 31 27 

$2,127 01 

Less credits: Material returned 6 01 



58. Bio-Chemistry (including Zymologv ) 

Supplies and apparatus ($4,844.82) : 

Acme Farmers" Dairy , milk $77 10 

Aikenhead Hardw-are Ltd., hardware 23 07 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry- 44 17 

J. Blood, meat, vegetables, etc 267 88 

Borden Co.. mUk powder 88 20 

British Drug Houses, chemicals 196 43 

Cambridge University Press, reprints 67 25 

Canada Packers Ltd.. blood, glands, etc 37 66 

Canadian General Electric Co.. heating units 11 82 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. acids 148 56 

Canadian Kodak Co.. chemicals 43 63 

Canadian Laborator)' Supplies, chemicals, glassware, etc 670 18 



$1,942 39 



$2,121 GO 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 235 

Canadian Liquid Air Co., gas, rental of cylinders, etc 68 93 

Central Scientific Co.. chemicals, glassware, etc 220 41 

R. H. Chappell, glassblowing 62 60 

G. C. Charlton, dogs 17 50 

Corbett-Cowlev Ltd., laboratory coats 89 24 

E. Cullen, dogs 47 50 

Dominion Glass Co., bottles 10 49 

T. Eaton Co., utensils, cotton batting, etc 46 08 

J. F. Hartz Co.. needles, catgut, etc 72 20 

0. W. Herzberg. chemicals 117 28 

Houghton's Silverware & Plating Ltd.. tubes, etc 24 00 

Johnson-Matthey & Co.. platinum wire and gauge 12 32 

Journal of Biological Chemistr>". subscriptions and reprints 49 75 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, chemicals 34 16 

Mead. Johnson & Co., cod liver oil 40 43 

Merck & Co.. acetone and chemicals 471 21 

National Drug & Chemical Co., leeches and chemicals 42 20 

Photographic Service, slides and plates 12 10 

Quintc Milk Products, casein 44 85 

Rennie"s Seeds, castor oil beans 22 95 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 23 00 

St. Lawrence Starch Co.. corn starch 45 90 

Dr. L A. Schoeller. chemical analyses 46 39 

Scientific Glassblowing Co., funnels 10 55 

Shawinigan Chemicals Ltd., alcohol 30 86 

Toronto Elevators Ltd.. feed . 49 40 

S. S. White Co.. gas 12 01 

Wilson Scientific Co.. glassware 409 32 

University Press, printing and stationery 132 67 

Accounts under SIO (18 ) 83 05 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Collecting expenses. $38.05; food supplies, $9.34; postage, 

S38.47; telegrams, etc., SI 1.80; sundries, $37.94 135 60 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, etc., $44.10; labour. $134.79; 

material. S505.03 683 92 

Refrigeration Unit (SI. 197.05) : 

J. Coulter Co.. refrigeration door 52 90 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co., mas'.ic flooring 7 20 

Kelvinator of Canada Ltd.. refrigerator installed, $624; new parts, 

etc., .S49.47 673 47 

Mundel Cork & Insulating Ltd., insulating room 105 00 

Routerv- Bros., plastering .58 35 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. S169.04; material. S131.09 300 13 

$6,041 87 
Less credits: Banting Research Foundation, S300; sale of laboratory 

coats, etc.. S49.61 ; laboratory- deposits, $427.44 777 05 



59. Physiology 
Supplies: 

Acme Farmers' Dairy, milk $.54 23 

Barchard & Co.. sawdust 25 30 

British Drug Houses, casein, chloride, etc 216 78 

Canada Packers Ltd.. glands, blood, etc 87 67 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., hardware 14€ 21 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. acids 81 49 

Canadian Laboratory- Supplies, chemicals, glassware, etc 123 14 

Canadian Liquid Air Co., gas and rental of cylinders 60 67 

Central Scientific Co.. chemicals, glassware, etc 122 97 

R. H. Chappell, glassblowing 63 95 

Stephen Clare, diatron tube relay .35 00 

Connaught Laboratories, chemicals, glands, etc 17 83 

Joseph Cooper, meat 113 19 

E. Cullen. animals 89 50 

Eastman Kodak .Stores, chemicals, etc 25 12 

T. Eaton Co.. crocks, gauze, provisions, etc 433 29 

Giles, Rice & Peters, brushes and service on frigidaire 14 78 

Ingram & Bell, instruments, drugs, gauze, etc 202 89 

Langley, Harris & Co.. dog biscuits 162 00 

H. K. Lewis & Co., reprints 26 94 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, ether and chemicals 106 64 



$5,264 82 



236 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Marine Biological Laboratory', micro-chemical apparatus 

Medicine Hat Pottery Co., dishes 

Pfansteihl Chemical Co., chemicals, etc 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 

Postage 

Queen City Brass Foundry, castings 

Rainbow Lantern Slide Co.. slides 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection, etc 

F. J. Sperapani. translation from Italian 

Toronto Elevators Ltd.. feed 

H. F. Whittaker, animals 

W istar Institute of Anatomy & Biology, reprints 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (34) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Laundry. $313.06; postage. $35.07; telegrams, etc., $5.50; hard- 
ware and sundries. $56.37 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, etc., $106.72; labour, $61.55; 
material, $256.26 

Less credits: Charged to School of Nursing, $200; containers 
returned, $38.50; laboratory deposits. $42.53 

60. Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 

.Supplies and apparatus ($1,808.70) : 

Canadian Laboratory' Supplies, glassware, etc 

Central Scientific Co., glassware 

Connaught Laboratories, animals, chemicals, vaccines, etc 

Gray Coach Lines, hire of coaches to Connaught Laboratories Farms 

Ingram & Bell, microscope. $75; chemicals, $5.40 

Mimeograph Co.. stencils, paper, etc 

Office Specially Mfg. Co.. filing cabinets, etc 

Ontario Laundry Co 

Postage 

Harry R. Sparks, report books 

Stephens Sales Ltd.. stencils 

Underwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd.. typewriter , 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (8) 

Sundry disbursements by department , 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $20.38; material, $11.41 

Qeaner, Mrs. Ada Hall. 159% days Co $2.50 

61. MIedicine 
Supplies and chemicals ($1,013.95) : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 

American Medical Association 

British Drug Houses, chemicals 

Burlington Free Press, reprints 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals 

Canadian Medical Association 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd.. laboratory coats 

T. E^ton Co., uniforms, salmon, etc 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals, etc 

Medical Research Dept., animals 

C. V. Mosby Co.. reprints 

C. F. Palmer Ltd.. paper 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 

Postage 

Ralston Purina Co.. dog feed 

Toronto General Hospital, lantern slides, etc 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $l0 ( 17 ) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Food supplies. $9.30; stationery, $2.70; sundries, $8.00.... 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, etc., $12.06; material, $59.27... 
Apparatus ($307.50) : 

Art Metropole. microscope parts, etc 



87 


08 


18 72 


60 49 


45 09 


27 


00 


27 


22 


11 


20 


26 


10 


20 00 


39 40 


11 


50 


27 


13 


182 66 


164 


32 


410 00 


424 53 



,786 03 
281 03 



$27 44 


20 09 


982 06 


i 60 00 


80 40 


44 28 


27 58 


21 


05 


11 


00 


119 52 


20 


25 


141 


75 


185 


28 


26 


21 


10 00 


31 


79 


398 


75 


$39 42 


30 


53 


43 


36 


12 


21 


yo 


i\} 


75 


35 


12 


38 


72 


00 


175 


76 


42 


00 


44 46 


15 


13 


16 


80 


57 


16 


16 


05 


28 


24 


78 


96 


66 


11 


20 00 


71 


33 



$3,505 00 



$2,207 45 



I 






86 73 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 237 

Allan Brock, monometer 25 00 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware, etc 13 70 

Central Scientific Co.. glassware, etc 24 68 

Harvard Apparatus Co.. holder 10 78 

Johnson. ^Iatthey Co.. platinum dishes 36 00 

Scientific Glass Apparatus Co., burettes 18 27 

Arthur H. Thomas Co., glassware, clamps, etc 52 37 

Accounts under $10 (61 33 43 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 6 54 

Books and periodicals (S.522.261 : 

Thos. Nelson & Sons, renewal pages 15 15 

University Press, printing and stationery 496 70 

Accounts under $10 (4) 10 41 

Laboratory cleaning: 

Miss E. Bailey. 28 weeks. 2 days 336 00 

Paediatrics: 

Supplies and chemicals ($2,146.55) : 

American Medical Association, reprints $24 85 

Borden Co.. trucream 28 32 

British Drug Houses, chemicals 166 01 

Burbank Corporation, alfalfa powder 11 27 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. chemicals 30 62 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware and chemicals 449 83 

Canadian Medical Association, reprints 41 33 

L. J. Cartwright. slides 108 60 

E. Cullen. animals 34 60 

Evangelical Press, reprints 13 41 

Higgins & Burke Ltd.. sugar 18 10 

Hospital for Sick Children. X-Rays and radiographs 410 84 

Ingram & Bell, drugs and tubing 14 76 

Mead. Johnson & Co.. yeast powder 63 70 

C. V. Mosby Co.. reprints 58 13 

Jas. Nathan & Co., yeast 33 38 

Postage 51 08 

Pure Gold Mfg. Co.. Hour 40 00 

Quinte Milk Products, casein 217 50 

St. Lawrence Starch Co.. corn starch 36 88 

E. R. Squibb & Sons, powder 10 78 

Underwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd., trays, etc 10 50 

University Press, printing and stationery 54 33 

Accounts' under $10 ( 19 ) 76 06 

Sundry disbursements by department : 

Express and postage, $16.59; stationery. $6.75; sundries, 

$16.66 40 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $16.32; labour. 50c; material. 

$84.85 101 67 

Apparatus ($468.35) : 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals, glassware, and repairs 

to insulator, etc 282 73 

Ditto of Canada Ltd.. duplicating machine 49 50 

Ingram & Bell, test tubes 57 60 

Richards Glass Co.. glassware 14 44 

Walker Metal Products Ltd., transitefront head 15 00 

Accounts under $10 (4) 23 01 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $19.25; material. $6.82 26 07 

( Charged to Eaton Endowment ) $4,794 61 

62. Surgery 
Supplies and apparatus ($1,081.07) : 

Academy of Medicine, postcards and printing re meetings $13 18 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 13 25 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundn 16 00 

Art Service, material 17 43 

Burke Electric & X-Ray Co.. repairs to fluoroscope. etc 13 35 

C. P. R. Telegraphs 11 46 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd.. laboratory coats 169 89 

W. Cowan, Technical .\ssistant. Medical Research, bonus for extra 

services 50 00 

T. Eaton Co., chemicals, flash lights, etc 20 20 

Grand & Toy, stationery 53 45 



238 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



J. F. Hartz Co.. chemicals, ligatures, spools, etc 

Ingram & Bell, oscillameter 

International Books Ltd.. subscriptions 

Prof. Laurence Ir%'ing. electron tube relay 

Lockhart"s Camera Exchange, films, masks and plates 

McAinsh & Co.. text books and dictionary 

H. McCormick. preparing material for class work 

Medical Research Dept.. animals 

Mimeograph Co.. stencil paper 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 

Postage 

St. Michael's Hospital, surgical supplies 

Toronto General Hospital, lantern slides and surgical supplies 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ' 7 i 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Carfare. $7.85; stationery and telegraphs, $10.62; sundries. $6.53 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight 

Museum of Applied Anatomy ($232.22) : 

Burke Electric & X-Ray Co.. Bexo Lite view box and bulbs 

Lockhart's Camera Exchange, films, meter, plates, etc 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. lantern slide cabinet 

Seemore-Selmore System Ltd.. show cases 

Accounts under $10 ( 2 ) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $1.20; material. $4.59 

63. Obstetrics and Gynaecology 
Supplies and apparatus: 

Central Scientific Co., glassware 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd.. laboratory coats 

General Tvpe\NTiter & Appliance Co.. typewriter 

Ingram & Bell, paraffin and slide boxes 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 

Postage 

Toronto General Hospital, gas bags and X-Ray slides 

W. R. Woodruff, copies of lectures 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 7 ) 

Sundry disbursements by department 

Superintendent's Dept., material 

64. Ophthalmology 
Supplies and apparatus: 

Baird & Tatlock Ltd., glass bottles 

Accounts under $10 ( 3 1 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight 

65. Oto-Laryngolocy 
Supplies and apparatus: 

Doctors' Digest Service, subscription 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Ltd., latex 

Laryngoscope Co., subscription 

Photographic Service, slides 

Toronto General Hospital, X-Ray prints and slides 

University Press, books 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $29.40; material. $7.07 

66. Therapeutics 
Supplies and apparatus: 
British Drug Houses, chemicals 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., cabinet and guides 

Accounts under $10 (2 » 

67. Psychiatry 
(Nothing spent) 

68. Medical Jurisprudence 
(Nothing spent) 



114 27 
25 00 
20 00 
90 00 
70 19 
18 00 
25 00 
65 00 
14 50 
25 18 
25 08 
39 70 

51 41 

52 08 
36 88 

25 00 
5 57 

29 68 
72 69 
93 00 
22 50 
8 56 
5 79 



$26 4S 


15 08 


90 00 


40 13 


19 10 


20 00 


24 36 


49 45 


56 19 


40 30 


6 08 


3 09 



$62 10 

13 87 

1 48 



$12 45 
2 36 
13 11 
71 00 
20 80 
10 00 
36 47 


$33 77 

54 91 

8 27 



$1,313 29 



$390 26 



$77 45 



$166 19 



$96 95 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



239 



69. Radiology 
Supplies and apparatus: 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. filing cases $94 25 

Geo. P. Pilling & Son. models of ventricles 66 57 

Toronto General Hospital. X-Ray supplies 590 00 



$750 82 



70. Art Service 

(a) Salaries: 

Miss .M. T. Wishart. Director. S2.500 — S60 S2.440 00 

\riss D. Foster, Assistant Artist, $1,300 — $27.50 1,272 50 

(b) Expenses: 

Part-time assistance ( $95.20 > : 

Miss Amy Cartwright. 62 hours 18 60 

H. A. James. 10 hours 5 00 

Miss G. Williams, 22 hours 6 60 

Miss Jean Wylie, 130 hours 65 00 

Supplies, etc. ($163.49) : 

Artists" Supply Co., drawing and tracing paper 12 94 

Ingram & Bell, beeswax and glycerine 13 45 

University Press, printing and stationery 24 08 

Accounts' under SIO (8) 36 80 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Stationery and art supplies, $23.18; laundry. $11.82 35 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. excise tax, 15c; labour. $29.74; material. 

$11.33 41 22 

$3,971 19 

Less sundry credits 26 32 



$3,944 87 



71. GENEiJAL Expenses 

Office supplies, stationen,-. printing, etc. (S1.74S.67) : 

Lowe-Martin Co., cards 

R. H. Morris, subscriptions 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. baskets, chair pad and stool 

Photographic Service, lantern service, prints and slides 

Postage 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection 

Simmons & Son. funeral wreaths 

Star Office Specialty Co.. stapler and stap'es 

Stephens Sales Ltd.. memo pad and rollers 

L^nderwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd.. rental and tabulator stop 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (10 ) 

Sundry disbursements by Secretary: 

Carfare and postage. $12.67; telpehone and telegraph. $15.05; 

sundries. S17.28 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $99.86: material. $52.78 

Clerical assistance: 

Mrs. L. Lloyd. 19 hours 

Miss Dudley Martin. 9 weeks (paid also $919.95 from Medical 

Research, Best Fund) 

Miss D. Waugh. 2 weeks (paid also $100 from Medical Research 

Best Fund ) 

Alex. Gray, messenger service. 2 weeks 

Publications. Calendar. Dean's Report. Medical Bulletin and Listei 
Lecture (803.50) : 

Postage 

University Press, printing and stationer) 

Nfaintenance and equipment of Lecture Theatre: 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $72.47; material. $39.65 

Medals ($41.45) : 

Birks-EIlis-Ryrie Ltd., engraving 

John Pinches, medals 

Association of American Colleges: 

Membership fees 



S41 


87 


10 00 


23 


59 


97 


32 


175 


60 


35 


90 


30 


00 


11 


50 


14 50 


18 


30 


734 


13 


49 07 


'. 45 


00 


152 


64 


14 


25 


225 


00 


'. 50 


00 


20 


00 


96 


18 


707 


32 


112 


12 


5 


01 


36 


44 


150 00 




— $2,855 74 



240 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



72. Medical Building 

Heat and light $4,472 48 

Gas, water and occasional fuel ($1,809.71) : 

Gas, $662.26; water, $1,076 

Central Coal Co 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 

Qeaning (§2,028.14) : 

Allen ^lifg. Co., laundry 

C. Waterhouse, window cleaning 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 

Repairs and renewals ($2,542.20) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son, shades 

City Treasurer, elevator license 

John Inglis Co., installing tubes in incinerator 

La France Fire Engine & Foamite Ltd.. extinguisher 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1,830.83; material, $617.66 

Caretaker, F. P. Mottram, 12 mos. to 30 June (including attendance at 

Council meetings) $1,400 — $30 1,370 00 



1,738 26 


70 27 


1 18 


135 98 


20 88 


50 00 


1,957 26 


17 25 


5 00 


45 00 


16 46 


10 00 


2.448 49 



Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant. 



$12,358 51 
4,472 48 



73. Banting Institute 

Heat, Dept. of Public Works, Province of Ontario 

Gas, $642.30; electric current. $4,901.07; water, $515.18 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, 60c; material, $439.17 

Qeaning ($5,311.17) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 

Canadian Cleaning Co., window cleaning 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 

Repairs and renewals (2.373.01) : 

Canadian Charts & Supplies, charts 

City Treasurer, elevator licenses 

MitcheU & McGill, desks 

Viilcan Asphalt & Supply Co., repairs to floor 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1,580.67; material, $497.53 

Caretaker: 

G. S. Laing, to 30 Dec, $875 — $19.38 (retired) 

H. L. \ ickery, 1 Nov. to 30 June, $960 (less $85 charged to cleaning) 
$20.67 (and overtime, $24.50) 



Less credit for cleaning. 



74. Anatomical Building 

Heat and light 

Gas, $16.72 ; water, $44.92 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 

Cleaning ($1,835.98) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 

C. W. Waterhouse, window cleaning 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 

Repairs and renewals ($1,145.92) : 

Armoured Floor Co., repairs to floor 

City Treasurer, elevator licenses 

Johnson Temperature Regulating Co., repairs 

Vulcan Asphalt & Supply Co., repairs to floor 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $821.46; material, $187.98. 
Caretaker, M. J. Shepherd, 12 mos. to 30 June, $1,400 — $30. . . 



Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant. . , 
Credit for cleaning 



$2,575 57 
5 00 



$6,000 00 
6,058 55 

439 77 

57 % 

80 00 

5,173 21 

10 41 

15 00 

110 50 

158 90 

2,078 20 

855 62 

854 33 

$21,892 45 
4 85 



$2,575 57 

61 64 

253 35 

23 04 

25 00 

1,787 94 

101 20 

10 00 

6 93 

18 35 

1,009 44 

1,370 00 

$7,242 46 



2,580 57 



$7,886 03 



$21,887 60 



$4,661 89 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



241 



75 Hygiene Building 

Heat and light $13,474 73 

Gas, $944.11 ; water, $2,418.43 3,362 54 

Caretaker's supplies ($631.78) : 

Dustbane Products Ltd 3 60 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $52.17; material, $576.01 628 18 

Cleaning ($7,488.39) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 69 12 

Melrose Window Cleaning Co 60 00 

New York Window Cleaning Co 49 50 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 7,309 77 

Repairs and renewals ($1,581.51) : 

City Treasurer, elevator licenses 20 00 

Turnbull Elevator Co 185 48 

Accounts under $10 (2) 6 90 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $1,021.13; material. $348 1.369 13 

Caretaker, James Irwin, 12 mos. to 30 June. $1,400 — $30 (and overtime, 

$15.50) 1,370 00 

$27,908 95 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant. . . $13,474 73 
Credits for cleaning, and for share of gas, water 

and electric current 5.609 84 

19.084 57 

$8,824 38 

Charged to Revenue. 19.35-36 $322,374 78 

Charged to Eaton and Rockefeller Funds 83.073 11 



$405,447 89 



YH. SCHOOL OF HYGIENE 

76. Salaries 

(1) Administration: 

J. G. FitzGerald, Director (see also Administration, Facultv of 

Medicine) $5,000 — $155 ' $4,845 00 

J. Craigie. Secretary (paid also $490 as Lecturer — see below) 

$500 —$10 490 00 

K. M. Kerns, Office Assistant (paid also $350 as Laboratory 
Assistant — see below) 350 00 

(2) Epidemiology and Biometrics: 

R. D. Defries, Associate Director, School of Hygiene, and Professor 
of Hygiene and Epidemiology (see also Dept. of Hygiene) 

$2,000 — $45 1.955 00 

N. E. McKinnon, Associate Professor, Hygiene and Epidemiology 

(paid also in Connaught Laboratories ) $1,000 — $20 980 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

J. Craigie, Epidemiology (paid also $490 as Secretary and in 

Connaught Laboratories) $500 — $10 490 00 

J. W. S. McCullough. Public Health Administration 250 00 

A. E. Berry, Public Health Engineering; (see also Civil Engineer- 
ing : Municipal and Structural ) $500 — $10 490 00 

Miss Mary A. Ross. Vital Statistics, $2,400 — $57 2,343 00 

K. F. Brandon. Fellow, Epidemiology (Sessional) $2.000 — $45 1,955 00 

Clinical Associates, Epidemiology (Sessional — part time) : 

J. T. Phair .300 00 

A. L. McKay 250 00 

Laboratory Assistants, Vital Statistics: 

S. Raven, $840 — $16.80 823 20 

Miss S. R. McCausland 768 00 

Walter Moore 660 00 

K. M. Kerns (see also above) 350 00 

Robert Randall, Secretar>', $1,0.50 — $21.25 1,028 75 

(3) Physiological Hygiene: 

C. H. Best, Acting Head of Department (without salary — see also 

Dept. of Physiology) 

Assistant Professors (paid also in Connaught Laboratories) : 

D. L. McLean. $2,700 — $66 2.634 00 



242 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



E. W. McHenry. ((I $1,700, of which $600 charged to Medical 
Research. Best Fund (paid also $10 for Extension Work) 

$1,100 — $25.50 1,074 50 

J. G. Cunningham. Lecturer (Sessional) Industrial Hygiene, 

$1,000 — $20 980 00 

Research Associates: 

H. M. Barrett, Industrial Hygiene, $2,300 — $54 2,246 00 

Mrs. Ruth C. Partridee. (ft $2,200. of which $1,200 charged to 

Medical Research. Best Fund. $1,000 — $26 974 00 

Research Assistants : 

Miss E. G. Gavin, $1,550 — 133.75 1,516 25 

K. K. Kay. Industrial Hygiene. 10 mos. Ca $80 800 00 

Miss E. L. Mahon. Secretary. $1,200 — $25 1,175 00 

C. R. Cowan. Senior Technical Assistant, (O; $1,800, of which $400 

charged to Medical Research. Best Fund, $1,400 — $32 1,368 00 

Technical Assistants: 

J. D. Brown, $1,000 — $20 980 00 

W. Staples, $950 — $19 931 00 

Miss N. Thompson. $825 — $16.50 808 50 

(4) Chemistry in Relation to Hygiene: 

P. J. Moloney. Associate Professor (paid also in Connaught 

Laboratories) $4,000— $115 3.885 00 

Miss E. M. Taylor. Demonstrator (Sessional) 500 00 

Miss M. D. Smith. Class Assistant (Sessional — paid also in Con- 
naught Laboratories I $200 — $4 196 00 

G. Kimm. Technical Assistant 720 00 

$39,116 20 

77. Maintenance of Department 

(1) Administration ($547.%) : 

Postage $40 00 

Telephone service 388 80 

University Press, printing and stationery 102 90 

Accounts under $10 ( 5 ) 12 53 

Sundry disbursements by department 3 73 

(2) Epidemiology and Biometrics ($495.63) : 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, thermometer 11 76 

Canadian Press Clipping Service 25 00 

T. Eaton Co., books 20 70 

F. W. Fisher Co., reprint boxes 12 48 

International Business Machines Co.. cards, forms and statistical data 36 46 

Thos. Pocklington Co.. graph paper 10 73 

Postage 70 00 

Stephens Sales Ltd.. coupons 21 60 

University Press, printing and stationery 260 86 

Accounts under $10 (4) 16 04 

Sundry disbursements by department 10 00 

(3) Physiological Hygiene ($410.49) : 

Canadian Industries Ltd., chemicals 10 49 

Canadian Kodak Co.. chemicals 33 27 

C. F. Casella Co., filter disc 17 40 

R. H. Chappell. glassblowing 27 00 

Connaught Laboratories, alcohol, animals, chemicals, glassware, etc. 239 44 

Geo. E. Wilkes & Son. animal cages 30 00 

G. S. Woodward, making spectroscope parts 10 00 

Accounts under $10 (8 ) 31 38 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. .92; material. $10.59 11 51 

(4) Chemistry in Relation to Hygiene ($728.95) : 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals and glassware 12 03 

R. H. Chappell, glassblowing 50 10 

Instruments Ltd.. rule 10 25 

Wilson Scientific Co., chemicals, glassware, thermometer and 

apparatus 380 91 

Accounts under $10 (9) 45 13 

Qeaner. Mrs. Ada Hall. 83^/2 days 208 75 

Sundry disbursements by department 10 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $4.86; material. $6.92 11 78 

12.183 03 

Paid by School of Nursing 400 00 

$1,783 03 

(Charged to Rockefeller Fund. Hygiene) $40,899 23 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



243 



VUI. FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE 



C. H. Mitchell Dean, $6,000 — $205. 



78. S.-VLARIES 

Dean's Office 



$5,795 00 



$5,795 GO 



Electrical Engineering 
Professors: 

T. R. Rosebrugh, $6,000 — $205 ( retired 30 June ) $5,795 00 

H. W. Price, $5,400 — $175 5.225 00 

A. R. Zimmer, Associate Professor (paid also $10 for Extension Work) 

$3,800 — $107 3,693 00 

Assistant Professors: 

V. G. Smith, $3,000 — $75 2,925 00 

B. deF. Bayly, $2,700 — $66 2,634 00 

R. J. Brown, Lecturer ( Sessional ) $1,800 — $40 1,760 00 

Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

J. E. Reid, $1,350 — $28.75 1,321 25 

M. Ward, $1,050 — $21.25 1,028 75 

W. B. Whalley, $1,050 — $21.25 1,028 75 

J. W. Bell, $1,000 ^ $20 980 00 

C. A. Norris, $950 — $19 931 00 

E. A. Ricker, $950 — $19 931 00 

H. R. Sumner, $950 — $19 931 00 

W. F. McMuUen (resigned 31 Jan.) $542.85 — $10.85 532 00 

R. E. Santo, 3 mos. from 1 Feb., $407.15 — $8.15 399 00 

J. W. Lawson, Mechanician, $2,000 — $45 1,955 00 

W. R. McKee, Electrician, $2,000 — $45 1,955 00 

W. L. Bakewell, Assistant Electrician, $1,050 — $21.25 1,028 75 

Mrs. G. E. Hammersley, Office Assistant and Librarian (o $1,150, of 
which half charged to Civil Engineering: Municipal and Structural, 

$575 — $11.88 563 12 



$35,616 62 



Mechanical Engineering 
Professors: 

R. W. Angus, $6,000 — $205 $5,795 00 

E. A. Allcut (paid also $410 for Extension Work) $4,500 — $135. . . 4,365 00 

Ross Taylor, Associate Professor, $3,600 — $99 3,501 00 

W. G. Mcintosh, Assistant Professor (paid also $10 for Extension 

Work) $3.200 — $83 3,117 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

G. R. Lord, $2,250 — $52.50 2,197 50 

T. C. Graham, $1,950 — $43.75 1,906 25 

R. C. Wiren, $1,800 — $40 1,760 00 

G. H. Hally, $1,800 — $40 1.760 00 

Demonstrators, Thermodynamics (Sessional) : 

F. G. Ewens, $1,100 — $22.50 1,077 50 

R. J. Birss, $1,000 — $20 980 00 

E. B. MacRobie. $1,000 — $20 980 00 

R. S. Segsworth, $1,000 — $20 980 00 

Demonstrators, Hydraulics (Sessional) : 

E. G. Gallagher, $1,000 — $20 980 00 

H. A. Marten, $1,000 — $20 980 00 

W. R. Sirman, $1,000 — $20 980 00 

L. E. Jones. 3% mos. from 6 Jan 525 00 

Demonstrators, Machine Design (Sessional) : 

S. C. D. Lawson, $1,100 — $22.50 1.077 50 

D. G. McGorman, $1,000 — $20 980 00 

F. Hickey, Engineer and Machinist, $2,000 — $45 1.955 00 

Arthur Savage, Assistant Machinist, 1,323 hours <ir 70c 926 10 

Earl Burt, Fireman, 1.532 hours (it 50c 766 00 

W. Odd, Laboratory Attendant, $1,200 — $25 1.175 00 

Miss M. Burt, Office Assistant and Librarian, $1,100 — $22.50 1,077 50 



$39,841 35 



244 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Civil Engineering: Municipal and Structural 
Professors : 

C. R. Young. Civil Engineering. $5,200— $165 $5,035 00 

T. R. Loudon. Applied Mechanics $4,900 — $151 4,749 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

C. F. Morrison, Civil Engineering. $2,400 — $57 2.343 00 

M. J. C. Lazier. Applied Mechanics, $2,300 — $54 2,246 00 

W. L. Sagar. Civil Engineering. $2,100 — $48 2,052 00 

A. E. Berry, Special Lecturer. Municipal Engineering (Sessional — paid 

also U96 in School of Hygiene) $1,000 — $22.50 977 50 

C. E. Helwig, Demonstrator (Sessional) $1.200 — $25 1,175 00 

J. Brown, Laboratory Assistant. $1,100— $22.50 1.077 50 

W. Kubbinga. Mechanician. $1,000 — $20 980 00 

Mrs. G. E. Hammersley. Office Assistant and Librarian (see also 

Electrical Engineering) $575 — $11.87 563 13 

$21,198 13 



i 



Civil Engineering: Surveying and Geodesy 

W. M. Treadgold. Professor (paid also $562.50 for Summer Camp) 

$4,500 — $135 $4,365 00 

Associate Professors: 

S. R. Crerar (paid also $500 for Summer Camp) $4,000 — $115 3,885 00 

E. W. Banting (paid also $475 for Summer Camp) $3.800— $107. . 3,693 00 
J. W. Melson, Assistant Professor (paid also $412.50 for Summer Camp) 

$3,450 — $93 3,357 00 

T. L. Rowe, Instructor (Sessional — paid also $100 for Summer Camp) 

$1,400 — $30 1,370 00 

R. C. McMordie, Demonstrator. 3 mos 375 00 

C. T. Harding. Mechanician, (o $875. of which $400 charged to Applied 
Physics and $100 to Photographic Service (paid also $278.50 in Special 

Research) $375 — $7.50 367 50 

Miss R. Cave, Office Assistant and Librarian, (aj $1,225, of which $500 
charged to Appliec^ Physics and $100 to Photographic Service, 
$62.5— $13 612 00 

Mining Engineering 

H. E. T. Haultain, Professor. $6,000 — $205 $5,795 00 

Associate Professors: 

F. C. Dyer, $4,000 — $115 3.885 00 

J. T. King. $4.000 — $115 3,885 00 

S. E. Wolfe, Instructor (Sessional — paid also $50 for Summer Field 

Work) $1,650 — $36.25 1,613 75 

Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

J. E. Anderson (resigned 15 Mar. ) $785.72 — $15.72 770 00 

J. E. Hanlon. 1 month 150 00 

E. Tozer. Laboratory Assistant and Mechanician. $1,400 — $30 1.370 00 

C. Waybrant. Laboratory Attendant. Assaying. $1,250 — $26.25 1.223 75 

H. J. Reilly, Assistam Mechanician. 30 weeks from 16 Oct.. $900— $18. . 882 00 

C. J. Rickard. Laboratory Helper. 30 weeks @ $10 300 00 

Miss V. A. Jordan. Office Assistant and Librarian. $1,100 — $22.50 1,077 50 

Metallurgical Engineering 

G. A. Guess. Professor. $5,700 —$190 $5,510 00 

Associate Professor*: 

J. A. Newcombe (paid also $330 for Extension Work) $3.600— $99. . 3.501 00 

R. J. Montgomcrv. Ceramics. $3,600 — $99 3.501 00 

.1. E. Toomer, Assistant Professor. $3,450 — $93 3.357 00 

Hector Ross. Laboratory Attendant. 10 mos. (paid also $40 as Messenger) 650 00 
Miss H. Redmond. Office Assistant and Librarian, (fi $750 for 9 mos.. of 

which $450 charged to Secretary's Office 300 00 



Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry 
Professors: 

J. Watson Bain. Chemical Engineering (on leave of absence) 

$5,500 — $180 $5,320 00 

M. C. Boswell. Organic Chemistry, $4,900 — $151 4.749 00 

E. G. R. Ardagh, Applied Chemistry. $4,500 — $135 4.365 00 



$18,024 50 



$20,952 00 



$16,819 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 245 

Assistant Professors: 

E. A. Smith, Chemical Engineering (paid also $261.75 from Stores) 

13.150 — 181 3.069 00 

R. R. McLauglilin. Applied Chemistry. $2,850 — $70.50 2.779 50 

A. M. Fitzgerald. Instructor ( Sessional » $1,600 — $35 1,565 00 

Demonstrators ( Sessional I : 

G. P. Beal. $1,300 — $27.50 1.272 50 

J. G. Breckenridge. $1,150 — $23.75 1.126 25 

W. H. Bowman (paid also $350 in Special Research) $1.100— $22.50 1.077 50 

G. T. Eaton (paid also S450 in Special Research) $1,100 — $22..50. . 1.077 50 

G. V. Jansen (paid also $350 in Special Research) $1,100 — $22.50 1.077 50 

W. C. Macdonald. $1,000 — $20 980 00 

W. H. Rapson. (a $1,000 (less 2 mos. sick leave) $800 — $20 780 00 

J. H. Thompson, substitute, 2 mos 200 00 

H. Boeschenstein. Instructor. Technical German (Sessional — part time; 

see also German ) $700 — $16.80 683 20 

A. S. Hunt. Lecture Assistant and Glassblower. $1.600 — $35 1.565 00 

F. Westhead. Laboratory Assistant. $1,100 — $22.50 1.077 50 

M. L. Hammond. Lecture Assistant. $950 — $19 931 00 

Lab()ratorv Attendants ^(i $10 to $15 per week: 

Thos.' Storton. 52 weeks. 2 days 785 00 

Jack Seymour. 39 weeks 429 00 

Ernest Livingstone. 36 weeks 396 00 

Bert Wood. 21 weeks 210 00 

Robert Fines, 15 weeks 150 00 

Special Lecturers (Sessional) : 

A. V. DeLaporte. Sanitary Chemistry 200 00 

T. Linsey Crossley. Pulp and Paper 100 00 

Miss D. Birkett. Office Assistant and Librarian, (a $1,200. of which $200 

charged to Secretary's OfiFice. $1,000 — $21 979 00 

$36,944 45 



School of Architecture 
Professors : 

H. H. Madill. $4,500 — $135 $4,365 00 

E. R. Arthur. Architectural Design. $4,300 — $127 4.173 00 

H. J. Burden. Assistant Professor. $3,000 — $75 2.925 00 

W. E. Carswell. Lecturer ( Sessional ) $2,250 — $52.50 2.197 50 

Miss J. C. Laing. Librarian and Instructor. Architectural History and 

French. $1.850 — $41.25 ' 1.808 75 

Instructors (Sessional — part time) : 

C. W. Jeffervs. Painting (paid also $1.75 from University Press) 
$1,500 — $32.50 1.467 50 

F. Coates. Modelling. $950 — $19 931 00 

Special Lecturers (Sessional — part time) : 

Mackenzie Waters. Archhectural Design. 6 mos.. $1.000 — $20 980 00 

A. S. Mathers. 7 mos., $900 — $18 882 00 

W. S. Wilson. Architectural Economics (see also Secretary's Office) 

$250 — $10 240 00 

A. Wardell. Heating and Ventilation (see also Engineering Drawing) 

$200 — $4.50 195 50 

H. B. Dunington-Grubb. Landscape Architecture 200 00 

G. A. Arksey. Attendant. Drafting rooms. 8 mos 800 00 

Miss E. W. I>yer. Office Assistant, ((t $780 for 9 mos., of which $330 
charged to Engineering Drawing 450 00 

Engineering Draiiing 

J. R. Cockburn. Professor. Descriptive Geometry, $4,900— $151 $4,749 00 

Associate Professors: 

W. J. Smither. Structural Engineering, $4,000 — $115 3.885 00 

W. J. T. Wright (paid also $291 as Special Lecturer. Technical 

English) $3.700 — $106 3.594 00 

W. B. Dunbar. Assistant Professor. $2,700 — $66 2.634 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

P. V. Jermyn. $2,250 — S52..50 2.197 50 

J. J. Spence. $1,950 — $43.75 L906 25 

A. Wardell (paid also $195.50 in School of Architecture) $1,800 
— $40.50 1.759 50 

Instructors (Sessional) : 

R. M. Clark. $1,475 — $31.85 1.443 15 

G. R. Edwards. $1,475 — $31.85 1,443 15 



$21,615 25 



24^ REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

J. M. Carswell, $1,375 — S29.40 1,34.5 60 

J. Hvilivitzkv, S1.175 — S24.35 1,150 65 

W. W. Fawcett. $1,100 — $22.50 1,077 50 

M. B. Watson, $1,100 — $22.50 1,077 50 

G. Brown, Attendant. Drafting Rooms, 9 mos., $1,100 — $22.50 1,077 50 

Miss E. W. Dyer. Office Assistant (see also School of Architecture) ... 330 00 



Applied Physics 

K. B. Jackson, Assistant Professor, $3,150 — $81 $3,069 00 

Instructors (Sessional) : 

C. A. Booth. $1,500 — $32.50 1,467 50 

V. L. Henderson, $1,500 — $32.50 1,467 50 

Demonstrators ( Sessional ) : 

W. J. Jackson. $1,300 — $27.50 1,272 50 

D. H. Hamlv ( part time — paid also $511.40 in Botany and $198.50 

in Special' Research ) $350 — $7 343 00 

Miss R. Cave, Office Assistant and Librarian (see also Civil Engineering: 

Surveying and Geodesy) $500 — $10.50 489 50 

C. T. Harding, Mechanician (see also Civil Engineering: Surveying and 

Geodesy) $400 — $8 392 00 

Special Lectures 
.Special Lecturers (Sessional) : 

R. R. Grant. Accountancy and Business (paid also $400 for Exten- 
sion Work) $300 00 

R. E. Laidlaw. Engineering Law 250 00 

W. J. T. Wright. Technical English (see also Engineering Drawing) 

$300 — $9 291 00 

F. H. Kirkpatrick, Public Speaking (paid also $600 for Extension 
Work) 250 00 



$29,670 30 



i 



$8,501 00 



Secretary's Office 

W. S. Wilson, Secretary (paid also $240 in School of Architecture) 

$3,100 — $79 $3,021 00 

Miss E. Birkett, Assistant Secretary, $1,550 — $33.75 1.516 25 

Miss M. Fenton, Assistant, $1,150 — $23.75 1.126 25 

Stenographers: 

Miss H. Redmond (see also Metallurgical Engineering) 450 00 

Miss D. Birkett (see also Chemical Engineering) $200 — $4 1% 00 



79. Electrical Engineering 
Supplies ($1,768.93) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 

Arrow, Hart & Hergeman, switches 

Bakelite Corporation, panels and rods 

Canadian National Carbon Co., batteries 

Canadian S.K.F. Co., bearings 

T. Eaton Co.. brushes, stain, etc 

Erie Resistor of Canada, Ltd., carbon resistor 

D. Gestetner ( Canada ) Ltd., mimeo paper, etc 

George Gordon Machine Co, cutter blanks 

Arthur Jackson Machine Tool Co, vise 

Leeds. Northrup Co.. resistors 

Photographic Service, blue-prints, etc 

Postage 

Richards Glass Co., jars and caps 

Ryerson Press, mimeo paper 

Sully Brass Foundry, castings 

Swedish General Electric Co., repairs to motors 

Thomas Corney Typewriter Ltd., typewriter 

Weston Electric Instrument Corporation, terminals, etc 

Wholesale Radio Co., radio parts 

Worr Foundry Co., castings, etc 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( (5) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Stationerv-. $5.05: hardware. $11.31; sundries, $14.30 30 66 



$1,091 00 



$6,309 50 


$262,378 10 


$122 40 


16 58 


20 08 


59 31 


14 47 


15 12 


15 41 


19 34 


116 99 


12 13 


324 21 


12 35 


18 00 


29 83 


31 20 


12 84 


14 30 


141 75 


47 15 


120 04 


30 27 


30 94 


26 82 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 247 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $44.13; labour. $222.41; material. 

$222.20 488 74 

Apparatus (§538.61) : 

Burlec Ltd., circuit breakers 59 40 

George Gordon Machine Co.. cutter and grinder 147 69 

Stromberg-Carlson Telephone Mfg. Co.. radio parts 49 00 

Weston Electric Instrument Corporation, meters 91 58 

Wholesale Radio Co.. radio 190 94 

Furniture, printing and incidentals: 

University Press 25 03 



$2,332 57 
Less credits: Laboratory deposits, $31.37; sale of meters, S15 46 37 



80. \Fechamcal Engineering 
Supplies (S682.65I : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware, etc 

Crosby Steel Gauge \ alve Co.. springs and piston rods 

McCoU-Frontenac Oil Co., grease and oil 

Photographic Service, blue-prints, etc 

Postage 

Scythes & Co.. waste 

Taylor Instrument Co.. thermometer 

Thomson-Gordon Ltd.. packing 

Accounts under SIO (5) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Stationery and supplies. $11.09; sundries. $8.07 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. 54c; labour, $39.22; material. $263.07 
Apparatus — Thermodynamics and .Aerodynamics ($159.42) : 

A. C. McFarlane. patterns 

Taylor Instrument Co.. thermometers 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $68.10; material, $56.72 

Apparatus — Hydraulics ($68.55) : 

Monarch Belting Co.. belts 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $26.34; material. $29.56 

Proportion of fuel for Experimental Plant ($1,061,141 : 

P. Burns & Co 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 

Furniture, printing and incidentals ($243.11) : 

University Press 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $75.49; material, $15.77 



Less credits: Sale of material. $105.35; laboratory deposits. $3.75. 



81. Civil Engineering: Municipal and Structural 
Supplies $289.28 ) : 

,\ikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 

Baines & David, steel 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware, etc 

Photographic Service, blue-prints, etc 

Postage 

University Library, replacement of books lost 

L'niversity Press, stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 5 ) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $13.98; material, $35.56 

Apparatus ($32.60) : 

Hamilton Beach Co.. electrical mixer, etc 

Taylor Instrument Co.. hydrometer, etc 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight 



Less credit for sale of manuals. 



$11 


55 


40 


20 


26 


61 


43 


65 


24 00 


37 


63 


30 


57 


25 


53 


49 


54 


25 


71 


4 67 


2 


22 


$321 88 


26 00 



$2,286 20 



$86 


13 


49 


32 


23 


49 


58 


93 


34 32 


18 


00 


17 


01 


24 


00 


21 


36 


28 


10 


19 


16 


302 


83 


12 


00 


22 


60 


124 82 


12 65 


55 


90 • 


1.060 


39 




75 


151 


85 


91 


26 


$2,214 87 


109 


10 




— $2,105 77 



$295 88 



248 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



82. Civil Engineering: Sur\ eying and Geodesy 
Supplies (1329.36) : 

Art Metropole. steel tapes and chaining pins. ... $110 06 

Photographic Service, blue-prints 46 73 

Thos. Pocklington Co., repairing transit and plane table 18 00 

University of Toronto Engineering Society, field books and supplies 52 28 

University Press, printing and stationery 43 60 

Accounts under SIO ( 5 ) 25 08 

Sundr>- disbursements by department 10 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. §13.07; material. S10..S4 23 61 

Summer Survey Camp — Equipment and Improvements ($129.28,1 : 

Gurney Foundr>- Co.. heaters 45 78 

J. E. Minto. boat and repairs to wharf 80 50 

Summer Survey Camp — Maintenance ($3,971,431 : 
Instructional Staff ($2,401.30) : 

W. M. Treadgold, services, $562.50; living expenses, $55.55; 

travelling expenses, §20 638 05 

S. R. Crerar. services. $.500; living expenses, $47.50; travelling 

expenses, $20; supplies, $2 569 50 

E. W. Banting, services, $475; living expenses, $63.75; 

travelling expenses, $20 558 75 

J. W. Melson, services, $412.50; living expenses, $52.50; 

traveUing expenses. $20 485 00 

T. L. Rowe, ser^'ices. $100; living expenses, $50 150 00 

Sundrv expenses ($895,131 : 

Britnell"; Bakeries, bread 19 32 

Coleman Lamp & Stove Co.. mantels, etc 18 33 

T. Eaton Co., cups and saucers, etc 35 17 

Hewitt Bros., freight and cartage 53.32 

A. Langdon. stakes H 92 

^m. A. Lindop, gas and oil 36 75 

Loblaw Groceterias Ltd., provisions 476 89 

Mrs. J. E. Minto. milk '. 26 40 

C. Trumbull, milk 52 00 

John Welch, fireplace irons 11 00 

S. W. Welch, provisions and hardware 75 80 

Accounts under $10 (3) 13 21 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $4.65; labour, $40.84; material, 

$19.53 65 02 

Payments to help ($675t : 

J. E. Minto. caretaker, 12 mos., $240; ice supply, $35; cutting 

wood. $75 350 00 

Mrs. J. E. Minto, cook 325 00 

$4,430 07 
Less credits: Board at Summer Camp, $1,002; laboratory 

deposits, $191.70 1.193 70 

83. Mining Engineering 
Supplies (S1.401..56) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware $24 75 

Wm. Ainsworth & Sons, weights 12 67 

Canadian Industries Ltd., acids 16 69 

Canadian Laborator}- Supplies, weights and glassware 152 34 

Walter A. Carveth & Co.. objective, etc 13 25 

Central Scientific Co., glassware and chemicals 43 18 

Denver Fire Clay Co., crucibles and lead 115 36 

T. Eaton Co., oilcloth and utensils 113 91 

Fletcher. Russell & Co., clay and stoppers 27 07 

A S. Hunt, glassblowing 36 60 

Imperial Oil Ltd.. fuel oil 30 00 

W. R. McKee. rheostats H 00 

Morgan Crucible Co., scorifiers 52 88 

Ontario Rubber Co.. stoppers and tubing 52 73 

Photographic Service, rectigraphs 12 80 

Postage 4.5 00 

Bobbins & TowTisend, typewriter inspection and repairs 22 00 

Sturtevant Mill Co., grinding discs 16 69 

W. S. Tyler Co.. metal screening 20 22 

Wilson Scientific Co., glassware 61 70 

University Press, printing and stationery 245 OS 



$3,236 37 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



249 



Accounts under $10 (14) 74 99 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $45.68; labour, $24.58; material. 

8130.44 200 70 

Apparatus ($38.99) : 

Toronto Welding Co.. crusher arm 12 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. S8.77; material, $18.22 26 99 

$1,440 55 

Less credit from laboratory- deposits 115 18 



$1,325 37 



84. Metallurgical Engineering 
Supplies ($372.69) : 

Canadian Industries Ltd 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware, etc 

Canadian Liquid Air Co.. rental of cylinders 

Eastman Kodak Stores, plates and paper 

Imperial Refining & Smelting Co.. crucibles 

Edward Orton Jr. Ceramic Foundation, pyrometic cones 

Washington Mills Emery Mfg. Co., emery 

Williams & Wilson, infrax brick 

Wilson Scientific Co., glassware 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under SIO (10) 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, $4.88 ; labour, $9.40 ; material, $22.50 
Apparatus ($133.46) : 

Walter A. Carveth & Co.. camera, hand press, etc 

Ferro Enamelling Co.. paint spray gun 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $6.86; material. .72 



$29 87 


97 


39 


11 


00 


45 


72 


17 


20 


14 


63 


16 


10 


16 


50 


32 


56 


18 


17 


36 


77 


36 


78 


100 


00 


25 


88 


7 


58 



$506 15 



85. Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry 
Supplies ($7,660.53) : 

Armstrong Cx)rk & Insulation Co.. corks 

British Drug Houses, drugs and chemicals 

Canada Wire & Cable Co., copper wire 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. acids 

Canadian Kodak Co.. chemicals 

Canadian Laboratory^ Supplies, glassware, tubing and chemicals.... 

Canadian Liquid Air Co.. rental of cylinders and gas 

Central Scientific Co.. glassware and stoppers 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd.. towels 

Dominion Oxygen Co., rental of cylinders and gas 

General Steel Wares Ltd.. pails 

O. W. Herzberg. chemicals 

Johnson-Matthey Co.. platinum wire and crucibles 

Kelvinator Co. of Canada Ltd.. refrigerant arwl gas 

Lake Simcoe Ice & Fuel Ltd.. ice 

Liquid Carbonic Canadian Corporation, gas 

Mclntyre & Taylor, tripods and plates 

W. R. McKee. repairing motor 

Merck & Co., mercury and acids 

Nichols Chemical C!o.. chemicals 

Photographic Service, plates and slides 

Thos. Pocklington Co.. overhauling balances 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection, etc 

Standard Chemical Co.. spirits 

Textile Products Co.. towels 

Twisswire Brushes Ltd., brushes 

University Library, books replaced 

Wilson Scientific Co.. glassware 

Wood, -Alexander & James, files 

University Press, printing and stationer> 

Accounts under $10 ( 10) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Hardware. $10.68; stationerv and postage. $18.90; sundries, 

$31.83 '. 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $24.97; labour. $906.78; material. 
$738.72 



$86 


31 


424 30 


13 60 


486 


56 


105 


47 


1.466 84 


163 


17 


349 


28 


42 


92 


69 34 


85 89 


96 97 


12 


43 


26 63 


51 


21 


40 


00 


56 


50 


18 


35 


365 


02 


208 67 


22 


72 


94 00 


11 


40 


54 00 


126 


33 


39 65 


25 


20 


1,046 94 


14 84 


274 85 


49 26 


61 


41 


1,670 47 



250 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Apparatus ($577.91) : 

Canadian Laboratory- Supplies, crucibles, etc 

Canadian Liquid Air Co., valves 

Fidea Co., stop watches 

Leeds & Northrup Co., potentiometer 



Less credits: Laboratory deposits, $L277.31; container returned. $ 

86. School of Architecture 
Supplies ($523.32) : 

Art Metropole, paints and brushes 

Artists" Supply Co., frames, canvas and brushes 

Beaux Arts Institute of Design, text books 

Wm. Dawson Subscription Service, subscriptions 

E. Harris Co.. cameo paper 

Photographic Service, blue-prints and slides 

Postage 

Ratcliffe & Ovey, stapler and staples 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 

C. L. Todd, subscriptions 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 10 ) 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $12.09; labour, $16.12; materia 

$35.52 

Apparatus (including books) $126.75: 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., steel shelving 

University Library, books 

Accounts under $10 (2 ) 

Models for Life Class: 

Prof. H. H. Madill. reimbursement for payments made 

Staff expenses — outdoor sketching classes: 

Prof. H. H. Madill, expenses (five members of staff) 

Less credit from laboratory deposits 

87. iEncineerinc Drawing 
Supplies ($273.93) : 

D. Gestetner (Canada) Ltd., stencils and paper 

Lloyd's Register of Shipping, publications 

Photos'"aphic Service, prints 

Star Office Specialty Co., stapler and staples 

University of Toronto Engineering Society, text books and drawin 

supplies 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 10 ) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $68.43; material. $9.28 

Printing Instruction Sheets ($70.96) : 

D. Gestetner (Canada) Ltd., paper and stencils 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Less credit from laboratory deposits 

88. Applied Physics 
Supplies (515.81) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 

Art Metropole. Oswald System 

W. E. Booth Co.. plates and films 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co., glass 

C. Crowther, optical flats 

Eastman Kodak Stores, paper, films, etc 

Imperial Optical Co., lenses 

W. R. McKee. repairing meters 

Photographic Service, plates, chemicals and prints 

University of Toronto Engineering Society, drawing supplies 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (14) 



465 04 


15 00 


17 00 


80 87 


$8,238 44 


1.278 31 


Slfi OfiO 1 ■? 




$12 99 


74 80 


25 34 


11 25 


27 50 


149 80 


20 00 


13 50 


10 20 


15 00 


69 18 


30 03 


63 73 


108 15 


11 98 


6 62 


26 00 


106 75 


$782 82 


17 48 


tTfi'i ^4 




$27 72 


11 89 


24 35 


18 50 


' 30 69 


55 57 


27 50 


77 71 


34 64 


36 32 


$344 89 


34 35 



$40 80 
15 68 
68 65 
10 37 
10 00 
23 21 
13 00 
34 60 

116 66 
29 30 
15 89 
60 45 



i 



i 



I 



$310 54 



I 



A 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 251 



Sundry disburs-ement* by department: 

Postage and stationery, S9.94: supplies. S10.06 20 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. S4.ll; labour, S7.53; material. S45.56 57 20 
Apparatus (S442.82) : 

Canadian Westinghouse Ltd.. tubes 85 00 

Exide Batteries Ltd.. cells 50 00 

W. R. ^rcKee. repairing motor, etc 22 85 

Thos. Pocklington Co.. slide and rule 20 93 

Struthers. Dunn. Inc.. relay 9 01 

Weston Electrical Instrument Co.. meters 67 41 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $112.65; material, $74.97 187 62 

$958 63 

Less credit from laboratory deposits 108 32 

$850 31 

89. General Expenses 

Stationery, printing. Calendar, office supplies and incidentals ($1,644.37) : 

Canadian National Telegraphs S23 08 

D. Gestetner ( Canada I Ltd.. stencils 34 00 

McCann & Alexander, platen and rolls 10 00 

Might Directories Ltd.. city directory 21 20 

National Stationers, Ltd 16 45 

Photographic Service, rectigraphs and prinis 150 43 

Postage 193 00 

University of Toronto Engineering Society, paper, pencils and 

reprints .' 10 38 

L'niversity Press, printing and stationery 1.063 75 

Accounts under SIO '6) 31 10 

Sundry disbursements by Secretan.- 10 28 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. S6o.02; material, $12.68 80 70 

Furniture, fixtures, books, etc. (S19.20I : 

Langley's Ltd.. cleaning rug and covers 9 20 

Scott Glass & Mirror Co.. mirror 10 00 

Clerical assistance (S100.09I : 

Mrs. N. Nixon. 5 davs , 16 67 

Mis? H. M. Redmond. 4 weeks. 2 days 83 42 

Messenger service ( S825 i : 

A. C. Dvkeman. 52 weeks. 2 days 785 00 

Hector Ross, 4 weeks 40 00 

$2,588 66 

Less credit from laboratorv deposits 65 99 

$2,522 67 

90. Photographic Service 

(a) Salaries: 

Professor G. R. Anderson. Manager (without remuneration) 

Photographers: 

C. Crowther. S1.450 — S31.25 $1,418 75 

Mrs. Muriel Milne. S1.200 ~ S25 1.175 00 

Frank Stark. 10 mos. Sl.OOO - S20 980 00 

W Vance. S950 — S19 931 00 

Mrs. R. E. Morley. Bookkeeper. $1,100 — $22.50 1.077 50 

Miss R. Cave. Office Assistant (see also Civil Engineerins: Sur- 
veying and Geodesy i SlOO — $2.10 T 97 90 

C T. Harding. Mechanician (see also Civil Engineering: Sur^•eving 

and Geodesy » SlOO — $2 98 00 

Fred Sayer, >i'essenger and Studio Assistant 600 00 

$6,378 15 

(b) Expenses: 

Supplies: 

W. E. Booth Co.. plates and paper $188 02 

Canadian General Electric Co.. lamps and light meter 20 71 

Eastman Kodak Stores, photo supplies and plates 442 32 

T. Eaton Co.. camera bellows, cheesecloth and films 28 76 

Gevaert Co. of America, plates 244 31 

Instruments Ltd.. carbons and blue-prints 83 11 

National Drug & Chemical Co.. chemicals 102 00 

Polaroid Corporation, polarizer screens 36 45 

.1. Frank Raw Co.. dividers, paper, etc 53 02 

Rectigraph Co.. timer and paper 158 65 



252 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (8) 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $2.09; labour, $7.57; material, 
$5.89 



79 54 
45 34 




15 55 


$1,497 78 





Note: 



Receipts for photographic work done for various departments (including 
Accounts Receivable, $122.62) amounted to $4,681.35. 



$7,875 93 



91. Mining Building (including Mill Building) 

Heat and light $7,270 94 

Gas, $976.09; water. $474.87 1,4.50 96 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 260 68 

Cleaning ($3,514.08) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 27 % 

New York Window Cleaning Co 51 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 3,435 12 

Repairs and renewals ($2,751.41) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son, shades 13 76 

City Treasurer, elevator licenses 15 00 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 33 75 

Accounts under $10 (3) 17 13 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1,822 ; material, $849.77 2,671 77 

Sundries: Work in Room No. 15: 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $423.54; material. $275.65 699 19 

Caretaker, A. Clarke, 12 mos. to 30 June, $1,400 — $30 (and overtime, 

$75 ) 1.370 00 

$17,317 26 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant . . . $7,270 94 

Credit for cleaning 31 (X) 

— 7,301 94 



$10,015 32 



92. Engineering Building 

Heat and light $3,374 48 

Gas, $73.%; water, $128.57 202 53 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 195 62 

Cleaning ($1,726.34) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 20 64 

New York Window Cleaning Co '. . 43 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 1,662 70 

Repairs and renewals ($2,106.99) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son, shades 18 19 

City of Toronto. Dept. of Works, repairs to valve 22 32 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 118 60 

Superintendent's Dept, labour, $1,353.19; material, .$594.69 1,947 88 

Caretaker. F. Baker, 12 mos. to 30 June, $1,400 — $30 (and overtime, 

$123) 1.370 00 

$8,975 % 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant. . . $3,374 48 

Credit for cleaning, etc 146 98 

3,521 46 



1 



$5,454 50 



93. Electrical Building (including Mechanical Building 
AND Wind Tunnel) 

Heat and light $4,589 81 

Fuel for Experimental Plant: 

P. Burns & Co 1.200 00 

Gas, $62.88 ; water, $373.73 436 61 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 114 55 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



253 



Cleaning ($1,951.63) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 22 54 

New York Window Cleaning Co 18 75 

C. \^'aterhcuse, window cleaning 45 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 1,865 34 

Repairs and renewals ($1,332.21) : 

City Treasurer, elevator licenses 10 00 

Accounts under $10 ( 2 ) 7 75 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $800.71 ; material, $513.75 1,314 46 

Caretaker, F. F. Hitchcock. 12 mos. to 30 June, $1,450 — $31.25 (and 

overtime. $2.50 ) 1.418 75 

$11,043 56 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant . . $4,589 81 
Credit for cleaning 14 00 



4.603 81 



$271 23 
16 20 




22 47 




5 00 
119 70 




286 30 




$720 90 
271 23 


$449 67 




$313,778 00 



94. Geodetic Observatory Building 

Heat and light 

Water 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 

Cleaning ($124.70) : 

C. Waterhouse, window cleaning 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 

Repairs and renewals: 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $243.06; material, $43.24 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant 



IX. FACULTY OF DENTISTRY 

95. Salaries 

(a) Regular Staff 
Professors : 

W. Seccombe, Preventive Dentistry, also Dean of Faculty (ob. 16 

Jan. — remainder of salary to 30 June paid to widow ) $6,000 — $205 $5,795 00 
A. D. A. Mason, Clinical Dentistry, also Acting Dean of Faculty from 

13 Feb. (paid also $96.85 in Faculty of Medicine) $5,000— $156.85 4,843 15 

F. M. Lott, Prosthetic Dentistry (paid also $25 for Extra Mural 
Lectures) $5,000 — $155 4.845 00 

A. E. Webster. Operative Dentistry, $4,000 — $115 (retired 30 June) 3.885 00 

T. Cowling, Dental Technology and Metallurgy, $2,000 — $45 1.955 00 

G. C. Cameron. Dental Pathology and Bacteriology (paid also $25 
for Extra Mural Lectures and $21 for Post Graduate Courses) 

$3,000 — $75 2.925 00 

C. A. Corrigan. Orthodontia, $2,500 — $60 2.440 00 

S. S. Crouch. Dental Anatomy 700 00 

E. W. Paul, Dental Surgery and Anaesthesia (paid also $77 for Post 
Graduate Courses ) 680 00 

F J. Conboy. Dental Praxis 400 00 

R. Gordon McLean, Dental Praxis (paid also $50 as Associate) .... 200 00 

I. H. Ante, Crown and Bridge Prosthesis (without salary — paid $85 

for Extra Mural Lectures) 

Associate Professors: 
Dentistry: 

W. G. Switzer, $4,000 — $115 3,885 00 

H. A. Hoskin, $4.000 — $115 3.885 00 

C. A. Kennedy, Orthodontia, also Librarian and Curator of Museum, 
$1,100 — $22.50 1.077 50 

F. A. Clarkson, Medicine (paid also $300 in Faculty of Medicine) . . 360 00 
Fulton Risdon. Oral Surgery (paid also $25 for Extra Mliral 

Lectures and $21 for Post Graduate Courses) 180 00 

E. S. Ryerson. Assistant Professor. Surgery (see also Faculty of 
Medicine) $400 —$13 387 00 



254 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Associates: 
Dentistry : 

S. M. Richardson (paid also $15 for Extra Mural Lectures and 

$38 for Post Graduate Courses ) $3,150 — $81 

L. F. Knieger (paid also $95 for Extra Mural Lectures) $1,500 

ftoo 50 

G. H. Coram,' $1,466 — $36. .... '. .... '. '. '. .................. . . '. 

H. A. Ross 

G. D. Beierl 

F. L. Cole < paid also $25 for Extra Mural Lectures I 

J. H. Duff. $945 — $18.90 

W. T. Holmes (paid also $25 for Extra Mural Lectures) $1,000 

— $20 

W. L. Hugill (paid also $50 for Extra Mural Lectures) 

G. V. Morton 

.1. M. Sheldon (paid also $25 for Extra Mural Lectures) 

R. R. Walker 

R. S. Woollatt 

R. Gordon McLean ( see also above ) 

Miss W. C. Riddle. Histolog\-. Bacteriology and Pathology, $2,160 

— $49.80 

Prosthetic Dentistry: 

R. T. Godfrey (paid also $35 for Extra Mural Lectures* $1,200 

~ $25 

R. G. Ellis (paid also $30 for Extra Mural Lectures and $12 

for Post Graduate Courses) $2,400 — $57 

M. A. Cox. Preventive Dentistry (paid also $30 in School of 

Nursing ) 

J. H. Johnson. Dental Surgery and Anaesthesia (paid also $15 for 

Extra Mural Lectures and $34 for Post Graduate Courses) 

$2,900 — $72 

C. H. M. Williams. Periodontia (half t'me — paid also $25 for Extra 

Mural Lectures and $53 for Post Graduate Courses) $1,500 — 

$32.50 

Demonstrators. Assistants, etc. (Sessional) : 

P. G. Anderson, Demonstrator. Dentistry 

E. M. Rigsby. Instructor, Dental Technology 

C. C. Rons. Lecturer. Anplied Chemistry and Metallurgy (see also 

Office Staff ) $300 — $7.60 

Miss D. F. J. Berry. Preventive Assistant, 10 mos.. $950— $19 

J. Kreutzer. Demonstrator. Prosthetic Dentistry, and Fellow, 

Bacteriology and Pathology, $900 — $18 

G. B. S^iillinston. Demonstrator. Prosthetic Dentistry (part time — 

paid also $10 in School of Nursing) 

E. .1. Pratt. Special Lecturer. English (see also Facultv of Medicine) 
G. L. Assie. Instructor. French (see also Faculty of Arts) $180- — 

$4.25 

R. S. Hosking. Instructor. English Expression (paid also $15 in 

Social Science and $200 for Extension Work ) 

Laboratory Assistants: 
Technicians: 

W. V. Byrne. Dentistry, 10 mos., $1,900 — $42.50 

Miss Inez A. Bumby. Bacteriology and Pathology, $1,020 — 

$20.50 

H. F. Whittaker. Histology (part time — see also Anatomy) 

$120 — $2.40 

Mrs. M. Gratton. Histology (part time) 34 weeks @ $9 

H. Aylward. Infirmary. $1.200 — $25 

(fc) Infirmary Staff {including Nurses) 

Nurses: 

Miss L. A. Cameron. Supervisor. Dental Nurses in Training, 10 

mos., $1,300 — $27.50 

Miss L. E. Tutt. 10 mos.. $900 — $18 

Miss A. J. Park. 10 mos 

Miss F. G. Whitehead, 8 mos 

Miss A. H. Rose. 8 mos 

Miss M. E. Crerar. 10 mos 

Miss Muriel Graham. 10 mos 

Miss A. E. Phipps, 10 mos 



3.069 00 


1.467 


50 


1.370 


00 


500 


00 


750 


00 


670 


00 


926 


10 


980 00 


670 


00 


670 00 


670 


00 


670 00 


670 00 


50 00 


2.110 


20 


1,175 


00 


2.343 


00 


520 00 


2.828 


00 



1.457 50 



495 00 
240 00 


292 
931 


40 
00 


882 


00 


700 00 
360 00 


175 


75 


100 


00 


1.857 


50 


999 50 


117 60 

306 00 

1,175 00 

$70,650 70 



.272 50 
882 00 
800 00 
800 00 
798 00 
700 00 
700 00 
700 00 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



255 



R. M. Turner, Instructor, Typewriting 

Mrs. L. Barraclough, Laundress, 42 weeks (f! $16.45. 



100 00 
690 90 



(c) Office Staff 

C. C. Rous, Secretary (paid also S292.40 as Lecturer) $2,800 — $71.40. . $2,728 60 

Miss F. A. Cook, Secretary to the Dean. $1,560 — $34 1,526 00 

Miss R. C. Hopkins, Assistant to the Secretary. $1,200 — $25 1.175 00 

Miss E. B. Mimms, Assistant in Library, $1,020 — $20.50 999 50 

Miss L. Park, Cashier in Infirmary% 10 mos., $1,100 — $22.50 1,077 50 

Miss Flora Ward. Stenographer, $900 — $18 882 00 



$7,443 40 



95a. Post Graduatk Courses 
Honoraria to Instructors: 

G. C. Cameron 

A. F. Fenton 

A. W. Lindsay 

S. M. Richardson 

C. H. M. Williams 

R. G. Ellis 

T. H. Johni*nn 

E. W. Paul 

Fulton Risdon, $21 ; expenses, $5 

96. Laboratory and Infirmary Supplies, Etc. 

Agfa Ansro Ltd.. film and paper 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 

Art Metropole. slide boxes, paper, etc 

Ash Temple Co., dental supplies 

Bio-Chemistry Dept. laboratory supnlies 

Burke Electric & X-Ray Co.. intensifying screens 

Canad-an Fairbanks-Morse Co.. cement, etc 

Canadian Harrison & Van '^'inkle Co., pumice 

Canadian Laboratorv Supplies, scales, etc 

Canadian Laundr\ Machinery Co.. new parts 

Canad'fin Tumbler Co.. tumblers 

L. D. Caulk Co., dental compound, etc 

Central Scif^ntific Co.. glassware, paper, etc 

Chemistry Dept.. laboratory and sundry supplies 

Columbia Dental & X-Ray Corporation, dental supplies 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co., plates 

Cook Laboratories of Canada, ampules 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd.. laboratory coats 

Crescent Dental Mfg. Co.. test tubes 

Dental Co. of Canada, dental supplies 

Dental Equipment Service, ceramics furnace 

Dominion Dental Co.. compound, etc 

Eastman Kodak Stores, films, chemicals, etc 

T. Eaton Co.. utensils, groceries, etc 

Piorentine Co., plaster models 

E. W. Gouldins:. sheep 

Gregg Publishing Co., text book 

Ed. Green Dental Specialties, dental supplies 

J. F. Harfz Co.. alcohol, needles and thermometers 

Hotel & Hospital Supply Co., towels 

Ingram & Bell, dressing drums for sterilizer, etc 

Interlake Tissue Mills Co., paper napkins 

Lavoris Chemical Co.. lavoris 

Dr. F. M. Lott. photographic enlarger 

S. McCord & Co., plaster paris 

W. D. McNeill, refinishing cabinet 

Medico Co., forceps, file, etc 

Merck Co., chloroform, etc 

National Drug & Chemical Co., chemicals 

National Refining Co., dental engines, $2,045.76; dental supplies, gold 

etc., $3,264.61 

Oflfice Specialty Mfg. Co.. file and library shelving 

Paquin Camera Exchange, tripod 



$21 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


38 


00 


53 


00 


12 00 


34 00 


77 


00 


26 


00 


$12 


12 


36 


77 


84 27 


1,581 


44 


11 


91 


20 


91 


22 


32 


51 


55 


39 66 


65 00 


23 


25 


234 


25 


102 


24 


213 


04 


126 


05 


18 81 


19 63 


253 


50 


12 


31 


2.660 68 


45 00 


983 


47 


581 


93 


114 


71 


38 


30 


21 


00 


28 


35 


86 


47 


92 


72 


40 


99 


133 


70 


79 


35 


33 60 


47 05 


107 


73 


225 


00 


29 22 


22 04 


425 


40 


5.310 37 


246 


50 


20 00 



$8,388 60 
586,482 70 



$285 00 



256 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 163 94 

Physics Dept., laboratory supplies 35 40 

E. C. Piatt. Dunlop machine, oxygen, etc 101 80 

Precision Dental Mfg. Co.. coordnatol 35 99 

Robbins & Townsend, carbon paper and repairs to typewriter 14 20 

Ella Skinner, uniforms and caps 397 95 

H. W. Spence. microtome and cover. $405; less allowance on old 

microtome. $50 355 00 

Wallace C. Sproule. lettering cards 38 00 

Stevens Co.. absorbent cotton, etc 10 93 

Taylor Instrument Co.. thermo-couple 14 64 

Toronto Dental Dealers, dental supplies 102 54 

University of Toronto Engineering Society, drawing paper and pencils.. 33 15 

Victor X-Rav Corporation, bulbs, etc 17 40 

S. S. White Co., electric engines. Sl.686.78; dental supplies, $1,375.34.. 3.062 12 

White X-Ray & Surgical Supply Co.. dental mounts 59 87 

T. W. Woolworth. rubber gloves 12 00 

Wright Display Service, show cards 12 75 

University Press, kits for nurses 197 20 

Accounts under $10 (20 ) 98 91 

Sundry disbursements bv Secretary: 

Laundry. S129; sundry supplies. $62.39 191 39 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $22.41; labour. $1,664.37; material. 

$1,024.05 2.710 83 



$21.%8 62 



Lycss credits: Laboratory- deposits. $1,416.30; wire sweepings. $75.09; 

sale of microscope. $5 1.4% 39 



$20,472 23 



97. General Expenses 

Stationery, printing. Calendar, office supplies and incidentals ($1,877.30) : 

C. P. R. Telegraphs $34 33 

Might Directories Ltd.. city directory 21 20 

Office Specialty Wg. Co.. truck, card cabinets, etc 134 83 

Postage 323 11 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection and repairs 33 30 

Wallace C. Sproule. lettering cards 15 50 

University Press, printing and stationery 1.241 57 

Accounts under $10 (8) '. 38 98 

Sundry disbursements by Secretary: 

Telephone calls and stationery supplies 34 48 

Extra Mural Lectures ($1,653.16) : 

Remuneration Expenses 



I. H. Ante $85.00 $49.15. 

G. C. Cameron 25.00 3.60. 

F. L. Cole 25.00 8.40. 

R. G. Ellis 30.00 35.95. 

R. J. Godfrey 35.00 29.25. 

W. L. Hugill 50.00 16.15. 

J. H. Johnson 15.00 3.60. 

L. F. Krueger 130.00 65.31. 

A. W. Lindsav 230.00 181.30. 

F M. Lott..'. 225.00 167.00. 

G. V. Morton 50.00 39.05. 

S. M. Richardson 15.00 10.87. 

Fulton Risdon 25.00 22.88. 

J. M. Sheldon 25.00 26.30. 

C. H. M. Williams 25.00 4.35. 

.American Association of Dental Schools, dues 



Less received from Royal College of Dental Surgeons, account 
extra mural lectures 



134 


15 


28 


60 


33 40 


65 


95 


64 25 


66 


15 


18 


60 


195 


31 


411 


30 


392 00 


89 05 


25 


87 


47 


88 


51 


30 


29 35 


50 


00 


$3,580 46 


1,353 


16 



$2,227 30 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



257 



98. Dental Bi ildinc 

Fuel: 

Great Lakes Coal Co $1,670 20 

Gas. S498.70; electric current. $2,958.99; water. $319.40 3.777 09 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 628 54 

Cleaning (S2.140.20l : 

New York Window Cleaning Co 30 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 2.110 20 

Repairs and renewals ($2,315,861 : 

.\rt Window Sliades 22 62 

Wm. Bartlett & Son. shades 2 34 

City Treasurer, elevator licenses 10 00 

John Inglis Co.. boiler tubes 51 19 

N. Quesnel. installing boiler tubes 10 00 

Router\- Bros., lathing and plastering 102 60 

W. R. Sherrick. inspection of automatic telephones, new lines, etc... 92 65 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. Sl.480.67; material. S543.79. 2.024 46 

Caretaker. Robt. Eades. 12 mos. to 30 June, $1.400—830 1.370 00 

Fireman, Superintendent's Dept.. labour 777 60 

$12,679 49 

Less credit for fuel 2 55 



$12,676 94 
$122,144 17 



X. FACULTY QF HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

99. Salaries 

(a) Household Science: 

Miss A. L. Laird. Professor ( with rooms, heat and light valued (fi 

$280) S4.200 — $123 $4,077 00 

Assistant Professors: 

Miss Alice C. Willard. S3.450 — $93 3.357 00 

Miss E. W. Park. S2.700 — S66 2.634 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

Miss K. E. Bennett. S2.500 — $60 2.440 00 

Miss G. R. F. Rose <on leave of absence without salarv) 

Miss J. S. Roberts. S2.100 — S48 " 2.052 00 

Miss M. R. McKellar. $1,800 — $40 1.760 00 

Miss H. R. Coatsworth (part time) $1.000 — $20 980 00 

Assistants < Sessional ) : 

Miss L. M. Davis. $900 — $18 882 00 

Miss D. E. Mulholland 800 00 

Miss G. H. Donald. Research Assistant (Sessional) $1,000 — $20. . . 980 00 

$19.%2 00 

Charged to Massey Treble Bequest 2.935 00 

(b) Food Chemistry : 

Dr. C. C. Benson. Professor, also Secretar\' to Facultv (with rooms, 

heat and light valued (a $280) $4,200 — $123. ... .' $4,077 00 

Miss J. R. Panton. Lecturer (Sessional) $2,150— $49.50 2.100 50 

Miss E. I. Walker. Instructor (Sessional) $1.450 — $31.25 1.418 75 

Assistants (Sessional) : 

Miss F. I. Honev (paid also $75 as Clerical Assistant) $950— $19 931 00 

Miss E. J. Reed. $9,50 — $19 931 00 

Miss D. Chapman 800 00 

Miss M. G. Cox 2,50 00 

Miss J. Blundell 200 00 



100. Household Science I>epartment 

Laboratory supplies. ($1,252.30) : 

Acme Farmers' Dairy, milk 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. chemicals 

Canadian Laboratory- Supplies, crucibles, chemicals and glassware 

H. G. Cook & Son. meat 

T. Eaton Co., towels, utensils, etc 



$17,027 00 



$10,708 25 




$27,735 25 


1193 38 

12 91 

142 61 

112 66 

81 09 





258 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Lever Bros 14 95 

Alex. Provan, provisions 629 86 

F. Simpson & Sons, provisions 11 15 

Robt. Simpson Co.. linen 10 2.3 

Accounts under $10 ( 5 ) 25 02 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $7.50; material, $10.94 18 44 

Laboratory attendance ( $1,500 > : 

Mrs. C. Brown, 28 weeks 140 00 

Miss A. Conacher. 45 weeks 720 00 

Mrs. E. Stroud, 40 weeks 640 00 

Equipment and incidentals ($125.59) : 

Continental Rug Co., rugs 50 50 

Accounts under $10 (6) 34 58 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $31.40; material, $9.11 40 51 

Books and special equipment ($641.02) : 

B'nnington Home Appliances, washer 100 00 

Consumers* Gas Co., refrigerator 243 34 

Rogers-Majestic Corporation, Norge refrigerator 168 50 

John Wiley & Sons, books 21 31 

Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, subscriptions 16 85 

University Press, printing and stationery 69 86 

Accounts under $10 (9) 21 16 



$3,518 91 

Less credits: Laboratory deposits $159 35 

charged to School of Nursing 200 00 

charged to Massey Treble Bequest 641 02 

1,000 37 



101. Food CHEMisxR'i Department 
Maintenance ($872.33) : 

BelHnsham & Stanley, polarimeter repaired $12 69 

Canadian Industries Ltd., acid 16 53 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals and glassware 161 30 

^'alter A. Carveth & Co., microscope and lamp 121 00 

Central Scientific Co., crucibles and glassware 102 26 

Warren E. Collins, Inc., lime, soda, valves, etc 13 91 

T. Eaton Co., towels, utensils, etc 46 31 

Merck & Co., chloroform 14 51 

Ontario Rubber Co., tubing 12 84 

Miss D. M. Pearson, Indian food stuffs 18 85 

Thos. Pocklington Co., repairing balances and spectroscope 61 50 

Wilson Scientific Co., glassware 67 52 

University Press, printing and stationery 18 55 

Accounts under $10 (7 ) 31 95 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Stationer)', utensils, etc., $43.50; food supplies, $31.50 75 00 

Suoerintendent's Dept., freight, $5.22; labour, $59,09; material, 

$33.30 97 61 

Laboratory attendance ($1,098,20) : 

Mrs. I. Scott, 42-4 5 weeks 705 20 

Mrs. R. Berr>'. 38M. weeks, HVa hours 392 00 

$1,970 53 

Less credits: Laboratory deposits 239 90 



102. General Expenses 



$26 39 

23 00 

5 00 

102 52 
10 00 

1,077 50 

75 00 

475 00 



$2,518 54 



$1,730 63 



Stationery, printing, office supplies and incidentals ($166.91) : 

D. Gestetner (Canada) Ltd., ink, paper, stencils, etc 

Postage 

Students Administrative Council, "Torontonensis" 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Sundry disbursements by Secretary 

Clerical assistance ($1,627.50) : 

Miss E. E. Cross. 10 mos.. $1,100 — $22..50 

Miss F. L Honey, 3 mos. (paid also $931 in Food Chemistry) 

Miss H. L. Edmison, 9% mos 

$1,794 41 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



259 



103. Household Science Building 

Heat and light 

Gas. $227.83 ; water, $400.21 

Fuel : 

Central Coal Co 

Caretaker's supplies : 

Superintendent's Dept., material 

Cleaning ($1,567.44) : 

Canadian Cleaning Co., window cleaning 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 

Repairs and renewals ($1,137.63) : 

Dustbane Products Ltd.. electrical scrubbing and polishing machine 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co., repairs 

Johnson Temperature Regulating Co., inspection and repairs 

Accounts under $10 (2 ) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $663.46; material, $172.09 

Sundries ($8%.lll : 

Wm. J. McCrimmon. cushions and repairs 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $564.98; material. $256.13 

Caretaker. A. J. Maycock. 12 mos. to 30 June (with rooms, heat and 
light valued (n $420) $1.100 — $22.50 (and overtime. $74.75* 



Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant. 

credit for cleaning 

charged to Massey Treble Bequest , 



$2,689 82 
628 04 

20 20 

112 62 

30 00 
1,537 44 

247 50 

26 25 

18 95 

9 38 

835 55 

65 45 

9 55 

821 11 

1.077 50 





$8,129 36 


$2,689 82 




6 80 




8% 11 






3.592 73 





$4,536 63 
$38,315 46 



XL FACULTY OF FORESTRY 

104. Salaries 

Professors r 

C. D. Howe, Dean of the Faculty. $6,000 — $205 $5,795 00 

J. H. White, $4.700 — 1143 4,557 00 

Associate Professors : 

T. W. Dwight, $4,200 — $123 4,077 00 

Gordon G. Cossens. $3,600 — $99 3,501 00 

R. C. Hosie, Assistant Professor. $2,800 — $69 2.731 00 

G. L. Assie. Instructor. French (Sessional — see also Dept. of French) 

$800 — $18 782 00 

Special Lecturers: 

Alvin Dunn 36 68 

F. S. Newman 20 00 

Miss G. McAree, Secretary in Dean's Office, $1,130— $23.25 1.106 75 



105. Maintenance of Department 

Laboratory supplies and apparatus ($426.83) : 

Art Metropole, paper $14 90 

Central Scientific Co., bottles, corks and mounts 53 71 

Instruments Ltd.. blue-prints 13 41 

National Defence Dept.. prints of aerial negative 21 00 

Photographic Service, lantern service, prints and slides 63 83 

T. A. Quinn, negatives 11 00 

Bertram Young, models 60 00 

University Press, printing and stationery 27 03 

Accounts under $10 ( 14» 52 52 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Text books, $11.50; sundries, $8.83 20 33 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $12.96; labour. $50.06; material, 

$26.08 89 10 

Office supplies, printing. Calendar, postage and incidentals ($349.52) : 

N. S. Houghton, cabinet and cases 41 50 

Postage 75 00 

Bobbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection 10 10 

University Press, printing and stationery 169 96 



$22,606 43 



260 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Accounts under $10 (4) 16 75 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Telegrams, etc., $24.10; stationery and sundries, $9.15 33 25 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1.40; material, $1.56 2 96 

Collecting material for class work: 

R. C. Hosie, travelling expenses 38 85 

Laboratory assistance : 

Murdock Campbell. 40 weeks. 5 days 450 00 

Practice Camp supplies, travel, etc. ($1,971.59) : 
Disbursements through the Dean: 

Wages and expenses of cook and assistants, $149.46; travelling 
and hotel expenses, $161.16; freight and express, $9.06; 

hardware, $20.22; sundries, $15.95 355 85 

Canada Packers, meat 213 70 

Cockburn and Archer, hardware 23 26 

Forest Service of Canada, meals supplied 45 50 

C. H. Irwin, students' and instructors' board and use of canoes 781 50 

Lufkin Rule Co.. metal tapes 11 09 

National Grocers Co., provisions 245 76 

Northrup Electric Co., insulators, tools, wire, etc 46 52 

Pembroke Fruit Supply Co., fruit and vegetables 23 28 

Thos. Pocklington, transit parts and repairs 15 25 

J. Frank Raw Co., prints and transit repairs 14 97 

Woods Mfg. Co., bags and sacks 11 50 

University Press, printing and stationery 12 05 

Accounts under $10 (9) 38 17 

Petty disbursements by department 3 05 

Sundry travelling expenses: 

Gordon G. Cosens 54 90 

C. D. Howe •• 32 80 

J. H. White 20 15 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $18.50; labour, $3.60; material, 19c 22 29 

$3,236 79 

Less received from students for board 1,084 51 



$2,152 28 



106. Forestry Building 

Heat and light $858 35 

Gas, $8.72; water, $11.30 20 02 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 59 70 

Cleaning ($316.50) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 6 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 310 50 

Repairs and renewals ($239.61) : 

Canadian Powers Regulating Co., gear 3 50 

Robt. Simpson Co., repairs to linoleum 15 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $195.34; material, $25.77 221 11 

Caretaker, E. G. Payne, 12 mos. to 30 June, $1,400 — $30 (and overtime, 

$21) 1-370 00 

$2,864 18 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant 858 35 



$2,005 83 
$26,764 54 



Xn. FACULTY OF MIUSIC 

107. Salaries 
Honoraria to Dean and Lecturers: 

Sir Ernest MacMillan, Dean 

H. A. Fricker 

Leo Smith 

Healey Willan 

J. Leland Richardson, Carillonneur 

Miss A. W. Patterson, Secretary to Facuilty (paid also as President's 
Secretary) $250 — $6.30 



$250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
500 00 

243 70 



$1,743 70 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



261 



108. Maintenance of Department 



Printing, Calendar, postage and incidentals: 

Heintzman & Co., rental of piano 

University Press, printing and stationery. 



XIII. SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

109. Salaries 

G. S. Brett, Dean (see also Philosophy) $1,000 — $58.50 

Miss N. MacKenzie, Secretary, $2,000 — $45 

Miss D. R. Bond, Stenographer, $900 — $18 

110. Maintenance of Department 

Stationery and office supplies ($354.07) : 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., cabinet and cards 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (4) 

Qerical assistance: 

Miss Estelle Ridge, Secretariat, Board of Examiners for Professional 
■ Degrees, $50 ; postage, $2.27 



XIV. SCHOOL OF NURSING 

111. Salaries 

Miss E. K. Russell, Director, $4,000 — $115 

Miss F. H. M. Emory, Assistant Director, $3,000 — $75 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

Miss W. L. Chute, Science and Nursing. $2,200 — $51 

Miss D. M. Percy, Nursing, $2,000 — $45 

Miss M. B. Miilman, Public Health Nursing (paid also $5 for 

Extension Work) $2,000 — $45 

Miss E. M. Stuart, Nursing. f(i $1,800 (absent on sick leave 4 months 

on part salary) $1,440 — $40 

Miss M. Jean Wilson, substitute, 4 mos. (paid also $200 as Special 

Instructor ) 

Miss E. N. L. Mortimer, Secretary-Librarian, @ $1,800 less 2 mos.. 

$1,500 — $33.34 

Miss M. Ross, substitute Secretary, 1 month 

Miss M. G. Barnes, Qerical Assistant, $1,140 — $23.50 

Miss M. E. Nickell, Dietitian and Housekeeper (with living valued (5 
$400 — paid also $48.75 as Lecturer) $1,700 — $37.50 

112. Special Teaching 

Critic Teachers in City Schools, etc.. for practice-teacliing purposes 
($485): 

Board of Education 

F. M. McCordie 

University Departments and Special Lecturers ($3,986.75) : 

School of Hygiene 

Psychology 

Biology 

Anatomy 

Household Science 

Physiology 

Social Science 

Lecturers: 

Thornton Mustard, Science of Education. 
Mrs. Florence E. Woodcock, Massage, 

$60 — $1.20 

Miss G. L. Rowan, Hospital Administration 

C. E. Phillips, Principles of Education (see also Ontario College 

of Education ) $150 — $3 

Miss M. E. Nickell, Dietetics (see also above) $50 — $1.25... 



see also 

University 

Extension 



$26 50 
56 09 



$941 50 

1,955 00 

882 00 



78 39 

255 76 

19 92 



52 27 



$82 59 



$1,826 29 



$3,778 50 



$406 34 



$4,184 84 



$3,885 00 
2,925 00 


2,149 00 
1,955 00 


1,955 00 


1,400 00 


360 00 


1,466 66 

100 00 

1,116 50 


1,662 50 

— $18,974 66 



$470 00 


15 00 


400 00 


400 00 


300 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 00 


415 00 


58 80 


150 00 


147 00 


48 75 



262 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



J. T. Phair. School Hygiene (paid also $30 for Extension Work 

— see also School of Hygiene) 

Medicine: (see also Department of Medicine) : 

Beverley Hannah 

Trevor Owen 

J. H. Elliott, $40 — 80c 

Gordon Bates 

Surgery (see also Department of Surgery) : 

W. K. Welsh. $100 — $2 

D. E. Robertson 

W. S. Keith 

C. G. Stogdill. MentaJ Hygiene (see also Department of 
Psychiatry ) 

Alan Brown. Paediatrics I gee also 

H. B. Van Wyck. Obstetrics. ..... r Departments 

W. Easson Brown. Therapeutics. | 



40 00 



Cox \ Oral Hygiene, 

G. B. Shillington. . I se( 



M. A. 

see also Dentistry 
Harvey A^ 
Nursing: 

Miss Elsie Hickey 

Miss J. Knisely 

Miss Edna Moore 

Miss E. deV. Clarke 

Miss M. McKay 

Miss M. Jean Wilson. Special Instructor. Nursing, 2 mos. 
Hospitals and Public Health Organizations ($770) : 

Toronto Psychiatric Hospital 

Hospital for Sick Children 

Victorian Order of Nurses 

Toronto General Hospital School for Nurses 

Canadian Red Cross Society 

Neighbourhood Workers' Association 

Toronto Western Hospital School for Nurses 

Society of St. Elizabeth Visiting Nurses 



190 00 




150 00 




39 20 




20 00 




98 00 




20 00 




5 00 




100 00 




160 00 




100 00 




10 00 




30 00 




10 00 




15 00 




20 GO 




20 00 




15 00 




15 00 




10 00 




200 00 




270 00 




180 00 




165 00 




50 00 




40 00 




35 00 




20 00 




10 00 






$5,241 75 



113. School Maintenance 

Office supplies, printing, postage and incidentals ($587.72) : 

D. Gestetner (Canada) Ltd.. ink and stencils 

Postage 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (5 ) 

.Sundry disbursements by Director: 

Postage and stationer)', $14.35; telegrams, etc.. $13.42; sundries, 

$18.39 

Class room equipment and supplies, library and advertising ($265.65) : 

"Canadian Nurse." advertising 

Centra] Scientific Co.. chemicals and glassware 

T. Eaton Co.. books, flash light, magazines, etc 

Geo. M. Hendry Co.. chairs 

Mrs. E. MarPherson. books 

University Press, books 

Accounts under $10 ( 17 ) 

Sundry disbursements by Director: 

Drugs. $26.78 ; pamphlets and sundries. $14.47 

Travelling and entertainment, extra-curricular activities and occasional 
clerical assistance ($187.72) : 

Geo. Edwards, printing posters 

Artists' services: 

F. C. Sylvester 

Miss D. Veale 

Clerical assistance: 

Miss A. Cook 

Miss M. R. Ross 

Accounts under $10 (5) , 

Miss E. K. Russell, travelling expenses and entertainment of visitors 



$38 72 
83 00 

400 78 
19 06 



46 16 

24 00 
24 28 
43 16 
39 69 
15 00 
15 45 
62 82 

41 25 



10 00 



60 00 




10 00 




25 00 




23 00 




21 47 




^ 38 25 






$1,041 09 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



263 



114. Residence Maintenance 

Residence Physician : 

Dr. J. G. Falconer $200 00 

Wages, food, laundry and miscellaneous ($10,357.86) : 

Pay lists, wages of maids, etc 3,894 84 

Acme Farmers' Dairy 10 30 

B. Amodeo & Son, fruit and vegetables 682 52 

Jas. Bamford & Son, fruit and vegetables 51 80 

Barker's Bread 12 17 

Betty's Ltd., pectin, jams and maple syrup 15 58 

Bredin's Bread 17 40 

Canada Bread Co 265 64 

Canada Packers Ltd.. meat, etc 709 37 

Club Coffee Co., tea 25 20 

Donlands Dairy 522 60 

T. Eaton Co.. kitchen utensils and provisions 117 45 

John J. Fee. eggs 79 70 

K. C. Freeman, tea 29 40 

Glencoe Provisions, meat 55 56 

Grimsby Pickle Co 35 65 

C. Hansen's Laboratory, jelly and junket powder 24 22 

Samuel Harris, meat 186 23 

Heintzman & Co., piano rental 66 00 

S. Lightfoot & Son, fruit and vegetables 48 70 

Lines Ltd., poultry 37 07 

Loblaw's Groceterias Ltd., provisions 859 89 

Maple Leaf Milling Co., flour 34 26 

Michie & Co., provisions 205 68 

R. H. Morris, papers 12 00 

^'' m. NeOson Ltd., ice cream 71 62 

Pacific Mills Ltd., paper 21 73 

Parisian Laundry 370 77 

Parker's Dye Works, cleaning curtains 51 75 

St. Lawrence Fish Market 103 88 

Sheridan Nurseries, plants 50 60 

Standard Brands Ltd., coffee 166 80 

Robt. Simpson Co.. dishes, baskets, etc 10 18 

Slichters Ltd.. flowers 21 80 

M. J. Smith, vegetables 27 10 

Tip-Top Canners Ltd., fruit and vegetables 51 30 

\^ m. Unser. cakes 84 31 

West Disinfecting Co 13 50 

Geo. Weston Ltd.. biscuits 17 4S 

Whyte Packing Co.. meat 45 30 

John Wickson, meat 818 02 

G. H. Wood & Co., paper dishes, drinking cups and napkins 87 85 

Accounts under SIO ( 22 1 105 34 

Sundry refunds of fees: 

Miss H. M. Hindmarsh 83 50 

Miss M. L. Landoni 12 00 

Miss M. D. Mills 58 00 

Sundry disbursements by Director: 

Hardware. S7.56; food and wages. $29.77; sundries. S11.91 49 24 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $21.75; material. S14.81 36 56 

Furnishings (S565.18) : 

T. Eaton Co., chairs, curtains, spreads, etc .300 68 

G. R. Hutton Co., luncheon set 21 69 

Jas. Parr, tables 27 00 

rought Iron Range Co., cooking utensils 13 70 

Accounts under SIO (3) 15 48 

Sundry disbursements by Director 8 39 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, SI. 18; labour, S166.50; material, 

S10.56 178 24 

115. Maintenance of Building (No. 7 Queen's Park) 

Fuel (S1.213.44t : 

Department of Public Works, heating $1,200 00 

Elias Rogers Coal Co 13 44 

Water, $185.62; electric current, $536.67; gas, $269.41 991 70 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 224 09 



$11,123 04 



264 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Repairs and renewals ($959.33) : 

Art Window Shades Co.. repairs 2 47 

Routery Bros., plastering 30 45 

Robt. Simpson Co., supplying and laying linoleum 154 75 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $568.76; material. $202.90 771 66 

Sundries (§530.06): 

Bell Telephone Co 451 41 

Grounds: 

B. W. Miller & Co.. plant? 36 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $29.01 ; material, $13.64 42 65 

Caretaker, T. Marriott. 12 mos. to 30 June. $1.200 — $25 (and overtime, 

$17.25) 1,192 25 

$5,110 87 

$41,491 41 

Charged to Revenue. 1935-36 $5,000 00 

Charged to Rockefeller Fund 36,491 41 



XV. SOCIAL SCIENCE 
116. Salaries 

E. J. Urwick. Acting Director (without salary — paid in Political 

Economy ) 

Miss A. C. McGregor. Assis.tant Director. $2,400 — $57 $2,343 00 

A. E. Grauer. Assistant Professor (paid also $30 for Extension Work and 

$30 from University Press) $3,000 — $75 2.925 00 

Miss Barbara Finlayson. Lecturer ( Sessional ) $2,400 — $57 2.343 00 

Instructors (Sessional* : 

D. G. McCullagh. $1,000 — $20 980 00 

C. W. M. Hart. Sociology (without salary I 

Miss E. B. Bambridge. Secretary- Librarian, $1,350 — $28.75 1,321 25 

Special Lecturers: 

Miss K. Gorrie 150 00 

Miss Frieda Held 150 00 

Robert E. Mills 150 00 

F. N. Stapleford 150 00 

Miss Nora Lea 110 00 

St. George's School for Child Study 100 00 

Miss Charlotte Whitton 50 00 

Mrs. Helen Lawrence 45 00 

Miss Ethel Law 40 00 

Miss M. Bell 20 00 

Miss Margaret Gould 20 00 

R. S. Hosking (paid also in Dentistry) 15 00 

M. M. Cohn 15 00 

Wilfred Scott 10 00 

Miss G. Hill 5 00 

$10,942 25 

Less paid by School of Nursing 130 00 

117. Maintenance OF Department 
Office supplies, printing. Calendar, postage and incidentals ($6%.64) : 

Miss Barbara Finlayson, field work expenses $18 80 

Postage 127 00 

University Press, printing and stationery 322 15 

Accounts under $10 (13) 56 19 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Bulletins and Year Books, $16.44; stationery, etc., $17.40; 

telegrams, etc., $5.66 39 50 

Qerical assistance: 

Miss H. Matchett. 241/:. days 83 00 

Miss A. Saunders. 1 month 50 00 

Library ($118.38) : 

University Press 63 55 

Accounts under $10 ( 13 1 54 83 

$815 02 

Less paid by School of Nursing 70 00 



$41,491 41 



$10,812 25 



$745 02 



$11,557 27 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



265 



XVI. 118. EXAMINATIONS 



Abbott, Miss E. B. 

Adams, S. M 

Ade, W 

Ainslie, D. S 

Allcut, E. A 

Allen, L 

Anderson, F. H.. . . 
Anderson, P. G... 

Andison. J. G 

Angus. R. W 

Ante. I. H 

Ardagh, E. G. R... 

Armour, R. G 

Armstrong, H. G. . 

Arnold, R. K 

Arthur, E. R 

Ashley, C. A 

Auld. F. C 



Bailey, D. L 

Baillie. W. H. T 

Bain, J. W 

Baker, A. W 

Balthazard, Miss I. G. 

Banks, E. A. H 

Banting, E. W 

Batt, H. E 

Beal. G. P 

Beamish. F. E 

Beatty. S 

Bell, J. W 

Bell, Miss M 

Bellisle, Rev. H. S.... 

Bennett, H 

Benson. Dr. C. C 

Best, C. H 

Biggs, G. M 

Birss, R. J 

Blackwood, W. C 

Bladen, V. W 

Boeschenstein, H 

Book, M. H 

Boswell, M. C 

Bott, E. A 

Bowen. A. J 

Bowman, W. H 

Box. H. K 

Branion, H. D 

Brebner, Miss J 

Breckenridge, J. G. .. 

Brett. G. S 

Brooks, E. F 

Brown, Alan 

Brown, R. J 

Br>ant, L R 

Buchanan, M. A 

Burden, H. J 

Burk. J. D 

Burnham, H 

Burt-Gerrans, J. T. . . . 

Burton, E. F 

Caesar, L 

Cameron, G. C 

Campbell, W. R 

Cano, J 

Carr, Rev. H 

Carscadden, W. G... 



Remuneration 
to Examiner 



7 63 
13 13 
35 50 

10 75 
22 50 

2 50 
5 25 

11 75 

12 13 

22 75 
18 75 

23 50 
45 00 
45 00 

10 50 
10 50 
17 00 

13 00 
12 00 

10 00 

11 50 

7 75 

8 00 
5 25 

16 75 



Presiding 
Officer 



9 00 



34 00 


25 


50 


5 


50 


2 63 


1 


25 


10 


00 


45 


00 


20 


75 


8 


50 


27 


00 


7 


15 


24 


25 


5 


75 


5 00 


16 25 


25 


75 


5 


25 


45 00 


37 


25 


21 


00 


5 00 


7 


50 


45 


00 


5 


75 


12 


00 


10 


75 


31 


50 


45 00 


5 


25 


40 


50 



27 00 
9 OO 



75 00 
30 00 



.\ttendance 



45 60 



4 00 

12 00 
27 00 



7 50 



6 00 

27 00 



6 00 



126 00 
9 00 



7 50 



27 00 



Totals 


16 63 


13 13 


35 50 


10 75 


22 50 


2 50 


5 25 


11 75 


12 13 


22 75 


18 75 


23 50 


45 00 


45 00 


27 00 


19 50 


10 50 


17 00 


13 00 


87 00 


10 00 


11 50 


37 75 


8 00 


5 25 


16 75 


7 50 


34 00 


25 50 


6 00 


27 00 


5 50 


2 63 


1 25 


10 00 


45 00 


6 00 


20 75 


8 50 


72 60 


7 15 


24 25 


5 75 


126 00 


14 00 


16 25 


25 75 


4 00 


7 50 


5 25 


45 00 


37 25 


12 00 


21 00 


5 00 


27 00 


7 50 


45 00 


5 75 


12 00 


10 75 


31 50 


45 00 


27 00 


5 25 


40 50 



266 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Carswell. J. M 

Carswell. W. E 

Castell. C. H 

Gates, H. A 

Chant. C. A 

Chant, S. N. F 

Clark, C. C 

Qark, G. F 

Clark, R. M 

Clark, S. D 

Qarkson. F. A 

Clawson. Miss E. E.. . . 

Clawson. W. H 

Coatsworth. Miss H. R. 

Cochrane. C. N 

Cockburn. J. R 

Cole. Miss A. C 

Cole. C. E. C 

Coleman, H. M 

Conbov. F. J 

Cook. Miss A. L 

Corrigan. C. A 

Cosbie, W. G 

Cosens, G. G 

Cosgrave. G. P 

Couch, J. H 

Cove, A. I 

Coventry. A. F 

Cowling. T 

Cox. M. A 

Craigie. E. H 

Crake. J. E. A 

Crawford. M. M'. 

Crawshaw. J 

Crerar. S. R 

Crossley, Miss K. M.. . 

Crouch. S. S 

Dale. E. A 

Dauphinee, J. A 

Davey. A 

Davis. H. J 

Davis. Miss L. M 

Detweiler. H. K 

DeWitt. N. W 

Dimond. Mrs. J. L. . . . 

Dockerty, S. M 

Donohue. W. L. 

Drummond. W. M 

Duff. T. A. J 

Dunbar. W. B 

Dwight. T. W 

Dyce, E. J 

Dyer. F. C 

EKmond, J. R 

Eaton, G. T 

Edgar. P 

Edwards. G. R 

Elliott. Miss G. A 

Ellis. R. G 

Endicott. N. J 

English. B. R 

Evans. K. C 

Ewans. F. G 

Falconer, J. G 

Farmer, A. W 

Farquharson. R. F 

Farrar. C. B 

Fawcett. W. W 

Ferguson. F. L 



Remuneration 
to Examiner 



5 50 
5 00 

22 00 



64 00 



5 


25 


2 


88 


6 


50 


4 


13 


45 


00 


31 


00 


4 


13 


30 75 


17 


60 


8 


25 


50 00 


10 


50 


64 25 


19 


75 



21 30 
5 50 



14 25 


18 


50 


50 


00 


5 


25 


2 


50 


91 


25 


21 


25 


5 


00 


1^ 


00 


45 


00 


5 


00 


5 


25 


10 


50 



2 63 



5 25 



7 


50 


5 


25 


5 


25 


45 


00 


45 


no 


on 


75 


46 35 



5 75 



Presiding 
Officer 



27 00 
42 00 
4S 00 



46 80 

42 00 
12 00 

12 00 



27 00 



18 00 

27 00 



3 00 



12 00 



36 00 
18 00 

21 (K) 



\5 00 
21 00 
45 00 
36 00 



Attendance 



42 00 



31 50 
6 00 
19 50 

27 00 



22 50 

24 00 

25 50 



25 50 



13 50 

21 00 
33 00 



7 50 



45 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



267 



Finch, R 

Finkelman, J 

Flenley, R 

Fletcher, A. A 

Ford. Dr. Norma 

Fowler, W. J. R 

Fraser. Miss J. A 

Fricker. H. A 

Fulmer. H. L. 

Funnel], W. S 

Gaby, R. E 

Gallagher, E. G 

Gallic, W. E 

Gamble, J. E, 

Gardiner, W. J 

George, Ruggles 

Gilchrist. L 

Glover. J. S 

Godfrey, R. J 

Goggio. E 

Goldsmith, P. G 

Gordon, S. D 

Gould, S. H 

Graham. Duncan 

Graham. R. R 

Graham. T. C 

Grant. R. R 

Grauer. A. E 

Griffith, B. A 

Grube, G. M. A 

Guess, G. A 

Hagerman, A. R 

Halbus, F. W 

Hally, G. H 

Ham. A. W 

Hamilton, D. E 

Hamilton. F. W 

Harkness. W. J. K 

Harris. R. I 

Hart. C. W. M 

Haultain, H. E. T 

Havelock. E. A 

Hav, G. E 

Haysarth. Miss F. M 

Heatley, A. H 

Heebner, C. F 

Helwig, C. E 

Henderson, V. E 

Henderson, V. L , 

Hepburn. J 

Hicks. R. K 

Hill, C. E 

Hodgins. L. C. A 

Holman. W. L 

Holt, G. E 

Honey, Miss F. I 

Hosie, R. C 

Howe. C. D 

Howitt, J. E 

Howland, G. W 

Hume, A. G 

Hurst, R. O 

Hvilivitzky, J 

Ide, F. P 

Ignatieff. Mrs. Florence I. 

Ireton, H. J. C 

Jackson, K. B 

Jackson, W. J 

Janis, A. A 



Remuneration 
to Examiner 



Presiding 
Officer 



11 75 
3 00 
5 25 

45 00 
5 00 

16 75 

44 88 

10 25 

45 50 
5 25 

5 50 

5 25 
16 25 

11 50 
16 75 
11 75 

8 38 
45 00 
45 00 

11 00 
53 00 

6 25 
5 00 
6.50 

34 00 
45 00 



3 30 

14 63 
8 00 
2 63 

45 00 
5 75 
5 50 
5 25 



7 00 
67 00 

12 50 

87 50 

2 50 
45 00 
48 25 

5 CO 

3 75 

5 25 

5 75 

45 00 

58 00 

7 75 
2 00 

28 50 



39 00 

18 00 

27 00 
24 00 



Attendance 



43 50 

4 50 
25 50 



27 00 



33 00 
27 00 



Totals 



6 00 



27 00 

27 00 
30 00 



54 00 



31 50 
22 50 

7 50 

4 50 
6 00 



27 00 

22 50 
4 50 



6 00 
1 50 



11 75 


3 00 


5 25 


45 00 


5 00 


16 75 


43 50 


44 88 


10 25 


45 50 


5 25 


4 50 


5 50 


25 50 


5 25 


16 25 


11 50 


16 75 


11 75 


47 38 


45 00 


45 00 


27 00 


11 00 


53 00 


18 00 


6 25 


5 00 


6 50 


27 00 


34 00 


45 00 


24 00 


6 00 


3 30 


14 63 


8 00 


2 63 


45 00 


38 75 


5 50 


32 25 


31 50 


22 50 


14 50 


67 00 


4 50 


12 50 


6 00 


87 50 


2 50 


45 00 


75 25 


5 00 


27 00 


30 75 


30 00 


5 25 


5 75 


45 00 


22 50 


58 00 


4 50 


7 75 


2 00 


54 00 


28 .50 


6 00 


1 50 



268 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Jansen, G. V 

Jaques, L. B 

Johnston. Miss I. M 

Jones, D. H 

Jones, L. E 

Jones, T. H 

Jones, W. W 

Keegan, R 

Kendall, E. W 

Kennedy, C. A 

Kennedy, W. P. M 

Kenrick, F. B 

Ketchum. J. D 

King, J. T 

Kingston. Rev. G. P.... 
Kirkwood. Mrs. M. M.. . 

Kirkwood, W. A 

Klotz, Oskar 

Knox, R. G 

Krieger, Miss C. C 

Kreutzer, J 

Krueger, L. F 

Lacey, A 

La Flamme. A. K 

Laing. Miss J. C 

Uird, R. C 

Lange, V 

Langford, A. N 

Lasserre, H 

Laverty, A. M 

Lawson, S. C. D 

Lazier. M. J. C 

LeBel, Rev. E. C 

Lehmann, A. J. V 

Le Mesurier, A. B 

Levitt, J. R 

Lewis, E. P 

Line, Rev. J 

Linell. E. A 

Lord, G. R 

Lorriman. F. R 

Loudon, J. D 

Loudon, T. R 

Low. D. M 

Lowe, Rev. John 

LowTv. W. H 

Lucas, G. H. W 

MacArthur. J. W 

MacCallum. H. R 

McConkey. 

McCullough. W. S 

McCurdy. W. J 

Macdonald. J. F 

MacDonald. J. K. L.... 

McDonald. J. L 

MacDonald. Miss M. D 

McDonald. W. A 

McDougall, D. J 

MacFarlane, J. A 

McGilvray, C. D 

McGonigle. A. C. R 

McGregor. Gregor 

Mcintosh. R. A 

Mclnlosh. W. G 

MacKay. L. A 

Mackenzie. A. J 

MlacKenzie. N. A. M 

McKinley. D. W. R 

MacLean, A 



Remuneration 
to Examiner 



5 00 



21 75 



8 


00 


45 


00 


8 


75 


5 


75 


19 


75 


11 


75 


18 00 


9 


50 


5 


50 


7 


75 


5 


50 


15 


00 


13 


25 


18 


75 


34 25 


24 50 


5 25 


45 00 


36 


00 



5 25 



5 50 

15 75 
45 00 

15 65 

7 25 



128 


75 


45 


00 


11 


75 


45 


00 


45 


00 


5 


75 


2 


75 


11 


00 


18 00 


19 


13 


14 25 


22 


25 


45 


00 


8 


50 


29 


50 


50 


00 


33 


50 


45 


00 


30 00 


24 50 


16 


00 


45 


00 


8 


75 



18 1; 



Presiding 
Officer 



27 00 
27 00 



6 00 
3 00 

27 00 
27 00 
27 00 

27 00 



12 00 
27 00 



27 00 
12 00 

27 00 



54 60 
51 00 

27 00 

30 00 



27 00 



30 00 



Attendance 



6 00 

3 00 

16 50 

6 00 



18 00 

31 50 
4 50 



30 00 



31 50 



28 50 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



269 



McLean. E, C 

McLean, R. G 

MacMillan. Sir Ernest . . . 

McPhedran. A. G 

McPhedran. J. H 

McPhedran. W. F 

MacRobie. E. B 

McTaggart. H. A 

Madill. H. H 

Maltby. E. J 

Marten. H. A 

Martin. E. C 

Martin. W. H 

Meek. T. J 

Miller. H. C. H 

Millman. P. M 

Misener. A. D 

Mitchell. C. H 

Moffatt. R. C 

Montgomery. A. E 

Montgomery R. J 

Morris. D. J 

Morrison. C. F 

Muckle. Rev. J. T 

Mueller. Miss V. E 

Mulholland. Miss D. E... 

Murphy. Miss A 

Murray. D. W. G 

Myers. C. R 

Needier. Miss M. C 

Nesbitt. C. J 

Newcombe, .T. A 

Nicholson, T. F 

Norris. C. A 

O'Mallev. Miss I 

OToole. Rev. W. B 

Ozburn. R. H 

Panton. Miss J. R 

Parker. C. B 

Parkes. Miss A. E. M... 

Parkinson. J. F 

Parsons, A. L 

Patterson. Miss F. S 

Paul, E. W 

Pavey. J 

Peterson. H 

Phelan. Rev. G. B 

Piersol. W. H 

Plumptre. A. F. W 

Potter, H. R 

Pottle. H. L 

Pounder. L R 

Pratt. E. J 

Pratt. Mrs. E. J 

Preston. F. C 

Price. H. W 

Price. Dr. R. Margarite. 

Ouinlan. Miss F. M 

Raithby, G. E 

Rapson, W. H 

Rean. Miss M. L 

Reed. Miss E. .T 

Reid. J. E 

Richards. G. E 

Ricker. E. A 

Riddell, R. G 

Riese. Miss L 

Riley, C. W 

Risdon. F. E 



Remuneration 
to Examiner 



18 25 
40 00 
37 62 
32 70 
45 00 
45 00 

11 50 

45 00 



32 00 
10 50 

5 25 



Presiding 
Officer 



5 50 

33 75 
9 25 


11 25 
4 88 


7 63 
50 50 

8 00 
6 50 


10 25 
5 75 



5 50 

4 13 

17 75 
2 75 

45 00 

13 00 

18 00 

31 50 

11 25 

5 50 
2 20 
5 00 

16 75 

32 00 
35 00 



13 00 
3 00 
5 25 

17 50 



15 25 



20 00 
12 12 



Attendance 



Totals 



27 00 
42 00 



18 00 
18 00 

9 00 



18 00 



27 00 



27 00 

33 00 
12 00 

36 00 
57 00 



6 OC 



39 00 



7 50 

4 50 

42 00 
19 50 

36 00 
15 00 

25 50 
6 00 



24 00 

16 50 
1 50 



27 00 



4 50 


27 00 


6 00 


6 00 


25 50 


13 50 



18 25 
40 00 
37 62 
32 70 
45 00 
45 00 

7 50 
11 50 
27 00 
45 00 

4 50 
42 00 

32 00 
10 50 
42 00 

5 25 

19 50 

5 50 

33 75 
9 25 

18 00 
36 00 
29 25 

4 88 
15 00 

9 00 

7 63 
50 50 

8 00 

6 50 
25 50 
28 25 

5 75 



45 00 
27 00 
13 00 
18 00 
24 00 
31 50 
16 50 
12 75 
5 50 
2 20 

5 00 

16 75 
27 00 
59 00 
35 00 
33 00 

12 00 

13 O'l 
39 00 
62 25 

17 50 
4 50 

27 on 

6 00 
6 00 

15 25 
6 00 
25 50 
52 50 
20 on 
12 12 



270 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Robertson, H. G. . . . , 

Robertson, S. R 

Robinson, D. A. F.. , 
Robinson, G. deB.. 

Robinson, T. A 

Roepke. M. H 

Romans, R. G 

Rosebrueh, T. R.. . , 

Ross, J.^W 

Rous, C. C 

Rowe, T. L 

Ruhnke, G. N 

Rush, Rev. E. L.... 

Ryerson, E. S 

Sagar, W. L 

Salter, Miss M. D.. 

Santo. R. E 

Satterly, J 

Saunders, R. M.. . . 
Schofield, F. W.... 

Scott, P. L 

Scott, Wallace A.. . 

Scott, Wm. A 

Segsworth, R. S. . . . 
Sharpe, Rev. W. C. 
.Shenstone, N. S.. . . 
Shepherd, A. L. . . . 

Sheppard, N. E 

Shillington, G. B. . . 

Shore, T. C 

Shutt, D. B 

Sifton, H. B 

Sirman. W. R 

Sissons, C. B 

Smallfield, H. A.... 

Smith, E. A 

Smith, G. O 

Smith, H. G 

Smith, Leo 

Smith, V. G 

Smither, W. J 

Snyder, E. S 

Spence, J. J 

Sproule, J. C 

Sproule, W. H 

.^^auirrell. W. J 

Staples, W. E 

Stevenson. O. J 

Stillwell, E. C 

Stobie, W. G 

Stone, R. E 

Sullivan, Rev. B. . . . 

Sumner, H. R 

Surerus, J. A 

Sykes. J. F 

Tait, M. D. C 

Taylor, T. M. C... 

Taylor, W. R 

Thompson, H. A. . . 

Thompson. R. J.. . . 

Thompson, R. N... 

Thomson, J. E 

Tomlinson, A. H.. . 

Toomer, J. E 

Treadgold, W. M.. 

Tuffy, Miss C 

Turner, G. H 

Underbill, F. H... 

Urquhart, R. W. I. 



Remuneration 


to Examiner 


14 50 


6 75 


45 00 


5 25 


45 00 


5 50 


31 25 


2 50 


76 63 


10 75 


40 50 


33 50 


68 50 


45 00 


73 90 


10 00 



Presiding 
Officer 



45 00 

12 25 
65 50 

8 00 

33 75 

13 88 
8 00 
5 25 
5 50 

11 25 
56 01 
8 75 
16 25 
28 50 

5 50 

16 00 

17 50 
8 25 

18 25 
17 50 

14 75 

5 75 



5 50 

17 25 

5 00 



5 25 

5 75 

5 25 

7 63 

21 25 

8 75 



27 00 



21 00 



12 00 



33 00 



27 00 

93 00 

27 00 



42 00 
18 00 



54 00 

27 00 

24 00 



33 00 



Attendance 



Totals 



30 00 



1 50 



6 00 



25 50 
6 00 



7 50 



27 00 
21 00 

42 00 



18 00 
9 00 



'■■'^^!mw!f''wr* 



6 00 



6 00 

6 00 
3 00 

30 00 



25 50 



27 00 

30 00 
14 50 

6 75 
45 00 
21 00 

1 50 
5 25 

45 00 

5 50 

6 00 

31 25 

2 50 
76 63 
12 00 
25 50 

6 00 
10 75 
73 50 
33 50 
68 50 
45 00 
73 90 

7 50 

10 00 
45 00 
27 00 

12 25 
158 50 

27 00 

8 00 
33 75 

6 00 

13 88 
50 00 

23 25 
5 50 

11 25 
56 01 
62 75 
43 25 

28 50 

24 00 

5 50 

16 00 

17 50 

41 25 

18 25 
17 50 

6 00 

14 75 

5 75 

6 00 
27 00 

3 00 

21 00 

5 50 

17 25 
5 00 

30 00 

42 00 
5 25 
5 75 

18 00 
14 25 

7 63 

25 50 
21 25 

8 75 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



271 



VanWyck. H. B 

Waddell. Miss M. E. G. 

Walker. Miss E. I 

Walker. E. M 

Walker. T. L. 

Walter. Mrs. D 

Walter. F. H 

Wansbrough, R. M 

Ward, M 

Warner, W. P 

W asleneys, H 

Watson, M. B 

Watt, J. C 

Weld, C. B 

Welsh, W. K 

Wey.J.C 

Vvhalley. W. B 

White. J. H 

Whiteside, W. H 

Wilhelm, J. O 

Willan, Healey 

Williams. C. H. M 

Williams. D. C 

Wilson. G. E 

Winnett. F. V 

Winspear, Miss M 

Wiren. R. C 

Wolfe, S. E 

Woodcock, J. N 

Woods, H. D 

Woodside. M. St. A.... 

Wookey. H. W 

Wright, Miss J. G 

Wright. W. J. T 

Y( ung. C. R 

Young. R. K 

Z mmer. A. R 



Remuneration Presiding 
to Examiner Officer 



46 50 
22 50 

2 75 

6 13 
5 75 

12 13 
45 00 

59 30 

19 50 

20 25 

7 50 
45 00 



5 25 
5 75 

55 99 
45 75 



50 00 


5 88 


5 


25 


5 


25 


15 


75 


35 


25 


5 


25 


6 


00 


22 


00 


5 


25 


33 


50 



36 00 
6 00 



Attendance 



30 00 
21 00 



18 00 
24 00 



39 00 



10 50 
10 50 



1 50 
7 50 



19 50 

28 50 

21 00 
1 50 



Attendance 



46 50 

58 50 
6 00 
2 75 

6 13 
5 75 

12 13 
45 00 
10 50 

59 30 

19 50 
10 50 

20 25 

7 50 
45 00 

1 50 

7 50 

5 25 

5 75 

19 50 

55 99 

45 75 

28 50 

50 00 

35 88 

21 00 
26 25 

1 50 

5 25 

18 00 

39 75 

35 25 

5 25 

6 00 

22 00 
5 25 

72 50 



).597 06 



:.674 00 $1,509 00 



$10,780 06 



APPORTIONMENT 



Arts 

Medicine 

Applied Science 

Dentistry 

Household Science 

Forestry 

Music 

School of Graduate Studies 

School of Nursing 

Social Science 

I niversily Extension 

Pedagogy 

Pharmacy 

Agriculture 

Veterinary Science 

Law 



Remuneration 
to Examiner 



$1,198 86 

2.874 45 

521 75 

647 50 

15 75 

31 75 

194 50 

5 00 

21 50 

327 75 

567 00 

150 75 

40 50 



Presiding 
Officer 



$1,339 00 

207 00 

525 00 

111 00 

24 00 

60 00 

54 00 

18 00 

33 00 

33 00 

24 00 
39 00 
168 00 
27 00 
12 00 



Attendance 



$954 00 

156 00 

286 50 

70 50 



9 00 



33 00 



Totals 



$3,491 86 

3.237 45 

1.333 25 

829 00 

39 75 

91 75 

248 50 

18 00 

47 00 

33 00 

21 50 

24 00 

399 75 

735 00 

177 75 

52 50 



16,597 06 



$2,674 00 $1,509 00 $10,780 06 



272 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Remuneration to examiners (as detailed above) $6,597 06 

Presiding and attendance (as detailed above) 4,183 00 

Honoraria for special services as a Revising Committee: 

Prof. W. J. McAndrew, $100; Prof. H. Bennett, $100; Prof. J. N. Woodcock, 

$100; Rev. B. F. Sullivan, $100 400 00 

Examination supplies and sundries ($2,482.39) : 

Engrossing diplomas, etc.: E. Awde, $30.75; S. Harrod, $304; G. B. 

Pritchard. $392.25 727 00 

Caretakers' overtime services: A. Bain, $10; F. Baker, $15; G. 

Town, S7.50 32 50 

University Press, pseudonym books, etc 1,602 94 

Accounts under $10 (2) 5 39 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, etc., $3.93; labour, $108.26; material. 

$2,37 114 56 

2,482 39 

Printing examination papers and class lists: 

University Press 5,707 14 

$19,369 59 
Less credit for sale of examination books, etc 343 13 



$19,026 46 



XVII. UNIVERSITY EXTENSION AND PUBLICITY 



119. Salaries 

W. J. Dunlop. Director. 15.000 — $155 $4,845 00 

B. W. Sharpe. Supervisor, Correspondence Courses and Evening Classes, 

$2,400 — $57 2,343 00 

Miss H. -M. Latter. Secretary, Sl.BOO — $40 1,760 00 

Miss M. J. J. Finlay, Chief Clerk and Stenographer, $1,300 — $27.50 1,272 50 

Clerks : 

Miss D. deF. Milner. $1,250 — $26.25 1,223 75 

Mrs. H. G. Petersen, $1,200 — $25 1,175 00 

Stenographers: 

Miss Grace Anderson. $1,150 — $23.75 1,126 25 

Miss L. B. Alexander, $1,000 — $20 980 00 

W. A. Munro. $1,000 — 120 980 00 

Miss A. D. Wren. $900 — $18 882 00 

Workers' Educational Association Assistant, Drummond Wren, @ $2,500 

(paid from Special Fund) 



$16-587 .50 



120. Extension and Publicity Departments 
(a) Extension: 

1. Summer Session in Arts ($9,540) : 
Teachers' Course: 
Instructors : 

D. S. Ainslie $420 00 

Miss I. G. Balthazard 420 00 

K. S. Bernhardt 420 00 

D. G. Creighton 210 00 

R. K. Hicks 420 00 

V. Lange 420 00 

L. B. Leppard 75 00 

W. J. McCurdy 420 00 

D. J. McDougall 210 00 

J. R. MacGillivray 420 00 

E. W. Mclnnis 420 00 

L. A. MacKay 420 00 

A. MacLean 280 00 

D. Monteith 80 00 

L. T. Morgan 420 00 

J. F. Parkinson 420 00 

A. L. Parsons 140 00 

I. R. Pounder 420 00 

R. M. Saunders 420 00 

F. A. Smith 420 00 

M. D. C. Tait 420 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 273 



Class Assistants: 

H. M. Fry 

L. B. Leppard 

Wm. \^'ightman 

Specialists' Courses: 
Instructors: 

Miss M. Annetts 

S. Bateson 

S. Beatty 

N. J. Endicott 

L. Gilchrist 

E. J. Pratt 

H. L. Welsh 

Class Assistant. H. F. Batho 

Attendance, J. McCormack 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. . . 

2. Teachers" Classes ($6,831.74) : 

Instructors: 

F. H. Anderson 

J. G. Andison 

R. K. Arnold 

H. Boeschenstein 

G. W. Brown 

J. D. Burk 

D. G. Creighton 

Mrs. Sallee Creighton 

H. J. Davis 

W. M. Drummond 

G. P. deT. Glazebrook 

G. E. Holt 

F. P. Ide 

Mrs. M. M. Kirkwood 

Miss C. C. Krieger 

A. Lacey 

A. K. Laflamme 

H. R. MacCallum 

K. H. Rogers 

R. M. Saunders 

F. A. Smith 

G. O. Smith 

D. Snygg 

F. H. \^ alter. 

Miss Mary \V inspear 

Readers: 

D. C. Masters 

D. C. Williams 

Class Assistant. N. W. Radforth. 
Attendance: 

A. Bain 

A. Keel 

J. McCormack 

A. Worseley 

3. Correspondence Courses ($8,529.66 1 : 

Instructors: 

Teachers' Course : 

F. H. Anderson 

J. G. Andison 

R. K. Arnold 

Miss I. G. Balthazard 

E. B. Bealy 

K. S. Bernhardt 

G. E. Britnell 

G. W. Brown 

J. D. Burk 

Miss A. C. Cole 

G. P. Cosgrave 

D. G. Creighton 

J. R. Daniells 

W. M. Drummond 

N. J. Endicott 

L. Epstein 



150 


00 


75 


00 


40 


00 


70 


00 


235 


00 


560 


00 


385 


00 


280 00 


175 


00 


125 00 


50 


00 


2 


50 


97 


50 


150 


00 


300 


00 


300 


00 


150 


00 


150 


00 


300 00 


150 


00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 


00 


150 00 


150 00 


300 00 


300 


00 


300 


00 


300 


00 


300 00 


150 


00 


300 00 


150 00 


300 


00 


300 


00 


300 


00 


300 00 


300 


00 


200 


00 


150 


00 


50 00 


88 60 


27 


68 


2 


00 


13 46 


62 


00 


118 


00 


14 


00 


374 00 


278 


00 


264 00 


20 00 


106 00 


66 


00 


532 


00 


367 


91 


168 00 


272 00 


66 


00 


140 00 


10 00 



274 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

G. P. deT. Glazebrook 

J. S. Glen 

G. E. Holt 

F. P. Ide 

F. B. Kenrick 

J. D. Ketchum 

Miss C. C. Krieger 

A. Lacey 

D. J. McDou^all 

J. R. AlacGillivray 

E. W. Mclnnis 

L. A. MacKay 

L. L. McQuitty 

H. C. H. Miller 

C. R. Myers 

J. F. Parkinson 

H. L. Pottle 

K. H. Rogers 

R. M. Saunders 

E. K. M. Sims 

F. A. Smith 

D. Snygg 

Rev. B. F. Sullivan 

Upper School and Commercial : 

W. G. Baird 

L. S. Beattie 

W. G. Bennett 

A. G. Croal 

H. A. Grainger 

H. G. Harvey 

W. K. F. Kendrick 

W. J. Lougheed 

J. H. Mills 

T. W. Oa^es 

Miss E. M. Rutledge 

W. H. Williams 

4. Evening Classes ($10,658.51) : 
Toronto : 

Instructors: 

J. Alford 

E. A. Allcut 

G. L. Assie 

F. C. Auld 

K. S. Bernhardt 

W. E. Blatz 

H. Boeschenstein 

Mrs. E. A. Bott 

.1. T. Burt-Gerrans 

E. W. Carpenter 

Miss K. H. Coburn 

W. D. Conklin 

G. P. Cosgrave 

Mrs. Sallee Creighton 

Mrs. Alexandra Davidson 

N. Dean 

St. E. de Champ 

W. A. Duncan 

J. M. Elson 

L. Epstein 

R. Flenley 

W. G. Frisby 

Jl. S. Glen 

R. R. Grant 

G. H. Harlow 

J. F. Heard 

R. S. Hosking 

J. D. Ketchum 

F. H. Kirkpatrick 

V. Lange 

C. E. Locke 

Miss I. Loudon 



192 00 


174 75 


2 00 


280 00 


260 00 


10 


00 


22 


00 


168 00 


288 


00 


1.000 00 


198 


00 


68 00 


44 25 


174 75 


202 


50 


10 00 


174 00 


263 


25 


206 00 


414 00 


10 


00 


176 


25 


164 00 


17 


00 


56 00 


130 


00 


26 


00 


166 


00 


40 


00 


28 


00 


186 00 


120 


00 


154 00 


91 


00 


156 00 


200 


00 


410 00 


200 00 


200 00 


300 


00 


100 


00 


300 00 


100 00 


10 


00 


200 


00 


200 


00 


30 00 


220 00 


400 00 


200 00 


10 


00 


400 


00 


10 


00 


1.100 


00 


100 


00 


50 


00 


200 


00 


200 00 


400 


00 


20 


00 


200 


00 


200 


00 


100 00 


400 00 


200 00 


200 00 


270 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



275 



R. H. McCormick 

Miss M. D. MacDonald 

E. W. Mclnnis 

W. G. Mcintosh 

W. A. McKague 

G. A. McMullen 

Miss K. McMurrich 

P. M. MUlman 

J. A. Newcombf 

W. C. Fernin 

A. L. Richardson 

R. M. Saunders 

A. A. Shuyler 

A. Stark 

A. B. Ward 

O. Watson 

R. M. \^inter 

A. R. Zimmer 

Attendance: 

A. Bain 

F. Borebank 

A. Qarke 

H. Hill 

F. Hitchcock 

A. Keel 

E. G. Payne 

S. Rogers 

A. Worseley 

Lantern service. Photographic Dept 

5. Workers' Educational Association and Farmers' Classes ($7,908.55) 
Instructors: 
Toronto : 

A. Brady 

S. N. F. Chant 

W. G. Frisby 

A. E. Grauer 

C. W. M. Hart 

A. Lismer 

D. C. Masters 

L. T. Morgan 

T. Mustard 

J. F. Parkinson 

J. D. Robins 

L. Warshaw 

E. T. Waters 

Miss M. Winspear 

R. M. Winter 

Beaverton : 

H. M. Cameron (including expenses, $100) , 

Brantford : 

M. K. Inman (including expenses, $32) 

E. E. Reilly (including expenses, $32) 

Fergus : 

C. R. Philp ( including expenses, $26.25 ) 

Gait: 

J. G. Perold (including expenses, $97.60) 

Guelph: 

J. G. Perold (including expenses. $72.60) 

Hamilton: 

W. Bethune 

F. H. Kirkpatrick (including expenses, $8.85) 

N. MacDonald 

T. Mustard ( including expenses, $59.00) 

K. W. Taylor 

R. M. Winter ( including expenses, $44.50) 

Innerkip: 

M. K. Inman (including expenses, $8.40) 

Keene: 

J. E. R. Munro (including expenses, $10.00) 

Kingston : 

W. E. C. Harrison 



10 00 


200 00 


660 00 


10 00 


10 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 00 


330 00 


100 00 


200 00 


150 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 00 


10 00 


200 00 


10 00 


161 40 


5 50 


75 00 


81 75 


2 50 


47 32 


21 00 


2 50 


24 54 


17 00 



100 00 


200 00 


200 00 


30 00 


100 00 


200 00 


200 00 


400 00 


200 00 


30 00 


200 00 


200 00 


290 00 


200 00 


200 00 


300 00 


132 00 


132 00 


176 25 


297 60 


272 60 


100 00 


208 85 


200 00 


259 00 


150 00 


194 25 


38 40 


% 00 


200 00 



276 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Kitchener: 

C. R. Philp 

London : 

M. K. Inman 

Miss M. Macklin 

R.Willis 

Oshawa: 

A. Brady (including expenses. S12.40) 

Peterborough : 

Miss B. Lang (including expenses, $128.32) . 
Preston: 

F. A. Ferguson (including expenses, $5.00) .. 
St. Catharines: 

K. W. Taylor (including expenses, $56.00).. 
Stratford : 

S. F. Maine (including expenses, $44.00) 
Windsor: 

C. Sivertz (including expenses, $68.50) 

Woodstock: 

S. F. Maine (including expenses, $49.00) . . . . 

Attendance. J. McCormack 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $22.72; material. $8.41. 

6. Short Courses ($541,251 : 

Instructors: 
Nurses: 

Miss R. Beamish 

Miss M. Bell 

W. E. Blatz 

J. A. Dauphinee 

Miss M. Dulmage 

R. F. Farquharson 

Miss G. Ferguson 

Miss N. Fidler 

C. C. Goldring 

Miss E. Grant 

Miss F. Held 

J. Hepburn 

E. W. McHenry 

Miss E. Mcll wraith 

Miss M. MacKay 

Miss E. McKinnon 

Miss M. B. Millman 

Miss E. Moore 

Miss A. M. Riordan 

Miss E. B. Rogers 

Miiss B. Smith 

Miss A. Thompson 

F. F. Tisdall 

Public Administration: 

A. Brady 

H. L. Brittain 

E. P. Brown 

F. R. Crocombe 

H. L. Cummings 

W. S. Ferguson 

J. Finkelman 

R. J. Moore 

L. A. Pequegnat 

J. T. Phair 

Attendance. J. McCormack 

7. Course in Occupational Therapy ($3,202.80) : 

Instructors: 

R. G. Armour 

H. D. Ball 

Miss Sallee Creighton 

N. Dean 

J. H. Elliott 

J. G. Falconer 

A. A. Fletcher 

Miss J. Hampson 

G. Howland 



200 00 

100 00 
100 00 
100 00 

112 40 

328 32 

205 00 

256 00 

244 00 

336 50 

249 00 

139 25 

31 13 



5 


00 


20 00 


30 


00 


10 00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


10 00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


8 


50 


5 


00 


40 00 


10 


00 


10 00 


10 00 


80 


00 


50 


00 


20 00 


30 


00 


50 


00 


20 


00 


30 00 


2 


75 


30 


00 


75 


00 


200 


00 


10 


00 


30 


00 


50 


00 


20 


00 


100 00 


30 00 



\ 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



277 



Miss H. LeVesconte. $1,000 — $20 980 00 

F. I. Lewis 40 00 

J. L. McDonald 40 00 

K. G. Mackenzie 20 00 

T. Mustard 200 00 

Miss O. Noble 100 00 

Ontario College of Art 476 30 

Miss I. Palen 10 00 

S. W. Perry 300 00 

St. John Ambulance Association 81 00 

A. N". Scarrow 300 00 

E. T. Waters 75 00 

Capital Salvage Co.. bookcase 15 00 

The Weavers, overhauling looms 20 50 

8. Course in Physiotherapy ($2,832.84) : 

Instructors: 

H. D. Ball 75 00 

Miss E. J. Ely. $900 — 818 882 00 

W. J. Gardiner 500 00 

St. John Ambulance Association 81 00 

E. T. Waters 75 00 

Mrs. F. W oodcock,$ $1,200 — $25 1.175 00 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 6 68 

T. Eaton Co.. blankets and pillows 29 34 

Robt. Simpson Co., pillow slips 8 82 

9. Social functions for Courses and Classes ($168,151 : 

Geo. Coles. Ltd 92 50 

School of Nursing 36 00 

University Women's Club 39 65 

10. Books for loan to Extension students ($83,661 : 

Macmillan Co 22 66 

Musson Book Co 12 80 

Public School Publishing Co 11 29 

Accounts under $10 (71 36 91 

11. Office expenses ($3,990,701 : 

Stationery, printing, postage, supplies and incidentals ($3^05.70) : 

D. Gestetner (Canada) Ltd.. ink. paper and stencils 955 38 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. cabinets, desk, sections, etc 156 13 

Postage 430 .54 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection and rental.... 108 00 

Universitv Press, printing and stationery 1,401 80 

Accounts' under $10 (3t 20 95 

Sundry- disbursements bv Director: 

Carfare. $10: telegrams, etc.. $35.36; sundries. $7.07... 52 43 
Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $14.46; labour. $7.53; 

material. $58.48 80 47 

Extra clerical assistance: 

R. P. Brown. 52 weeks. 2 days 785 00 

$54,287 86 

Less credit 2 00 



(b) Publicity: 

1. Advertising and announcements ($1,480.90) : 

Albert College 

Canadian Association of Occupational Therapy. 

Canadian Churchman 

Canadian Comment 

Canadian Legion of the British Empire Leagues 

College Times 

Copp. Clark Co 

Dufferin School Old Boys" Association 

Educational Courier 

Evening Telegram 

Glebe Collegiate Institute 

Globe Printing Co 

Earl Haig Collegiate Institute 

Humberside Collegiate Institute 

Jar\'is Collegiate Institute 

Kitchener- Waterloo Collegiate Institute 



$54,285 86 


$10 00 


40 


00 


12 


00 


18 


00 


26 


25 


15 


00 


20 


00 


15 


00 


14 


00 


186 


90 


15 


00 


218 


75 


6 


00 


15 


00 


11 


00 


12 00 



278 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Lisgar Collegiate Institute 15 00 

Mail & Empire 231 05 

Ontario Educational Association 50 00 

Chitario School Trustees and Ratepayers' Association 25 00 

Peterborough Normal School Year Book 30 00 

Saturday Night 10 40 

Scarboro Collegiate Institute 12 00 

"The School," O. C. E 15 00 

Students' Administrative Council 10 00 

Toronto Daily Hebrew Journal 10 00 

Toronto Daily Star 187 55 

Toronto Normal School Year Book 12 00 

"The Twig" 11 00 

University College Literary and Athletic Society 25 00 

Accounts under $10 (28) 202 00 

2. Issue of University Bulletins, exhibits and other forms of publicity 
($2,169.61): 

Alumni Federation, reprints of the President's report, and 

inserts of supplements 377 73 

Canadian Press Clipping Service 55 00 

Photographic Service, negatives, plates and prints 38 70 

Postage 1,31000 

Rapid Grip & Batten Ltd., engraving 41 61 

University Press, printing and stationery 331 19 

Accounts under $10 (3) H 25 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $2.50; material, $1.63 4 13 

3. Travelling expenses of organizers and speakers: 

W. J. Dunlop 150 03 

$58,086 40 

Less credit from sale of bulletins, star maps, etc 1,261 34 



$56,825 06 
$73,412 56 



XVIII. RESIDENCES AND WOMEN'S UNION 
121. Men's Buildings 

(a) University (North, East and South Houses) : 

Heat and light S3,563 94 

Occasional fuel : 

Central Coal Co 60 85 

Water 150 61 

Caretaker's supplies ($311.80) : 

Electrolux Ltd., vacuum cleaner 63 36 

Superintendent's Dept., material 248 44 

Cleaning and house service ($6,603.89) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry- 475 85 

Baker Carpet Cleaning Co 10 85 

Superintendent's Dept , labour 6,117 19 

Repairs and renewals ($2,209.98) : . 

Art Window Shade Co., shades cleaned 57 69 

M. F. Calway, furniture repairs 41 00 

J. J. Heffron Bedding Co.. mattress and covers 35 26 

J. F. Smith, furniture repairs 15 00 

Accounts under $10 (3) 17 91 

Superintendent's Dept., key, 35c; labour, $1,539.34; material, 

$503.43 2,043 12 

Caretaker, G. W. L. Pratt, 12 mos. to 30 June, $1,350 — $28.75. . . 1,321 25 

$14,222 32 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant $3,563 94 

Credit for repairs, etc 193 33 

3,757 27 

(b) University College (No. 73 St. George Street) : 

Light $210 60 

Fuel ($629.28) : 

Central Coal Co 412 49 

Elias Rogers Co 216 79 



$10,465 05 



Il 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 279 

Gas. $9.68; water. 1137.98 147 66 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 118 02 

Cleaning and furnace man (§1.935.01* : 

.\llen Mfg. Co.. laundr>- 97 88 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 1,837 13 

Repairs and renewals ($613.20) : 

M. F. Cal way. furniture repairs 24 75 

J. J. Heffrom Bedding Co., mattresses snd covers 79 50 

Accounts under SIO (2) 5 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $425.98; material, $77.97 503 95 



Less light charged to Central Power Plant $210 60 

Credit for repairs 26 55 



$3,653 77 
237 15 



122. Women's Buildings 
Maintenance: 

Whitney Hall: 

Heat and light $4,573 56 

Fuel (S149.76) : 

Central Coal Co 136 86 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 12 90 

Gas, $373.65 ; water. $525.07 898 72 

Repairs and renewals ($2,290.10) : 

John Inglis Co.. boiler tubes 18 02 

Refrigeration Service Co., repairs 67 40 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 27 35 

Accounts under $10 (4) 20 92 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $1,740.06; material. $416.35 2.156 41 

Furnace and boiler man: 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 342 16 

$8,254 30 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant 4,573 56 

92 and 94 St. George Street: 

Fuel ($732.99): 

Central Coal Co $711 24 

Ellas Rogers Co 21 50 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 25 

Gas. $38.04; electric current. $111.24; water. $49.13 19S 41 

Repairs and renewals ($586.87) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son. shades and repairs 4 86 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 22 80 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $448.27; material, $110.94.. 559 21 

Furnace and boiler man: 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 133 50 

49 St. George Street: 

Fuel ($476.19) : 

Elias Rogers Co $200 27 

Central Coal Co 274 51 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 1 41 

Gas. $22.48: electric current. $162; water. $33.54 218 02 

Repairs and renewals ($424.23) : 

Accounts under $10 (3) 3 77 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $269.64; material. $150.82.. 420 46 

Furnace and boiler man: 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 76 54 

University College Women's Union: 

Heat' and light $1.0,59 52 

Gas, $111.10; water. $63.49 174 59 

Repairs and renewals ($1,067.61) : 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 16 85 

Accounts under $10 (3) 7 79 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $644.42; material. $398.55.. 1.042 97 



$3,416 62 
$13,881 67 



$3,680 74 



$1,651 77 



$1,194 98 



280 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Connection to Central Power Plant: 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. S504.09; material, $695.48.. 1,199 57 

Caretaker. Leo Cole. 12 mos. to 30 June. 81,350 — $28.75 1,321 25 



i 



$4,822 54 
Less hear and light charged to Central Power Plant 1,059 52 



123. Housekeeping Account. Women's Buildings 
(a) Whitney Hall: 

Provisions and housekeeping expenses (123,440.56) : 

Acme Farmers' Dairy $2,092 12 

B. Amodeo & Son. fruit and vegetables 3,104 37 

Arcade Florists, flowers 71 10 

H. J. Ash, fruit and vegetables 402 14 

Jas. Bamford & Sons, fruit 43 30 

Barkers Bread 61 52 

Belle-Ewart Co., ice 65 10 

Betty's Ltd.. preserves 23 94 

Bi-a-cake Food Shop. c£ikes 19 41 

J. Blood, meat and provisions 22 22 

Bowes Ltd.. fruit and nuts 206 13 

Bredin"s Ltd., bread 56 70 

Canada Bread Co 407 66 

Canada Dry Ginger Ale 80 25 

Canada Packers Ltd., meat 4,107 14 

Christie. Brown & Co., biscuits 116 56 

City Dairy, ice cream, etc 637 17 

Geo. Coles Ltd.. cakes and confectionery 59 09 

Daily Brand Co., preserves 90 44 

Dariform Cheese Co., cream cheese 26 00 

T. Eaton Co., provisions, etc 23 76 

lohn J. Fee, eggs and butter 231 72 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson, disbursements: 

Flowers. $10.04; provisions and sundries, $17.90; meals 

allowance for staff outside of regular Session, $38 65 94 

S. A. Frost. Christmas decorations 12 00 

Grimsby Pickle Co 28 40 

A. Guiness & Co.. doilies 19 20 

\^'. Haeberlin. cakes 11 22 

Miss F. Hahn, honey 43 20 

Samuel Harris, meat 1.340 22 

H. J. Heinz Co., canned goods 132 94 

Harrv Home Co.. jelly powder and provisions 43 03 

J. G.' Hume, apples 26 80 

F. Hunnisett, Jr., meat 407 04 

Hunt's Ltd.. confectionery 65 61 

Ideal Bread Co 563 16 

Interlake Tissue Mills Co.. napkins, etc 47 00 

W. S. Johnston & Co., printing lunch tickets 26 50 

Kraft Distributors. Ltd.. cheese, etc % 17 

S. Lightfoot & Son, fruit and vegetables 16 20 

Loblaw Groceterias, provisions 1,724 09 

Jas. Lumbers Co., groceries 977 54 

>rcCormick Mfg. Co.. biscuits 238 29 

D. Mclnt>-re Co., fish 288 21 

Maclver Co. meat 731 03 

McLaren's Ltd.. olives 32 05 

M. P. Mallon. poultr>- 516 42 

Maple Leaf Milling Co.. flour 21 90 

National Grocers Ltd., provisions 2,376 43 

"^'m. Neilson Ltd.. ice cream 547 92 

Ontario Honev Producers, honey 28 10 

Purity Bread Co 169 30 

J. M. Schneider, meat 122 58 

Shirriffs Ltd., jelly powder, etc 152 55 

Jas. Smith, confectionery 13 11 

M. J. Smith, vegetables 97 30 

Stewart-Le Grice Ltd.. candles 22 40 

Swift Canadian Co., meat 10 24 



$3,763 02 
$10,290 51 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



281 



Watson Food Products 

Edward Webb & Sons, paper flowers 

F. Wells, poultry 

Geo. W eslon Ltd.. biscuits 

Geo. Weston Bread & Cake Co., bread 

\STiite's Fish Co 

G. H. Wood & Co.. doilies 

Accounts under 810 (8 1 

Qeaning and house service ($14,366.77) : 

Berkel Products Co.. repairs 

T. Eaton Co., cleaning supplies, etc 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson, sundry disbursements 

Langley's Ltd.. curtains and rugs cleaned 

Melrose Window Cleaners 

Dr. Gwen Mulock. medical examination of maids 

Parisian Laundry 

Accounts under §10 ( 3 ) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $480.70; material. S615.10 

Pay lists, wages of maids, etc 

Furnishings and sundr\' renewals < $1,553.47) : 

W. G, Atkins, renovating furniture 

Cassidy's Ltd., dishes and glassware 

Crescent Plating Co.. plating 

Cutten-Foster & Sons, cloth 

Dustbane Products Ltd.. waxing and polishing machine, , , 

T, Eaton Co.. utensils, linens, etc 

Robt. Simpson Co.. blankets, etc.. desk and silverware.... 

Wrought Iron Range Co.. pans, etc 

Ascounts under $10 ( 5 ) 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $27,32; material, $130.58, 
Piano: 

Heintzman & Co.. tuning 

Staff salaries (additional to Dean of Women charged 
under University College General ) : 

Dietitians (with living valued (ft $400 each) : 

Miss J. Barber. 12 mos.. S1.700 — $37.50 

Miss V. R. Murphy. 10 mos.. Sl.OOO — $20, . . . 

Housekeeper-Nurse. Mme. J. Ledoux, 12 mos. (with 
living valued (a $400) Sl.OOO — $20 

Secretarv-Hostess. Mrs. L. R. Howard. 12 mos. 

(with 'living valued f(i $400) $1,000 — $20 980 00 



11.662 50 
980 00 

980 00 



65 


75 


11 


00 


78 54 


100 


00 


152 42 


12 33 


20 30 


38 


29 


15 


20 


88 


35 


30 


96 


362 


21 


54 00 


22 


50 


938 


28 


14 03 


1.095 


80 


1,745 44 


305 


50 


55 


71 


11 


00 


11 


13 


175 


50 


209 80 


530 75 


77 


74 


18 44 


157 


90 



22 50 



charged as follows: 

Whitney Hall $3,671 50 

94 St, George St 147 00 

49 St. George St 147 00 

Women's Union 637 00 



$4,602 50 



Less credit from students" damages, etc. 



(b) 94 St. George Street: 

Cleaning and house service ($1,637.16) : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 

T. Eaton Co.. cleaning supplies, etc 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson, sundry- disbursements 

Heintzman & Co,, tuning piano 

Langleys Ltd.. rugs cleaned 

Toronto Window Cleaning Co 

Meals for Resident Head 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $21.45; material, $102.97 

Pay lists, wages of maids, etc 

Furnishings and sundry renewals ($308.50) : 

EJectrolux Ltd.. vacuum cleaner 

Lyons Bedding & Upholstering Co.. mattresses 

Robt. Simpson Co., blankets, etc 

Accounts under $10 (2) 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. 90c; labour. $6.14; material. 

$52.14 

Share of salaries detailed under W hitney Hall 



3.671 50 



$43,054 80 




254 50 






$42,800 30 




$145 84 




14 71 




21 65 




5 00 




43 91 




16 00 




144 00 




124 42 




1.121 63 




67 40 




87 00 




81 72 




13 20 




59 18 




147 00 






12,092 66 



282 R EPORT OF THE No. 12 

(c) 49 St. George Street: 

Cleaning and house service ($894.52) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundn' 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson, sundry disbursements 

Langley's Ltd., chairs and rugs cleaned 

Accounts under $10 (3) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $2.72; material, $31.37 

Pay lists, wages of maids, etc 

Furnishings and sundry renewals ($134.71) : 

.\ikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 

John Kay Co., rugs 

Lyons Bedding & Upholstering Co., mattress 

Robt. Simpson Co., bed 

John Smith, upholstering, etc 

Superintendent's Dept. material 

Share of salaries detailed under Whitney Hall 

(d) University College Women's Union: 
Cleaning and house service ($2,798.55) : 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson, sundry disbursements 

Langley's Ltd.. drapes and rugs cleaned 

Melrose Window Cleaners , 

Parisian Laundry 

Accounts under $10 (71 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $52.25; material, $270.71. 

Pay lists, wages of maids, etc 

Furnishings and sundr)' renewals ($602.06) : 

Cassidy's Ltd.. china and glassware 

Crescent Plating Co., plating 

T. Eaton Co., table linen, etc 

Robt. Simpson Co.. curtains and silverware, etc 

Wrought Iron Range Co., utensils 

Accounts under $10 (4) 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $13.60; material, $51.96.. 
Piano, magazines, etc. ($45.38) : 

T. Eaton Co.. magazines 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson, sundry disbursements 

Heintzman & Co.. tuning and repairs 

Infirmarv service ($48.16) : 

T. Eaton Co.. hot water bottles and medical supplies 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson, sundry disbursements 

Office supplies ($83.31) : 

T. Eaton Co., memo pads, ink and refills 

Postage 

Bobbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 2 ) 

Share of salaries detailed under Whitney Hall 



XIX. 124. CENTRAL POWER PLANT 

Fuel ($79,778.23) : 

British American Oil Co $110 00 

Cities Service Oil Co 172 00 

McColl-Frontenac Oil Co 110 10 

Standard Fuel Co 79,372 36 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 13 77 

Hydro-Electric current. $26.520.11 ; water, $503.79 27,023 90 

Repairs and renewals, engineers' supplies and miscellaneous items 
($13,358.19) : 

-Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 20 32 

Babcock-Wilcox & Goldie-McCulloch, boiler parts 166 82 

Bailey Meter Co., meter 19 32 

Beldam's Asbestos Packing Ltd, sheet rubber 116 54 

Canadian Allis-Chalmers Ltd., plumbing supplies and springs 23 21 

Canadian Charts & Supplies, charts and ink 40 16 

Canadian General Electric Co., repairs to steam turbine 2,003 85 



$73 52 


22 


25 


30 


31 


17 45 


34 09 


716 90 


38 


22 


30 


75 


4 35 


15 


25 


21 


00 


25 


14 


147 


00 




$1 176 9^ 






$29 71 


119 


78 


15 


00 


156 48 


30 


15 


322 


% 


2,124 47 


143 


07 


12 


50 


116 


99 


225 


22 


16 


13 


22 


59 


65 56 


16 


88 


5 


00 


23 


50 


24 


70 


23 46 


7 


87 


27 


00 


16 80 


29 45 


2 


19 


637 


00 




S4. 914 d/i 








$50,283 65 




$74,455 83 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



283 



Canadian Gasket Co.. gaskets 29 46 

Canadian National Carbon Co.. parts and batteries 80 71 

Darling Bros., filter cloths 15 90 

Dearborn Chemical Co.. treatments 469 87 

Dominion Carbon Brush Co., brushes 10 53 

Dominion Wheel Foundries Ltd 270 62 

Foster & Wheeler Ltd.. bricks, grate bars and furnace parts 2,320 56 

Oarlock Packing Co.. packing 181 79 

Lagonda Mfg. Co.. cutters 16 25 

T. McAvity & Sons, safety valve 30 78 

McColl-Frontenac Oil Ltd.. oil 447 79 

W. R. McKee. meter repairs 10 35 

Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., valves and repairs 75 99 

Neptune National Meters Ltd.. meters 89 04 

Robinson Clay Products, bricks 107 57 

Smart Turner Machine Co.. pump repairs 19 08 

G. F. Sterne & Sons, cement 135 87 

E. M. Tozer. crushing brick, etc 14 00 

University Press, stationery 13 84 

Accounts under $10 (4) ..'. 26 55 

Advertising for coal tenders 49 14 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $15.72; labour, $4,453.28; material, 

$2,083.28 6,552 28 

Engineers, assistant engineers, firemen and trimmers ($19,128.46) : 

Chief Engineer. C. S. Moseley, 12 mos. to 30 June, $2,900 — $72 .. . 2,828 00 
Assistant engineers Ca $120 to $150 per month: 

L. McMiaster. $1,800 — $40; overtime. $3.03 1.763 03 

W. Smith, $1,800 — $40 1,760 00 

A. McHugh. $1,620 — $35.50 1,584 50 

S. Simpson. $1,440 — $31 ; overtime. $3.88 1,412 88 

Firemen @ $105 to $107 per month: 

Sundry persons 5.909 61 

Trimmers, boiler cleaners and pump attendants @ $90 to $117.50 per 
month: 

Sundry persons 3.870 44 

$139,288 78 

Less sale of cinders, etc 106 40 



$139,182 38 



XX. MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL 

125. Central Stores 

Storekeeper, C. A. Johnston, 12 mos.. $1,800 — $40 $1,760 00 

Assistant Storekeeper, S. Tipping. 12 mos., $1,050 — $21.25 1,028 75 

Clerk. Miss J. H. Bemrose. 12 mos., $1,050 — $21.25 1,028 75 

Heat and light 190 40 

$4,007 90 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant 190 40 

126. Grounds 

Foreman Gardener. R. R. Corbett. 12 mos.. $1,700 — $37.50 $1,662 50 

Lighting account 416 32 

Labour, gravel, roadways, granolithic walks, flowers, shrubs and general 
expenses ($15,028.32) : 

F. Atkinson, hay 17 74 

R. B. Bambridge, repairs to truck 45 77 

Builders' Supplies Ltd 26 04 

Central Coal Co., fuel 20 20 

City Treasurer, water rates, $92.64; repairs to pipe and pavement, 

$56.55 149 19 

Colas Roads Ltd.. road binding compound 54 27 

Connaught Laboratories, oats 27 32 

Jos. Hampson. concrete sand 13 50 

Lumb & Little, painting pole 25 00 

McKay Cut Stone, stone 34 00 

B. W. Miller & Co., plants 243 03 

Morey Coal & Coke Co., fuel 12 (X) 



$3,817 50 



2M REPORT OF THE No. 12 

P. Mulholland. hay 31 32 

North American Cyanamid Ltd., plant food 240 80 

J. Robert Page, repairs to pavement 225 00 

Provincial Treasurer, truck license 48 00 

Ramsay Contracting Co.. pavement 671 94 

Hugh Reid, horse-shoeing 42 80 

Sheridan Nurseries, plants 32 00 

Toronto Elevator Co., feed 50 04 

W. P. Warner Co.. sod 167 20 

Accounts under $10 ( 7 ) 33 33 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $11,506.58; material, $1,311.25 12,817 83 



$17,107 14 



Less light charged to Central Power Plant $416 32 

Credit for cartage 112 88 

529 20 



127. Protective Service 

Pay of Constables and Nightwatchmen ($15,631.17) : 
Constables: 

R. D'Arcy, 12 mos., $1,950 — $43.75 $1,906 25 

W. J. Scott, 12 mos.. $1,550 — $33.75 1,516 25 

H. V. Spence, 12 mos., $1,500 — $32.50 1,467 50 

C. Scruby. 9 mos.. $945 — $19.87 ( see also below) 925 13 

Nightwatchmen : 

J. Kirkwood. 12 mos., $1,320 — $28 1,292 00 

A. Smith. 11 mos., 18 nights, $1,278.64 — $28 1,250 64 

W. A. Evans. 12 mos., $1,260 — $26.50 1,233 50 

W. N. Lotto. 12 mos.. $1,260 — $26.50 1,233 50 

W. Hunter, 12 mos., $1,200 — $25 1,175 00 

J. C. Smith, 12 mos., $1,200 — $25 1,175 00 

W. Gordon, 10 mos., 17 nights, $1,100.53 — $26.50 1.074 03 

A. R. Endersley, 9 mos., 17 nights 870 00 

C. Scruby, 3 mos., $315 — $6.63 308 37 

W. Davis, 68 nights 204 00 

Uniforms, clocks, dials, etc. ($262.37) : 

Harding Bros., repairs to clocks 98 50 

Onlario Tailoring Co., tunics and coat 57 00 

University Press, printing and stationery 28 89 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $55.21 : material, $22.77 77 98 



128. Telephones 

Bell Telephone Co., service to 30 June $11,992 84 

Less receipts from sub-services $3,230 66 

residences 7.54 00 

slot machines 71 16 

4,055 82 



Switchboard operators ($3,574.90) : 

Mrs. J. Hoddinott. 12 mos., $1,040 — $21 

Miss M. Crawford, 12 mos., 3 days. $944.25 — $18.72 

Miss N. Rowberry, 12 mos., 3 days, $892.25 — $17.68 

Relief: 

Miss V. Covert , 

Miss M. Maher , 

Miss M. Durie 

Miss J. Philpott 

Miss K. Glenday 

Miss E. Raddagh 

Miss A. McHale 

129. Insurance 
Fire: 

Balance of premiums on general Schedule brought forward from 

1934-35 and chargeable to 1935-36 $15,770 27 

Casual premiums: 

Economics Building: 

AEtna Insurance Co 117 49 

General Accident, Fire & Life Assurance Corporation 136 29 



$7,937 02 


1.019 00 


925 53 


874 57 


289 45 


206 25 


104 40 


82 50 


37 80 


22 80 


12 60 



$16,577 94 



$15,893 54 



$11,511 92 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



285 



Guardian Insurance Co 94 00 

Stadium Grandstand and Bleachers: 

North British & Mercantile Insurance Co 825 00 

Botanical Field Laboratory: 

Home Insurance Co 25 00 

Accounts under $25 ( 3 ) 34 32 

Burglary and Hold-up: 

Dominion of Canada General Insurance Co 344 44 

Automobiles: 

Dominion of Canada General Insurance Co., University-owned cars. 

$149.60 ; non-ownership coverage, $160 309 60 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission: 

Permit and inspection fee 50 00 

Canadian Bank of Commerce: 

One year's charge for guarantee re safekeeping of securities 150 00 

$17,856 41 
Less rebates on cancelled policies 22 46 

$17,833 95 

130. Law Costs 

Hamilton Cassels, K.C., taxed costs as Solicitor to the University $807 50 

Registrar of Deeds for Toronto, fee for registration of conveyance of the 

old McMaster University property 200 00 

$1,007 50 

131. Auditor's Fees 

Clarkson, Gordon, Dilworth and Nash, annual remuneration $3,000 00 



132. Travelling Expenses 

President and Academic Staff ($1,463.77) : 

President H. J. Cody $63 65 

G. S. Brett 32 00 

G. W. Brown 33 33 

A. R. Cleghorn 50 00 

E. H. Craigie 50 00 

H. J. Davis 28 24 

C. W. M. Hart 50 00 

C. D. Howe 61 55 

N. A. M. Mackenzie 50 00 

A. D. A. Mason 50 00 

E. S. Moore 50 00 

J. L. Synge 50 00 

Ellis Thomson 40 00 

T. L. Walker 38 55 

J. O. Wilhelm 100 00 

R. W. Angus 40 00 

Miss J. Brodie 55 00 

J. Lea Gate 35 00 

C. A. Corrigan 50 00 

D. G. Creighton 40 88 

H. E. Ford 36 75 

J. Houpert 45 00 

H. L. Humphreys 37 90 

Chester Martin 33 34 

T. J. Meek 70 00 

E. S. Ryerson 54 93 

W. R. Taylor 43 00 

E. M. Walker 100 00 

M. W. Wallace 24 65 

F. W. Winnett .50 00 

Out-of-Town Members of the Senate ($646,951 : 

Judge J. S. Campbell 64 00 

Dr. G. R. Cruickshank .52 .50 

J. H. Hardy 16 35 

Dr. C. D. McGilvray 45 85 

Dr. C. D. Parfitt 14 85 

Dr. J. B. Reynolds 47 20 

W. L. Sprung 46 00 

A. R. Walker 70 70 



286 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



24 


15 


21 


25 


7 


90 


88 


60 


90 00 


37 


95 


19 65 



Dr. J. H. Coyne. . . . 

W. J. Deadman 

P. A. C. Ketchum.. 
Dr. T. M. Mulligan 
Col. W. N. Ponton. 
H. S. Robertson . . . . 
L. F. Stephens 



133. Receptions to Societies and University Visitors 

Expenses re sundry public lectures: 

Prof. F. Baldenspeiger $50 00 

Dr. E. H. Fellows 75 00 

Richard Finnic 30 00 

Prof. R. H. Fowler 20 00 

Prof. K. Kuratowski 25 00 

Dean C. H. Mitchell 42 50 

Major F. J. Ney for Miss M. Gullan 50 00 

Prof. H. Ries 33 57 

Dr. Ludwig Silberstein 100 00 

Prof. C. R. Young 32 50 

Sir Alfred E. Zimmern 50 00 

Meeting of Association of American Medical Colleges 295 21 

Entertainment of American Astronomical Association 48 40 

Catering on sundry occasions: 

Hart House: President's luncheons and dinners, $318.01; sundry 

guests, $10.40; lantern service, $5.44 333 85 

York Club, luncheon to the Governor-General 176 35 

University College Women's Union: Dinner for Students' Adminis- 
trative Council. $29; tea for Prof. F. Baldenspeiger, $15.90 M "0 

Geo. Coles Ltd.. reception for Ontario Educational Association 125 00 

Robt. Simpson Co.. reception for Graduates in Social Science 30 00 

134. Convocation Expenses 

Hoods, gowns, printing programmes, invitations, etc.: 

Harcourt & Sons, hoods and gowns $232 00 

University Press, priming and stationery 278 81 

Mrs. A. Yates, caretaker's overtime services 2 50 

135. Aid to Publications and Societies 

Alumni Federation. University of Toronto Monthly $1,500 00 

Royal Astronomical Society 1 50 00 

Royal Society of Canada 400 00 

Universities Bureau of the British Empire 2"8 86 

British School of Archaeology. Jerusalem 100 00 

American School of Oriental Research, Jerusalem 100 00 

American School of Oriental Research, Bagdad ]00 00 

Association of American Universities 50 00 

Society for Promotion of Engineering Education 15 38 

Students' Administrative Council (re student lodgings) 100 00 

136. Bursaries 
Awards to sundry students: 

Faculty of Arts $8,220 00 

Faculty of Medicine 2.5.'>'^ 00 

.School of Graduate Studies 85 00 

$10.8.30 00 

Less portion charged to Medical Society donation 1,100 00 

137. Contingencies 

Librarv Buildinc Addition, Mathers & Haldenby. preparation of sketches 

for future addition $1,000 00 

Central Power Plnnt Addition, report by Angus & Watson on enlargement 500 00 

Canadian Bank of Commerce, charge re registration of securities 15 00 

Chartered Trust & Executor Co., commission on collection of postponed 

fees of students 69 54 

Dunlop's Ltd., flowers for funerals 39 50 



$2,110 72 



$1,562 28 



$513 31 



$2,814 24 



$9,730 00 



12 


00 


116 34 


101 


00 


56 


18 


22 


36 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 287 

Remembrance Day Committee, wreath for Tower Memorial Service 

Roll of Service, supplement to the Roll of Honour 

Robt. Simpson Co., mourning decorations on death of His Majesty King 

George V 

University Press, address to His Majesty King Edward VHI 

Accounts under $10 (4) 

Workmen's Compensation: 

Workmen's Compensation Board, to cover allowances paid to 

employees 699 84 

Medical services for injured employees, etc.: 

Toronto General Hospital 

Dr. Roy H. Thomas , 

Sundry doctors (5) 



XXI. 138. CAPITAL ACCOUNT CHARGES 

Accountant, Supreme Court of Ontario, twenty-seventh 

annual payment on debenture issue of 1909 $25,260 00 

Less portion charged to Ontario College of Education 10,000 00 



87 75 

117 70 

47 00 


$2,884 21 




$89,257 11 



S15.260 00 
Accountant, Supreme Court of Ontario, twenty-first annual payment on 

debenture issue of 1915 re Hart House 5,975 00 

Accountant, Supreme Court of Ontario, twelfth annual payment on 

debenture issue of 1924 re Forestry Building " 10,000 00 

Toronto General Hospital, twenty-fifth annual payment on debenture 

issue of 1911 re grant to Toronto General Hospital 15,157 00 

Toronto General Hospital, twenty-fifth annual payment on debenture 

issue of 1911 re old Pathological Building 6,568 00 

University of Toronto (Rockefeller Endowment — Medicine) seventh 

annual payment on debenture issue of 1929 re Banting Institute 64,193 00 

Royal College of Dental Surgeons, interest on liability of $50,000 2,500 00 



$119,653 00 



XXII. SPECIAL RESEARCH 

139. Department \L Appropriations 
(a) Arts: 
Biology : 

Research Assistants: 

Miss H. M. Stevens. 8 mos $600 00 

L. Butler, 11 mos 570 00 

W. H. Johnson, 8 mos 450 00 

Mrs. E. Kuitunen, 8 mos 400 00 

D. A. MacLulich, 8 mos 400 00 

Wen-chun Ho, 8 mos 300 00 

A. \*k ilkes, 8 mos 300 00 

A. N. Langford, 1 month ( paid also $525 in Dept. of Botany 

and $170 in Special Research, Botany I '. 40 00 

Assistant in Vivarium, D'Arcy LeRay, 12 mos. (o $520, of which 

$250 charged to department 270 00 

Expenses ($475.36) : 

W. L. Behan, meals and board at Algonquin Park for 

workers 

Crabtree-Miller Ltd., line cuts 

E. C. Cross, travelling expenses, $18; gas regulator, $21.40 

Mrs. E. Kuitunen, travelling expenses 

W. R. McKee, repairs to apparatus 

D. A. MacLulich, travelling expenses 

Maple Leaf Milling Co., flour and feed 

Ontario Agricultural College, eggs 

Richards Glass Co., tubes 

Ward's Natural Science Establishment, insect nets 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (19) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Food supplies, $34.18; seeds. $12.34; sundries, $13.48. 
Superintendent's Dept., labour, $29.02; material, $10.82.. 



19 


90 


11 


94 


) 39 


40 


38 


19 


10 


20 


75 00 


18 87 


17 


20 


n 


50 


11 


13 


19 84 


102 


35 


60 00 


39 84 


$3,805 36 



288 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Fisheries Research: 

Research Assistants: 

R. R. Langford. 12 mos.. $900 — $18.00 $882 00 

F. E. J. Fry. 3 mos.. $225 — $4.50 (paid also $881.40 in 

department) 220 50 

W. A. Kennedy. 1 month 80 00 

K. H. Doan. 1 month (paid also $40 in department) 60 00 

Expenses ($2,699.36) : 

W. J. K. Harkness, disbursements: 

Provisions. $323.39; payments to help. $95.50; lumber 
supplies, $158.86; travelling and hotel expenses, 
$397.34; beat service, $139.81; baggage transfer, 
$8.20; freight and express, $209.59; hardware, 

$72.84 ; sundries. $80.80 

J. T. Arnold, car trailer 

Canada Veiling Co.. net 

Mrs. M. Coleman, rental of cottage and equipment. 

Algonquin Park 

Wm. & J. T. Greey Ltd.. bolting cloth and wire mesh 

Holliday Flint Glass Works, vials and corks 

Imperial Oil Ltd.. drums 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals, etc 

Jack Leckie Ltd.. tents, nets, rope, etc 

National Motors Ltd.. used truck 

W. E. Ricker. honorarium for preparation and delivery of 

Manual Statistical Procedure. Aquatic Biology 

Robt. Simpson Co.. outboard motor 

Watercraft Equipment Co., repairs to motor 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (6) 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $18.97; labour. $6.07; 

material. $19.24 44 28 



Botany: 

Honorary- Research Associate. John Dearness (without salary) 
Research Associate. L. C. Coleman, 12 mos.. $1,000 — $20... 
Research Assistants: 

A. J. V. Lehmann. 4 mos.. $290 — $1.60. 

L. 0. Weaver. 4 mos 

J. W. Groves. 3% mos 

D. H. Hamly. 3 mos.. $200 — $1.50. . . 

W. K. W. Baldwin. 3 mos.. p^jj 

Miss R. P. Biggs. 3 mos ; also in 

R. G. H. Cormack, 3 mos department 

A. N. Langford. 3 mos 

D. C. MIcPherson, 3 mos 

M. W. Bannan. 2 mos 

Miss A. B. Brodie. 2 mos 

Miss D. F. Forward. 2 mos ' 

F. E. Tomalin. 11 mos 

N. W. Radforth. 3 mos.. 30 hours (paid also $80 in Biology 
and $50 for Extension Work) .- 

R. E. Fitzpatrick. 2 mos 

Miss L. M. Hunter, 180 hours @ 50c 

K. M. Mayall. 100 hours fa 50c 

Miss S. Taylor. 1 month (paid also $35 in Biology) 

C. N. Haldenby, 1 month 

Expenses ($513.21) : 

W. E. Booth Co.. films and plates 

Cambridge University Press, reprints 

Canadian Liquid Air Co., rental of cylinders and gas 

Central Scientific Co.. balance and counting apparatus 

R. H. Chappell. glassbl owing 

Eastman Kodak Stores, chemicals, films, slides and paper. . 

Gevaert Co. of America, lantern plates 

C. S. Hanes. apparatus 

Lancaster Press, reprints 

May Oil Burner Ltd.. furnace parts 

"Mycologia," reprints 

Prof. R. B. Thomson, sundry travelling expenses, members 
of staff 



.486 


33 


30 


00 


18 


75 


100 00 


39 


20 


20 


00 


18 65 


24 50 


311 


19 


280 00 


100 00 


73 80 


43 39 


71 


96 


37 


31 



$980 00 



288 40 


230 00 


205 00 


198 50 


170 00 


170 00 


170 00 


170 00 


170 00 


120 00 


110 00 


110 00 


370 00 


150 00 


120 00 


90 00 


50 00 


30 00 


25 00 


24 99 


22 72 


27 83 


54 97 


15 80 


49 45 


10 78 


97 28 


33 50 


19 61 


10 08 



?,747 22 



25 30 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 2^ 

Wickcrsham Printing Co.. reprints 10 49 

Accounts under $10 (13) 49 82 

Superintendent's Dcpt., labour. $44.93; material, $15.66... 60 59 



$4,440 11 

Less credit for gas tax 17 04 

(b) Medicine: 
Bio-Chemistry: 

Research Assistants (each 2 months) : 

B. F. Crocker (paid also $1,271.50 in department) $200— $4 $196 00 

V. Ignatieff (paid also $1,027.75 in department) $200 — $4 1% 00 

S. Cohen (paid also $450 in department ) 100 00 

L. Farber. $100 — $2 98 00 

Experimental Medical Research: 

Chief Technical Assistant. W. Cowan. 12 mos. (paid also bonus 
of $50 from each of Medical Research. Banting, and Dept. of 

Surgery) $1,700— $37.50 $1,662 50 

Head of Animal Quarters. J. Minshull. 12 mos 600 00 

Assistants. Animal Quarters, each 12 mos.: 

G. Parkes 720 00 

A. W. Booth 660 00 

Cyril Lee 660 00 

Expenses (2,045.91) : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 103 67 

Jos. Cooper Ltd. meat 90 22 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd.. laboratory uniforms 21 13 

E. Cullen. animals 469 80 

Guaranteed Exterminating Co 40 00 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals, syringes, etc 297 90 

Kelley Feed & Seed Co.. feed 71 38 

Langley. Harris Co.. dog biscuits 110 00 

John McGillian. carrots 55 80 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, ether 23 76 

Maple Leaf Milling Co.. feed 132 76 

Ralston. Purina Co.. feed 394 06 

E. H. Stanners. sawdust 11 25 

Accounts under $10 (4 ) 19 95 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $15.60; material. $188.63.. 204 23 

$6,348 41 

Less credit from sale of animals and feed 499 80 

$5,848 61 

Charged to Dunlap Bequest $5,370 90 

Charged to Reeve Bequest 477 71 

$5,848 61 

(c) Applied Science: 

Chemical Engineering: 

Research Assistants, each 3 mos. (paid also in department) : 

G. T. Eaton $450 00 

W. H. Rapson 450 00 

W. H. Bowman 350 00 

G. V. Jansen 350 00 

Engineering Physics: 

Machinist. C. T. Harding. 9.28 weeks (a $30 (see also 

department) 278 50 

Expenses ($206.02) : 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., glass parts 92 00 

Henry Disston & Son 10 92 

Accounts under $10 (5) 19 66 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $57.54; material. $25.90 83 44 

Mechanical Engineering: 

Expenses ($82.93) : 

University Press, book 7 25 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 75 68 

Mining Enginering: 

Research Assistants ^i $125 per month: 

W. D. Brittain. 4 mos.. 22 days 591 66 

A. S. Drummond, 2 mos., 8 days 283 34 



$4,423 07 



$590 00 



290 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Expenses ($225* : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 11 04 

Lnited Steel Corporation, chain and bore 31 00 

Accounts under $10 (5) 17 59 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $130.96; material, $34.41.. 165 37 

$3,267 45 

Charged to Wallberg Bequest 3,267 45 

(d) Dentistry: 

Professor of Pcriodontology, H. K. Box, 12 mos., $3,000 — $75 $2,925 00 

Laborator>' Technician, A. F. Fenton, 12 mos. (paid also $12 for 

Post Graduate Courses ) $1,000 — $20 960 00 



— $3,905 00 



140. Banti-ng and Best Resrakch 
(a) Banting Research: 

Professor of Research in Medicine, Sir Frederick Banting, 12 mos.. . $5,000 00 

Associate Professor. D. A. Irwin, 12 mos., $3,600 — $99 3,501 00 

Assistant Professors, each 12 mos.: 

W. R. Franks, $3,400 — $91 3,309 00 

C. C. Lucas, $3,000 — $75 2.925 00 

Research Associates: 

G. E. Hall, 12 mos.. $2,500 — $60 2,440 00 

J. T. Fallon, 12 mos., $2,160 — $49.80 2,110 20 

Miss S. Gaims, 12 mos., $2,160 — $49.80 2.110 20 

G. Ettinger, 3 mos. (^i $4,500 per annum, $1,125 — $33.75 1,091 25 

Research Assistants: 

Miss J. M, Lang, 12 mos., $1,400 — $30 1,370 00 

B. C. Coles, 12 mos., $1,200 — $25 1,175 00 

Miss ^L M. Shaw, 12 mos., $1,200 — $25 1,175 00 

Miss M. E. Dolan, 12 mos., $1,080 — $22 1.0.58 00 

Miss A. J. Watt, IOV2 mos., $787.50 — $15.75 771 75 

G. W. Manning, 9 mos 675 00 

Miss H. Williams. 81/1. mos 637 50 

H. H. Bindon, 8 mos 500 00 

J. E. Goodwin, 4Vj mos 337 50 

F. L. Lawson, 4 mos 300 00 

K. Greer, 3 mos 150 00 

G. Watts, 3 mos 150 00 

B. Schachter, 2 Vj mos 125 00 

H. Davidson, 1 month 75 OO 

B. Seaton, 1 month 75 00 

P. T. Greenberg. 1 month 50 00 

Research Fellows: 

E. L. Outhouse, 12 mos., $1,800 — $40 1.760 00 

: H. J. Creech. 10 mos., $900 — $18 882 00 

A. Duncan. 10 mos 750 00 

F. H. Lawford, 10 mos 750 00 

L. B. McPherson, 10 mos 750 00 

Keith Watson. 10 mos • 750 00 

Lome D. Proctor. 4 mos. (paid also $250 in Pathological 

Chemistry ) $400 — $6.25 3^3 75 

J. J. Rae. 3 mos 300 00 

Technicians, each 12 mos.: 

L. C. Brock. $1,320 — $28 (bonus for extra work $50) 1.342 00 

H. Douglas. $1.200 — $25 1.175 00 

J. Coniev. $1,080 — $22 1.058 00 

T. Walker. $1,080 — $22 1,0.58 00 

Miss G. Mulholland 6'=.0 00 

Miss N. Davy 600 00 

Secretarial Assistant, Miss M. J. Millar, 12 mos., $1,080 — $22 1.058 00 

Cleaner, Mrs. Allison Moffitt. 12 mos. (part time) 600 00 

$44,998 15 
Expenses ($10,867.41) : 

Acton Tool & Stamping Co., chassis and cover 15 60 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 20S 22 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 248 56 

American Journal of Cancer, subscription 10 53 

Art Metropole, microscope and refractometer 356 14 

F. Broom, meat, etc 45 40 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 291 



Burke Electric & X-Ray Co., tubes a7 9« 

Cambridge Instrument Co.. filter, etc fl ct 

Canadian General Electric Co., vacuum tube 16 55 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. chemicals 11 04 

Canadian Kodak Co., chemicals ^ nl 

Canadian Medical Association, reprints T^ o^ 

Canadian Westinghouse Co.. battery charger lo 95 

Carswell Co., books JO l" 

Walter A. Carveth & Co., instruments, etc »U» 4i 

Central Scientific Co., chemicals, glassware, etc ^7 9A 

Corbett-Cowlev Ltd.. laboratory coals • • • 97 26 

W. Cowan. Technical Assistant, Medical Research, bonus for 

extra services ^ J^ 

E. Cullen. animals ^o S 

Eastman Kodak Co.. photographic supplies ino lo 

T. Eaton Co.. grinder, motor and pulleys, etc 00 04 

Gevaert Co. of America, plates o'l -t 

Giles, Rice & Peters, refrigerator service -^i '^ 

Grand & Toy. cabinet ^ ^ 

Guaranteed Exterminating Co oc rr 

J. F. Hartz Co.. chemicals, etc in 17 

Harvard University c-q !I 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals, ether, etc i^ 07 

Johnson-Matthey Co.. crucibles 16 07 

Journal of Biological Chemistry, subscriptions 44 »y 

"The Lancet." reprints [' °i 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, ether 'jf j^' 

Naylor & Naylor. speed power unit ^^65 

Neill Co.. reprints • • • • ■ • „i.V S 

Ontario Agricultural College, eggs and chickens f^n al 

C. F. Palmer (London) Ltd.. respiration pump oU9 94 

J. F. Parkinson, stimulator im '^n 

H. W. Petrie Ltd.. reconditioning lathe, etc oi nl 

Ralston Purina Co.. feed Jo "^ 

Screen & Sound Service Ltd.. parts for colorimeter ^^ i^ 

Stark & Tube, amperites ..... |0 00 

Toronto General Hospital, mechanical mill j^ ^ 

University College, London, glass apparatus • • • • ^^ '^o 

University Laboratory of Physiology, special camera with timing 

device , , Ur 

Universitv Press. Cambridge, reprints i i ^^ 

Weston Electrical Instrument Corporation, analyzer .^V ^-^ 

Wholesale Radio Co.. radio parts ion or 

University Press, books, stationery, etc lir nri 

Accounts' under $10 (31 1 ^^^ ^ 

Travelling expenses: 

Sir Frederick Banting ?,? n? 

S^.'Sa, ::::::. loo'" 

S:a.^™S:::;;:;::;;:;; 89 64 

J. T. Fallon ^^ •^' 

Sundr>- disbursements by department: 

Postage. «;.56.95; food supplies, S23.74; sundries, $85.43.... 166 1? 

Superintendent's ^ Dept.. freight. $119.78; labour. $108.40: ^^^^^ 

material. $383.50 _ „„ 

Contribution to Pension Funds 

Alterations to Banting In^itute ($8,089.60) : 

Harkness & Hertzberg, building inspection •■•••••••• • „ ''^ VL 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $4,490.10; mater.aL S3..589.50. . 8.079 60 

$63,955 16 

Credited from Banting Research Foundation ^^^2!^ JJ! 

Medical Research. Best 2.500 00 

Silicosis Committee j^" 00 

Sale of old cages • 00 1^ ?2 

Charged to Insulin Committee Grants ______ 55 4.55 16 

$7,500 00 



292 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



fb) Best Research: 

Research Associate, C. H. Best, 12 mos. (see also Department of 

Physiology ) $2,500 00 

Physiology: 

Research Associate. D. Y. Solandt. 12 mos. (on leave of 

absence I $1,700 — $37.50 1,662 50 

Research Assistants: 

H. E. Woodward, 12 mos., $1,800 — $40 1,760 00 

Dr. E. Rhoda Grant. 12 mos.. $1,500 — $32.50 1.467 50 

J. M. Hershey. 9 mos.. $1,000— $20 980 00 

J. F. Sykes, 12 mos.. $1,000 — $20 980 00 

Miss J. P. Griffiths. 12 mos., $850 — $17 833 00 

Mrs. M. S. Welch, 5 mos.. 7 days 545 67 

O. M. Solandt 440 00 

M. J. Wilson (paid also $400 in Anatomy) 400 00 

R A. Mustard 360 00 

Miss J. F. Manery 330 00 

Fellow. C. A. Armstrong (paid also $175 in Anatomy) 250 00 

Head of Technical Staff. F. L. Robinson. 12 mos. (share of 
salary charged to Research — see also Dept. of Physiology) 

$500 — $10 490 00 

Technical Assistants: 

Miss G. I. Harpell, 12 mos.. $950 — $19 931 00 

L. V. Hodgins. 12 mos.. $880 — $17.60 862 40 

G. Scattergood. 12 mos 800 00 

T. Beaton. 12 mos 780 00 

Miss M. L. Palmer. 12 mos 700 00 

Mrs. J. M. D. Williamson. 10 mos 600 00 

Assistant Animal Caretaker, W. Dobbie. 12 mos., $1,000 — $20. . 980 00 
Secretarial Assistants: 

Miss E. F. Dudley Martin, 71/3 mos. (paid also $200 in 
Physiological Hygiene — see below; and $225 in Medical 

Faculty General Expenses) $738.70 — $18.75 719 95 

Miss D. Waugh. 1 month (paid also $50 in Medical Faculty 

General Expenses ) 100 00 

Physiological Hygiene: 

Assistant Professor. E. W. McHenry, 12 mos. (share of salaiy 

charged to Research — see also School of Hygiene) $600— $12 588 00 
Research Associates, each 12 mos.: 

Mrs. Ruth C. Partridge (share of salary charged to Research 

— see also School of Hygiene) $1.200 — $25 1.175 00 

Miss J. H. Ridout (paid also in Connaught laboratories) 

$1,100 — $22.50 1.077 50 

Research Assistant. J. Campbell 300 00 

Technical Assistants: 

C. R. Cowan, 12 mos. (share of salary charged to Research 

— see also School of Hygiene) $400 — $8 392 00 

J. G. Truax. 12 mos. less 4 days 790 00 

Miss M. Luxton, 12 mos 725 00 

Miss L. C. Barber. 12 mos 700 00 

Miss M. E. Hocking, 12 mos 650 00 

Miss A. Jaffray. 12 mos 650 00 

Temporary Secretarial Assistant. Miss E. F. Dudley Martin. 2 

mos. ( see also above ) 200 00 

$26,719 52 
Expenses ($9,713.82) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware $% 03 

Automatic Coil Winder & Electrical Equipment MIfg. Co., meter 52 55 

Ayherst, McKenna & Harrison, drugs 12 35 

R. Gordon Bell, frogs 80 00 

British Drug Houses, chemicals, etc 154 89 

F. J. Burns & Co.. frogs and turtles 113 95 

Baker Platinum Ltd.. platinum sheet wire, etc 22 44 

Cambridge University Press, reprints 13 05 

Campbell Bros. & Co., lamps 54 31 

Canada Packers Ltd.. glands 119 00 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. hardware and glassware 171 92 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. chemicals 63 20 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware and chemicals 825 44 

Canadian Medical .Association, reprints 40 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 293 

Central Scientific Co., glassware, chemicals, etc 146 33 

R. H. Chappell, glassblowing 28 36 

Warren E. Collins, Inc., thermometers, ink, etc 33 41 

Jos. Cooper Ltd., meat 271 83 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd., laboratory uniforms 18 20 

E. Cullen, animals 572 00 

Dental Co. of Canada, drill 20 00 

Dept. of Medical Research, Banting, authorized transfer 2,500 00 

Allan B. Dumont Laboratories, oscillograph unit HI 98 

J. A. Fontaine, frogs 70 00 

A. Gallenkamp & Co., apparatus 29 66 

General Radio Co., radio parts 293 66 

Giles, Rice & Peters Ltd., repairs to frigidaire 10 27 

Ingram & Bell, surgeons' caps, gowns, masks, etc 46 67 

Jem Rubber Co., bags 20 00 

Johnson-Matthey & Co., chemicals 29 65 

Langley. Harris & Co., dog biscuits 60 00 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, ether and chemicals 100 10 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. cabinets and guides 15 65 

C. F. Palmer ( London ) Ltd., screw stand 27 60 

Photographic Service, prints, slides, etc 128 30 

Rainbow Lantern Slide Co., slides 33 95 

Frank Read, dog cages 100 00 

W. Sherwood & Sons, reconditioning motor 25 00 

Tordoff Electric Co., repairs to motors 25 50 

Weston Electrical Instrument Corporation, microammeters 172 91 

A. M. Wicksn. charts 32 20 

Wholesale Radio Service Co., radio parts 191 87 

Yale University, film 23 28 

Zenith Electric Co., tubular resistance 34 28 

University Press, printing and stationery 304 91 

Accounts under $10 (24) 118 96 

Travelling expenses: 

H. Barrett 65 78 

C. H. Best 264 33 

Robt. Chambers 5103 

W. H. Gantt 50 74 

H. Holter 15 80 

Laurence Irving 200 00 

D. A. Irwin 27 55 

R. B. Kerr 22 00 

D. R. McCullough 19 68 

R. Schoenhemier 50 72 

N. B. Tavlor 60 84 

C. B. Weld 200 00 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Postage. §48.82; telegrams and telephone, $58.73; supplies 

and sundries. $97.45 205 00 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $19.73; labour. $463.31; 

material, $393.50 876 54 

Contribution to Pension Funds 188 15 

$36,433 34 

Charged to Insulin Committee Grants 33,933 34 



$2,500 00 



$10,000 no 

$26,665 29 



294 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

APPENDIX III. 

University Press 

Ledger Balances (net) as at 30 June, 1935 $99,793 74 

Transferred to General University Revenue, appropriation by Board of 

Governors for 1935-36 30,000 00 

$69,793 74 

Transactions lor the year ending 30 June. 1936 

Receipts, including $944.57 outstanding and receivable on 

30 June. 1936 $213,002 95 

Interest allowed on net balances 3.020 37 

$216,023 32 

Expenditures 210,446 74 

5,576 58 

Net balance at credit 30 June. 1936 $75,370 32 

NOTE 

Supplementary to the above the Manager of the Press had on hand on 30 June, 
1936. as shown by his records, cash S59.39. accounts receivable (net) $17,622.30, and 
books, microscopes, etc., of an inventory value of $23,385.16. 

Details of Expenditure 
Salaries and wages: 

R. J. Hamilton. Manager. 12 mos.. $5,000 — $155 $4,845 00 

A. Gordon Burns. Assistant Manager. 12 mos.. $3.000 — $75 2.925 00 

Miss E. M. Walker. Secretar>, 12 mos., $1,900 — $42.50 1.857 50 

Miss E. Kempthorne, Cashier. 5 mos. to 30 November (resigned) 

$585.12 — $12.50 572 62 

Miss E. Baguley. Assistant Cashier, 1 July to 30 Nov. (a $22 per 
week. $476.66 — $9.84 ; Cashier. 1 Dec. (ft $24 per week. 

$728 — $15.29 1,179 53 

Clerks: 

Miss M. Beattie. 12 mos.. $1,300 — $27.50 1.272 50 

Miss I. E. MtTaggart. 12 mos.. $1,300— $27.50 1.272 50 

Mrs. Florence Friendship. 12 mos.. $1,092 — $22.30 1,069 70 

Miss W. Hills. 12 mos.. $1,092 — $22.30 1,069 70 

Miss I. Potter. 12 mos 780 00 

G. Edwards. Caretaker. 12 mos., $1,508 — $32.70 1,475 30 

Pay lists, wages of employees 62.622 55 

$80,941 90 

Editorial Services: 

Miss Alison Ewart. General Editor. 12 mos. (paid also $25 from 

University Quarterly) $1,700 — $37.50 $1,662 50 

Miss Mary Thompson. Assistant to General Editor. 12 mos., 

$900 — $18 882 00 

G. W. Brown 500 00 

A. S. P. Woodhouse 475 00 

V. W. Bladen 400 00 

W. P. M. Kennedv 200 00 

A. Brady 175 00 

E. K. Brown 125 00 

J. H. Elliott 25 00 

$4,444 50 

Payments to contributors to publications 1.823 25 

Payment of royalties and returns from sales 1,613 94 

Supplies and general maintenance: 

Alexander & Cable. lithographing diplomas $130 00 

Thos. Allen & Co., books 107 04 

Allyn & Bacon, bonks 139 53 

Alumni Federation. Christmas cards 142 40 

American Book Co.. books 1 10 95 

American Institute of Steel Construction, books 201 36 

American Libran.- Association, books 163 13 

American Medical Association, books 117 16 

D. Appleton Centur>- Co.. books 760 83 

Art Metropole Ltd., brushes, paper, etc 71 55 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 295 



Arthurs-Jone? Ltd.. book 

Baker & Taylor Co.. books 

D. A. Balfour Co., carbon paper, etc 

Barber-Ellis Ltd.. envelopes, paper, etc 

Barnes & Noble, books 

Bausch & Lomb Optica] Co.. magnifiers 

Blackie & Son. books 

P. Blakiston Son & Co.. books 

Bostitch Ltd.. bostitch 

Prof. E. A. Bott. books 

W. Bourne, handbook covers 

R. R. Bowker & Co.. books 

Brigden"s Ltd.. zincs 

F. A. Brockhaus. books 

J. R. Brooks, paper 

Brown Bros., paper, leather, ink. etc 

H. S. Hunt, books 

Buntin-Reid Co.. paper, envelopes, etc 

Bureau of Publications. Teachers' College 

Burroughs Adding Mlaohine Co., rental of machines 

Chas. Bush Ltd.. ink. etc 

Butterworth & Co.. books 

Canada Carbon & Ribbon Co.. carbon paper 

Canada Metal Co.. monotype metal 

Canadian Consolidated Car Co.. cartage 

Canadian Institute of International Affairs, reprints 

Canadian Linotype Ltd 

Canadian Pacific Railway Co.. telegrams 

Canad'an Paper \^liolesale Ltd., covers and papers 

Canadian Pharmaceutical Association, reprints and subscriptions... 

Eugene E. Carroll, sharpening knives 

Carroll's Canadian Metals, metals and screws 

Carswell Co.. books 

Walter A. Carveth Co., instruments, microscopes, etc 

Cassell & Co.. books 

Central Scientific Co.. microscopes and rules 

Chemical Rubber Co.. handbooks 

J. & A. Churchill, books 

Clark University Press, books 

Clarke. Irwin & Co.. books 

Columbia University Press, books 

John Cooper. Agent for W. & R. Chambers, books 

Cooper & Beatty, books 

Copp, Clark Co.. books, etc 

Delany & Pettit. glue 

J. M. Dent & Sons, books 

Dental Items of Interest, books 

Department of Public Printing and Stationery, Year Books and 

pamphlets 

Walter EHckinson & Co... pencils, etc 

Dodd. Meade & Co.. books 

R. S. Doern. books 

Dominion Blank Book Co.. covers, etc 

Dominion Envelope & Cartons Ltd., envelopes 

Doubleday. Doran & Gundy, books 

V. W. Dyas. commissions 

E. B. Eddy Co.. paper 

Edwards Bros., books 

Elliott Addressing Machine Co.. stencils 

.1. E. Emerson, repairs to commutator, etc 

Farrar & Rinehaxt. books 

Forest Press, books 

W. G. Gage & Co.. books and stationery 

Gaulon & Fils. books 

D. Gestetner (Canada) Ltd.. ink and stencils 

Ginn & Co.. books 

Globe Envelopes Ltd.. envelopes 

Gordon. Mackay & Co.. flannel 

Grand & Toy. cards, envelopes, etc 

Gregg Publishing Co 

John Hamilton, commissions 



31 


27 


252 99 


53 05 


2.567 


32 


74 


23 


33 93 


351 


33 


940 


50 


31 


50 


750 


40 


112 


91 


162 


09 


41 


17 


219 


53 


79 00 


2,723 


72 


28 55 


330 01 


52 85 


225 


24 


593 


88 


50 


00 


149 60 


904 


42 


77 


90 


34 20 


170 


21 


47 


57 


363 


45 


97 


50 


38 85 


86 60 


172 46 


1.721 


15 


292 


73 


8.116 47 


237 


63 


230 09 


44 


70 


427 


30 


133 


04 


175 35 


74 58 


2.113 71 


124 69 


893 65 


232 


39 


113 


60 


123 


20 


568 08 


32 00 


885 


04 


53 


36 


62 


22 


43 


90 


3.526 


74 


34 


71 


46 


a-i 


47 


99 


31 


88 


256 


42 


1.647 


27 


923 28 


51 


08 


1.360 49 


61 


00 


43 


55 


77 


93 


47 


01 


439 27 



296 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Harcourt, Brace & Co.. books 150 04 

G. A. Hardie & Co., wipers 56 70 

W. E. Hardman & Co.. ruling % 40 

Harper Bros., books 394 28 

Hart House. Christmas cards 28 52 

Harvard University Press, books 144 45 

W. Heffer & Sons, books ■. 128 70 

Henderson Bros., cards and paper 617 25 

Geo. H. Hendrs Co., books, plasticine and set squares 74 22 

Henry Holt & Co.. books 2,419 23 

H. M. Stationery Office, books 80 18 

John Hopkins Press, books 70 02 

Houghton. Mifflin & Co., books 390 80 

Howard Bros., gilding and stamping 423 17 

Imperial Oil Ltd 41 49 

International Correspondence Schools, books 80 00 

C. H. Johnson & Son, cartage 543 50 

Keuffel & Esser Co.. rules, etc 178 40 

Otto Lange. books 89 18 

Lea & Ferbiger, books , 1,546 27 

The Levi's, wipers 107 13 

Librairie Beuchemin Ltd., books 35 30 

J. B. Lippincott Co., books 65 27 

Longmans. Green & Co.. books 1,673 62 

Luckett Loose Leaf Co., covers and refills 608 99 

Lumlev & Hewitt, paper and rulling 79 35 

McAinsh & Co.. books 3,230 34 

McClelland & Stewart, books 323 69 

McGraw-Hill Book Co., books 2,413 84 

McKinnon Sales, paper 43 22 

Geo. J. McLeod Ltd., books 30 65 

Macmillan Co.. books 6,954 66 

Meredith. Simmons & Co., paste 37 05 

Midwest Book Co 55 19 

Mitchell & McGill, desks and shelving 102 00 

Mono-Lino Typesetting Co 129 62 

Monotype Co 941 13 

J. L. Morrison Co., paper cutting 253 45 

Musson Book Co.. books 27 28 

Thos. Nelson & Sons, books 366 34 

Nichols Advertisers Ltd.. pads 51 84 

Northern Elecric Co., lamps and clock 49 21 

Oxford University Press, books 2.247 20 

Paper Sales Ltd., paper 96 60 

Parker Fountain Pen Co.. pens and repairs 628 58 

R. A. Phillips Ltd.. cushion covers, pennants, etc 137 71 

Photo Engravers & Electrotypers Ltd 1,190 64 

Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons, books 747 81 

Premier Engravers & Electrotypers 477 09 

Prentice. Hall, Inc.. books 32 99 

Princeton University Press, books 29 97 

Provincial Paper Ltd 12.403 85 

Queen City Paper & Twine Co 113 52 

Raine Engraving Co 73 00 

Ratcliffe & Ovey. bostitch and staples 41 00 

Ratcliffe Paper Co 54 65 

Reed Canadian Engravers Ltd 1.812 47 

Reinhold Publishing Co., books 116 30 

Reliance Engravers 242 91 

Remington-Rand Ltd., typewriter and ribbons 162 65 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection and rentals 57 00 

Ronald Press, books 33 31 

Ryerson Press, books and paper 912 44 

S. J. Reginald Saunders, books 70 82 

Carl Schoch, books 587 52 

Chas. Scribner's Sons 266 04 

W. A. Sheaffer Pen Co., ink. pens and repairs 160 50 

Simpkin, Marshall Ltd.. books 3.758 53 

Howard Smith Paper Mills 1,656 15 

Stamford L^niversity Press, books and subscriptions 55 25 

Standard Embossing Co 354 01 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 297 



G. E. Stechert & Co.. books 

Stephens Sales Ltd., ink, paper and stencils 

Sutherland International Despatch 

Victoriano Suarez, books 

Telfer Paper Box Co., filing cases 

Chas. C. Thomas, books 

F. S. Thomas, receipt forms 

Thomson & Co.. envelopes 

Toronto Envelope Co 

Toronto Graphic Arts Council, dues 

Toronto Type Fundry Co., needles, wire, etc 

Townley Printers' Supply & Machinery Co 

Underwood-Elliott-Fisher Co., rental, carbon and ribbons 

United Paper Mills, paper 

Universal Thread Co 

University of Chicago, Home Study Dept., books 

University of Chicago Press, books 

D. Van Nostrand Co., books 

Venus Pencil Co 

Victoria Paper & Twine Co 

Visible Records Ltd 

Geo. Wahr, books 

Waterman's Ideal Pen Co., pens and repairs 

Whyte-Hook Co., paper 

John Wiley & Sons, books 

Williams & W ilkins, books and subscriptions 

H. W. \^ilson Co., books and subscriptions 

Wilson-Munroe Co., paper 

Wiper & Waste Products Ltd 

World Book Co 

Yale University Press, books 

Accounts under S25 (361) 

Advertising, S433.88; postage, $2,154.90; bank exchange, $305.58: 

cleaning, S129.75; freight, etc., S192.37; second-hand books, 

S355.33; sundries, S280.27 

Heat. Sl,118.26; electric current. S783.20; gas, $290.85; telephone, 

$349.20; water. S77.85 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, etc., $844.09; labour, $276.59; 

material, $357.19; Customs entries, $42 

Contributions to Employees" Pensions Account 

Sales Tax, Collector of Customs and Excise , 



APPENDIX IV. 

SUPERINTENDENTS STORES AND SUNDRY L.\BOR ACCOUNT 

Ledger Balance, 30 June. 1935 $10,104 39 

Purchases made during 1935-36: 

Acme Waste Mfg. Co., wipers 78 68 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 2,650 46 

Aluminum Co.. paste 51 82 

Armstrong Cork & Insulation Co., cork covering 645 51 

Armstrong Door Co.. storm sash 28 11 

Associated Chemical Co., chemicals and brushes 118 33 

Atlas Engineering & Machine Co., pump 350 30 

Babcock-Wilcox & Godie-McCulloch, boiler tubes 52 66 

Baines & David, steel rods and bands 278 04 

Roy P. Bambridge. work on truck 28 55 

Bastian-Morley Ltd.. plumber's supplies 706 61 

Bayview Electric Co.. dimmer plates 45 00 

Beardmore Leathers Ltd., belting 28 29 

Beldom's Asbestos Packing & General Mfg. Co., paints, gaskets, etc, .360 01 

Bennett & Wright, plumber's supplies 149 84 

G. C. Bennett & Co.. plaster, etc 84 50 

Berrv Bros, varnish and liquid granite 149 68 

Boeckh Co., brushes and brooms 221 28 



129 20 


328 08 


76 56 


35 78 


140 98 


68 33 


30 10 


390 06 


678 86 


540 00 


67 85 


111 71 


109 40 


2,702 78 


41 29 


37 12 


314 97 


752 80 


158 29 


423 70 


28 13 


46 63 


244 69 


414 83, 


3,291 79 


271 29 


89 50 


883 83 


60 00 


25 63 


158 47 


2.159 84 


3.852 08 


2.619 36 


1,519 87 


559 25 


5.521 88 


JlT'l 6''^ Tn 




$210,446 74 



298 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



J. B. Buckham. supplying and installing apparatus 

Builders' Flooring & Millwork Ltd.. lumber 

Builders" Supplies Ltd.. cement and lime 

Robt. Bury & Co.. lumber 

Buyers" Door & Mtfg. Co.. doors, etc 

Cactizona Products Co.. water treatment 

Canada Building Materials, pipe and plaster 

Canada Hardware Ltd.. locks 

Canada Metal Co.. weights, solder, etc 

Canada Wire & Cable Co.. wire 

Canadian Allis-Chalmers Ltd.. parts for electric motor 

Canadian Asbestos Ltd.. asbestos and lunaber 

Canadian Blower & Forge Co.. fans and blowers 

Canadian Brass Co.. plumber's supplies 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. steel balls 

Canadian General Electric Co.. electrician's supplies...- 

Canadian Germicide Co.. towels 

Canadian Hanson & \ an \^ inkle Co.. brooms 

Canadian Ice Machine Co.. refrigerators and balance 

Canadian Industrial Alcohol Co.. thermometers 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. chemicals and paints 

Canadian Johns-Manville Co.. cement, putty, etc 

Canadian Metal Window & Steel Products, sash 

Canadian National Carbon Co.. batteries, etc 

Canadian National Institute for the Blind, brushes and brooms. . 

Canadian Office & School Furniture Ltd 

Canadian Powers Regulator Co.. thermometers 

Canadian S. K. F. Co., thrust bearings 

Canadian Sirocco Co.. electrician "s supplies 

Canadian Westinghouse Co.. refrigerator, switch, etc 

Canavan Explosion Venting Systems Ltd.. units and mechanism. 

Central Scientific Co.. regulator 

F. W. Chambers & Co.. filters 

Commercial Lithograph Co.. printed forms 

Compressed Air Equipment, compressor 

Comric Lumber Co.. lumber 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co 

Cooksville Co.. brick and tile 

Cooper Bros. & ^ ilson. plumber's supplies 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd.. uniforms 

Crane Ltd.. plumber"s supplies 

Crown Diamond Paint Co 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill Ltd.. plumber's supplies 

Currie Products Ltd.. cement and roofing 

Darnell Corporation of Canada, casters 

Wm. S. Dean, castings, locks, etc 

Delamere & \^ illiams Ltd.. motors 

Detroit Stoker Co.. stokers 

De Walt Machinery Co.. sander 

Diamond Cleanser & Soaps Ltd.. soap. lye. etc 

Diamond State Fibre Co.. fibre, tubing, etc 

W. E. Dillon Co.. steel grilles, etc 

Harvey E. Dodds Ltd.. sponges and felts 

Dominion Bridge Co.. steel bars, etc 

Dominion Carbon Brush Co.. brushes 

Dominion Glass Co.. bottles 

Dominion Linseed Oil Co 

Dominion Oxygen Co 

Dominion Radiator & Boiler Co.. radiator parts 

Dfiminion Rubber Co.. hose 

Dfiminion Wheel & Foundries Ltd.. cast iron 

J. O. Dougall Ltd.. wall covering 

DowTiing & Co.. fuse? and refills 

Drew-Brown Ltd.. turpentine 

C. A. Ehinham Co.. plumber's supplies 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co.. hose 

Durable Mat Co.. mats 

Dustbane Products Ltd.. cleaning compound 

T. Eaton Co.. wall paper, towels, etc 

Ellis & Howard Ltd.. electrician's supplies 

Empire Brass Mfg. Co.. plumber's supplies 



568 50 


127 11 


198 67 


821 98 


563 98 


125 61 


178 63 


44 03 


335 21 


454 15 


30 85 


298 88 


197 97 


145 45 


51 40 


1.080 79 


70 56 


86 85 


2.300 23 


43 24 


144 23 


549 94 


121 00 


345 16 


255 34 


1.143 65 


80 91 


30 21 


672 71 


1.631 68 


713 44 


45 74 


81 32 


203 68 


34 50 


69 32 


256 74 


543 90 


115 01 


394 69 


2.417 43 


78 13 


234 78 


245 38 


34 54 


46 13 


62 02 


647 43 


170 00 


1.759 90 


38 20 


103 96 


91 18 


359 34 


162 64 


33 13 


65 08 


713 42 


522 35 


38 60 


76 42 


325 00 


387 64 


918 10 


533 46 


29 87 


66 38 


100 55 


320 93 


543 n 


1.104 06 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 299 

Empire Co-tlon Mills Ltd.. cotton 36 41 

Evans & Co.. chamois and sponges 55 94 

Exide Batteries of Canada, batteries 200 45 

Fairbank Lumber & Coal Co., lumber 47 00 

E. B. Fielding & Co.. turpentine 153 23 

Thos. Firth & John Brown Ltd.. steel 739 12 

Fitzgerald-McAvoy Wire Goods, window guard 87 97 

Flexo Cotton Products, cheesecloth 40 10 

Garlock Packing Co.. packing 35 93 

General Steel \\ ares Ltd.. cans, pail». etc 299 53 

Giles. Rice & Peters, refrigerator service 46 46 

Good Specialties Ltd.. plumber's supplies 162 48 

Gooderham & Worts Ltd., alcohol 1,667 37 

Geo. W. Grant & Co., metal polish, oil. etc 28 56 

The B. Greening Wire Co., screens, rolls, etc 187 79 

Grinnell Co., plumber's supplies 1,728 50 

Guelph Soaps 29 66 

Gurney Foundry Co.. coil, fire door, etc 208 86 

Joe Hampson. brick, sand, etc 42 75 

Harpham Bros., repairs to tubes and casings 50 82 

W. Harris & Co.. glue 36 68 

Geo. H. Hees, Son & Co.. cord 84 23 

Geo. M. Hendry Co.. blackboards and chalk 26 81 

Otto Higel &. Co.. felt 27 96 

Higgins & Burke, bon ami. matches, etc 146 70 

F. Hogg Nursen, Co.. bulbs 51 60 

Henry Hope & Sons, installing screens 61 00 

Hostess Corporation, vacu-draf t 65 90 

Hotel & Hospital Supply Co.. linen 70 24 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario, lamps 3.935 40 

Hygiene Products Ltd.. disinfectant 166 94 

Imperial Oil Ltd 275 65 

Imperial \ arnish & Color Co.. enamel, etc S4 33 

John Inglis Co.. plates for boiler 202 05 

Interlake Tissue Mills Co.. towels 656 80 

Irwin Lumber Co.. lumber 48 25 

Isard-LeFebre Mfg. Co.. steel doors 51 30 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co.. tiling 1.682 49 

Geo. Keith & Sons, grass seed 200 80 

Kilgour's Ltd.. bags. cups, towels, etc 2.982 81 

Warden King Ltd.. gaskets 66 76 

La France Fire Engine & Foamite Ltd., extinguishers 329 53 

John Leckie Ltd.. rope, glue, etc 62 23 

Arthur S. Leitch Co.. centrifugal pumps, etc 744 81 

Leland Electric Ltd.. electrician's supplies 45 27 

The Levi's, soda ash 35 10 

Lighting Products, brackets, etc 68 94 

Lowe Bros. Co.. white lead, paints, etc 891 41 

Macbeth-Evans Glass Co.. globes 407 48 

McColl-Frontenac Oil Co.. grease and oil 2.643 94 

S. McCord & Co.. builder's supplies 242 24 

MacDonald Mfg. Co.. covers and pails 34 72 

McFarlane Mfg. Co.. hard ware 75 68 

McGregor-McIntyre Iron Works, ladder .50 00 

Alex. McKay Co.. builder's supplies 228 82 

Frank G. MacKay Co.. blackboards, chalk, etc 78 62 

Masco Co.. plumber's supplies 3.436 26 

Geo. B. Meadows Co.. doors and shelves 35 00 

A. Middleton Co.. paints and varnish 447 63 

Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Co.. motors, valves and switches.. 369 86 

Monarch Bras- Mfg. Co.. plumber's supplies 129 65 

Wallie Moore Paint Co.. paints and enamel 432 58 

J. H. Mbrin & Co.. linseed oil. paste, etc .548 15 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co.. plumber's supplies 2,.339 99 

Mount Royal Metal Co.. sheet lead .56 93 

Moyer School .Supplies, chalk and erasers 52 41 

A. Muirhead Co., paint, oil. etc 304 59 

J. Muldoon Ltd.. cement and plaster 65 05 

Mundct Cork & Insulation Ltd.. supplyi.ng and erecting corkboard.. 323 39 

Alexander Murray & Co.. fibre gum 90 24 

National Drug & Chemical Co.. chemicals 60 52 



300 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

National Iron Corporation, pipe 348 72 

John Nelson & Son, lathing and plastering 265 00 

Neptune National Meters Ltd., meter 65 97 

New Sanitary Wipers & Waste Co., cheesecloth 249 35 

Nichols Chemical Co., ammonia, acids, etc 40 35 

Northern Electric Co., electrician's supplies 160 81 

Northern Paint & Varnish Co., paint 96 62 

North York Hydro-Electric Commission 1,314 48 

O'Cedar of Canada, polish and mops 56 68 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., transfer cases 1,094 51 

Ontario Plumbing & Heating Supplies, plumber's supplies 66 01 

Pacific Mills Ltd., paper 1,073 28 

Pannill Door Co., storm sash 48 69 

Paterson Engineering Co., hypo-chlorinators 255 00 

Pease Foundry Co., heating supplies 75 57 

Peckover's Ltd., steel 440 28 

Pedlar People Ltd., steel shelving 204 50 

Permutit Co., water softener 598 00 

Eugene E. Phillips Ltd.. cable 843 52 

W. E. Phillips Co.. wired glass 60 76 

Photographic Service, blue-prints 27 27 

Pilkingfon Bros., glass 1,152 62 ' 

Planet Bicycle Co., holders and key blanks 41 75 

Plibrico Jointless Firebrick Ltd., firebrick 32 26 

Premier Paint Co., paint 66 15 

Price & Burton, calcium chloride 65 34 

Provincial Treasurer of Ontario, car license 48 00 

Robt. T. Purves & Co., asbestos paper and magnesia blocks 810 58 

J. Frank Raw Co., binding 40 47 

Regent Electric Supply Co., electrician's supplies 31 56 

Remington-Rand Ltd., adding machine 95 00 

Renown Plumbing Supplies Ltd., plump 71 85 

Rideau Specialty Co., peat moss 58 75 

Riverdale Garage Ltd., work on car 35 23 

Jas. Robertson Co., plumber's supplies 357 39 

Robinson Clay Products Co., stoneware 144 00 

W. Robinson & Son Converters Ltd., felt 65 93 

Rolls & Darlington, chemicals, etc 388 94 

Roofers" Supply Co.. roofing material S32 81 

Routery Bros., plastering 382 20 

Samuel Son & Co., metal sheets, etc 1.820 23 

Sangamo Co.. repairs to motor 114 41 

Sarco Ltd.. thermostat traps 181 88 

Scarfe & Co., paints, varnish, etc 156 75 

Scythes & Co., plumber's supplies 32 15 

Shannon Bros., hardware 707 08 

Shaw & Wright, hardware 491 64 

W. Sherwood & Son. repairs to motor 509 70 

T. S. Simms & Co., varnish, brushes, etc 173 86 

Robt. Simpson Co., window shades, linen, etc 487 34 

Singer Sewing Machine Co.. machine 61 88 

Frederick R. Smart, hardware 35 75 

Prof. E. A. Smith, distillation of alcohol 261 75 

John B. Smith & Sons, lumber 4.703 11 

L. C. Smith & Corona Typewriters of Canada 145 80 

Square D Co., electrician's supplies 279 72 

.Standard Lime Co., gravel 71 60 

G. F. Sterne & Sons, cement 103 24 

Stevens-Heoner Co.. brushes 28 51 

Stewart & Wood, paint and glue 516 15 

Sturgeons Ltd., varnish, paints, etc 34 49 

B. F. Sturtevant Co.. fans 221 92 

Sun Oil Co.. oil and paint .58 69 

Superior Electric Supply Co 429 .39 

Supertest Petroleum Corporation, gasoline 1,617 93 

Taylor, Forbes Ltd., radiators and boilers 224 51 

Textile Products Ltd., cheese cloth, towels, etc 927 63 

Thayers Ltd.. gasoline and Oil 2.007 08 

Toronto Brick Co., brick 93 52 

Toronto Hydro Electric System 120 00 

Toronto Iron Works, air receiver 61 48 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



301 



Toronto Putty Co.. plaster of paris and putty 33 95 

Treclo Ltd., paint 45 48 

Tremco Mfg. Co.. caulking compound 47 79 

Tuttle & Bailey Mfg. Co.. steel 32 79 

Twiss\\ire Brushes Ltd.. brushes 46 64 

United Steel Corporation, steel 31 99 

Vulcan Asphalt & Supply Co., flooring 320 27 

Z. Wagman & Son. solder 67 84 

C. C. v. akefield & Co., oils and rastrol 506 76 

Westco Pump & Engineering Ltd.. motor 340 65 

White & Co.. hardware 673 07 

Wilkinson. Kompass Ltd.. hardware 326 63 

A. R. Williams Nlachiner^' Co.. machine tools 54' 93 

Window Shades & Fittings, shades 91 64 

G. H. Wood & Co.. soap dispensers Ill 58 

Worr Foundry' Co.. castings 73 43 

A. L. Wynslon Jr. Ltd.. electrician's supplies L358 66 

University Press, stationery, ink. etc 100 14 

Accounts' under $25 ( 143 1 1.225 15 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $328.92; labour, $4,695.61; material. 

$1,340.06 6,364 59 

$105,108 13 

Less gasoline tax refunded 50 38 



Sundry labour as per pay lists: 

Trade mechanics and general workmen $151,756 72 

Firemen, nightwatchmen. etc 50.445 16 

Cleaners and miscellaneous 77.471 14 



Apportionment of the foregoing: 

Labour 

Administration ($12,571.87) : 

Bursar's Office 28 63 

Registrar's Office 12 81 

Superintendent's Office 2.006 74 

Convocation Hall and Simcoe Hall 9.415 80 

President's House 3 90 

Librar^^ ($4,863.78) : 

Maintenance 224 89 

Building 3.641 46 

Royal Ontario Museum 40,908 75 

Athletics. Phvsical Training. Military Studies, etc. 
($6,015.76) ': 

Athletics and Physical Training — Men 100 37 

Athletics and Physical Training — Women 6 91 

Military Studies 4 30 

Hart House 3.222 80 

Women's Building (44 Hoskin .\ve. ) 402 68 

MilitarA Studies Building 769 64 

Faculty of Arts ($51,418.09) : 

Physics 294 13 

Astronomy 56 10 

Geology 186 68 

Mineralogy 91 32 

Chemistry' 880 82 

Biology 6.459 85 

Botany 1,094 81 

History 2 40 

Fine Art 224 25 

Political Economy 3 20 

Psvchclogy 52 73 

Italian and Spanish 10 10 

University Ollcge General Expenses 3 63 

University College Building 8.288 21 

McLennrn Lalxiratorv 2.842 61 

Chemical Building..'. 2.146 12 



$105,057 75 
$115,162 14 





— $279,673 02 




$394,835 16 


Material 


1 4 82 


3 


40 


[ 134 


15 


) 950 69 


) 10 


93 


) 225 


70 


> 771 


73 


; 2.982 66 


25 28 


1 5 


22 


I 1 


45 


) 1.245 31 


1 30 


05 


[ 201 


75 


! 372 


28 


) 95 


29 


1 90 73 


! 38 


41 


! 538 


17 


. 4.427 


15 


684 
) 


15 


. 87 


47 


1 1 


88 


; 171 


31 


1 7 


85 




22 


1.666 


% 


795 88 


: 37S 


10 



302 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Biological Building 3,113 81 

Botany Building 2,597 19 

Baldwin House 691 78 

iNo. 43 St. George Street 500 88 

No. 45 St. George Street 490 03 

No. 47 St. George Street 436 07 

Economics Building 5,266 25 

Psychology Building 1,442 61 

David Dunlap Observatory 2,117 75 

Faculty of Medicine ($28,862.25) : 

Anatomy 204 88 

Pathology and Bacteriology 473 54 

Pathological Chemistry 29 04 

Pharmacy and Pharmacology 20 08 

Bio-Chemistry (including Zymology) 303 83 

Physiology 61 55 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 20 38 

Medicine 19 75 

Surgery 1 20 

Obstetrics and Gynaecology 

Oto-Laryngology 29 40 

Art Service 29 74 

General Expenses 172 33 

Medical Building 3,789 27 

Banting Institute 7,608 81 

Anatomical Building 2,609 40 

Hygiene Building 8,383 07 

School of Hygiene 5 78 

Facuhy of Applied Science ($18,080.14) : 

Electrical Engineering 222 41 

Mechanical Engineering 209 90 

Civil Engineering: Municipal and Structural 13 98 

Civil Engineering: Surveying and Geodesy 53 91 

Mining Engineering 33 35 

Metallurgical Engineering 16 26 

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry 906 78 

School of Architecture 16 12 

Engineering Drawing 68 43 

Applied Physics 120 18 

General Expenses 68 02 

Photographic Service 7 57 

Mining Building (including Mill Building) 5,680 66 

Engineering Building 3,015 89 

Electrical Building 2,666 05 

Geodetic Observatory Building 362 76 

Faculty of Dentistry ($8,229.22) : 

Laboratory and Infirmary Supplies, etc 1,664 37 

Dental Building 4,368 47 

Faculty of Household Science ($3,458.06) : 

Household Science Department 38 90 

Food Chemistry Department 59 09 

Household Science Building 2,765 88 

Faculty of Forestry ($674.20) : 

Maintenance of Department 55 06 

Forestry Building 505 84 

School of Nursing ($2,444.27) : 

Residence Maintenance 188 25 

Building, No. 7 Queen's Park 1,790 02 

Examinations 108 26 

University Extension and Publicity 130 25 

Residences and Women's Union ($18,697.03) : 

Men's Buildings 9,919 64 

Women's Buildings 4,173 24 

Housekeeping Account 604 18 

Central Power Plant 23,595 51 

Miscellaneous and General ($33,130.63) : 

Central Stores 1,028 75 

Grounds 11,506 58 

Protective Service 15,686 38 

Telephones 3,574 90 

Special Research (including Banting and Best) 5,345 93 



650 


29 


514 89 


225 05 


60 


97 


124 31 


56 


14 


692 66 


215 


70 


228 


90 


286 


47 


442 


58 


34 60 


106 87 


636 


12 


256 


26 


11 


41 


157 


48 


4 


59 


3 09 


7 07 


11 


33 


92 


43 


753 64 


936 


70 


441 


33 


924 01 


17 


51 


222 


20 


365 


12 


35 56 


30 07 


148 66 


23 


22 


738 


72 


35 


52 


9 


28 


120 


53 


12 


68 


5 


89 


1,386 


10 


790 31 


628 


30 


65 


71 


1,024 05 


1,172 


33 


20 05 


33 


30 


540 84 


27 


83 


85 47 


25 37 


440 63 


2 37 


68 


52 


947 86 


1,772 


14 


1,279 97 


2,083 


28 


1,311 


25 


22 


77 



4,736 84 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 303 

University Press 276 59 357 19 

Ontario College of Education 12.922 85 1.952 24 

Dunlap Observatory Construction 95 85 100 09 

Work done for University organizations, members of 

staff, sundry incidental accounts, etc. (including 

Accounts Receivable on 30 June $6.319.50) 42.000 90 57.657 78 

Cash sales 468 32 

$279,673 02 $104,589 75 
$384,262 77 

Ledger Balance, 30 June. 1936 $10,572 39 

(Superintendent's Inventory Value, $20,170.02) 

APPENDIX V. 

Ontario College ok Education 

Balance on hand 30 June, 1935 55 073 38 

Receipts, 1935-36: 

Legislative Grant 204,430 00 

Fees of Students 56,062 95 

Aura Lee Grounds 600 00 

$316,166 33 
Expenditure for salaries and maintenance for the year ending 30 June, 1936 272,636 46 



Balance on hand 30 June. 1936 $43,529 87 

Salaries 

J. G. Althouse, Dean (paid also $350 for Extension Work) $6,000 — $205 $5,795 00 
Professors: 

P. Sandiford. Educational Psychology, and Director of Educational 

Research. $5,700 — $190 5.510 00 

F. E. Coombs. Methods in Elementary Subjects (paid also $350 for 
Extension Work) $4.700 — $143 4.557 00 

G. A. Cornish. Methods in Science, $4,700 — $143 4,557 00 

W. C. Ferguson. Methods in Miodern Languages, $4,700 — $143 4.557 00 

G. M. Jones. Methods in English and History. $4,700 — $143 4.557 00 

J. O. Carlisle. Methods in Classics, also Supervisor of Practice- 
Teaching, $5,000 — $155 4,845 00 

Associate Professors: 

Miss W. G. Barnstead. also Director of Library- School. $3,900 — $111 3.789 00 

Miss L. L. Ockley. Household Science. $4,100 — $119 3.981 00 

W. J. Lougheed, Methods in Mattiematics (paid also $186 for 

Extension Work) $4,300 — $127 4.173 00 

W. G. Bennett, Methods in Commercial Subjects. $4,100 — $119. . . 3.981 00 

Assistant Professors: 

Miss Bertha Bassam, Library Science in Library School, $2.7(X) — $66 2.634 00 

B. C. Diltz. Methods in English and History, $3.850 — $109 3.741 00 

J. A. Long. Educational Psychology (paid also $350 for Extension 

Work ) $3,500 — $95 3.405 00 

Lecturers, also Instructors in University Schools: 

Miss A. Marsh. Art. $3,025 — $76 2.949 00 

A. N. Scarrow, Manual Training (paid also $300 for Extension 

Work) $4.000 — $115 3.885 00 

G. N. Bramfitt. Music. $4,000 — $115 3.885 00 

F. Halbus. Physical Training. $3,525 — $% _. . . . 3.429 00 

Griffith Tavlor, Special Lecturer in Geography (paid als-j $3,755 in 

Faculty of Arts) $2,500 — $60 2.440 00 

Miss H. L. Bryans. Instructor. Physical Training. $3,300 —$87 3,213 00 

Miss A. E. Robertson, Lecturer, Household Science, $3,200 — $83 3.117 00 

Miss Sally A. Ballard. Reviser and Instructor in Library Science. Library 
School, from 1 Sept. Ot $1,500 (paid also $195.84 in University 

Library) $1,250 — $27.08 1.222 92 

Instructors in University Schools: 

A. C. Lewis. Headmaster. $4,500 — $135 4.365 00 

R. F. S. Baird. Teacher-Librarian. $3,300 - $87 3.213 00 



304 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



G. A. Cline, $4,000 — $115 3.885 00 

A. G. Croal (paid also $26 for Extension Work) $3.500 — $95 3.405 00 

E. L Daniher. $4,000 — $115 3.885 00 

J. L. Gill. $3.700 — $103 3.597 00 

H. A. Grainger (paid also $166 for Extension Work) $4,000 — $115 3.885 00 

J. A. Irwin. $4,000 — $115 3.885 00 

N. McLeod. $3,800 — $107 3.693 00 

J. H. Mills (paid also $120 for Extension Work) $4,000 — $115. . . 3.885 00 

N. L. Murch. $4,000 — $115 3.885 00 

L. H. Newell. $2,500 — $60 2.440 00 

P. A. Petrie. $3,850 — $109 3.741 00 

C. E. Phillips (paid also $384 as Instructor in Graduate Courses, 
$147 in School of Nursing, and $350 for Extension Work) 

$3,650 — $104 3.545 00 

W . L. C. Richardson. $4,000 — $115 3.885 00 

W. R. Stewart. $2,750 — $67.50 2.682 50 

W. H. Williams (paid also $156 for Extension Work) $4,000 — $115 3.885 00 

J. G. Workman. $4.000 — $115 3,885 00 

G. W. Cochrane. Instructor in Swimming, and Supervisor of U.T.S. 

Athletic Field and Sports. $2,400 — $57 2.343 00 

Special Lecturers in Library School: 
Administration: 

G. H. Locke 700 00 

F. C. Jennings 150 00 

W. S. Wallace. College and University Libraries (paid also as 

Universitv Librarian ) $350 — $7 343 00 

Miss Lillian H. Smith. Work with Boys and Girls 450 00 

Miss Jean Merchant. School Libraries. . . , 150 00 

Miss Edna M. Poole. Special Libraries 150 00 

Miss Frances Trotter. Sior) -telling 150 00 

Occasional Lecturers: 

Mrs. Lurene Lvle 100 GO 

C. R. Sanderson 100 00 

F. Landon 42 70 

Miss K. Moyer 42 55 

E. C. Kyte 34 50 

Mrs. Aimee Kennedy 31 35 

G. S. Brett . . .\ paid also in 30 00 

Victor Lange. . ( University Faculty of Arts 30 00 

E. J. Pratt (paid also in Faculties of Medicine and Dentistry) . . 30 00 

H. C. Gourlav 18 95 

Miss I. Baylis 15 00 

Norman Davies, Lecturer in Methods for Specialists in Agriculture 

(Sessional ) 300 00 

Supply Teachers (fJ $7.50 per day: 

J. I. R. McKnight. 18 days. .1 paid also as Research 135 00 

M. Sniderman. 7% davs. . . . / Assistants (see below) 56 25 

A. H. S. Adams. 3 davs 22 50 

Miss D. A. Thompson. Librarian. $2,400 — $57 2.343 00 

Miss D. Walter. Assistant Librarian. $1.400 — $30 1.370 00 

Clerical Staff: 

Miss L. Swinarton. Secretary. $1,950 — $43.75 1.906 25 

Clerks: 

Miss E. G. Seldon. $1,550 — $33.75 1.516 25 

Miss G. Potter. $1,350 — $28.75 1.321 25 

Miss J. M. Jeffrey. $1,250 — $26.25 1.223 75 

Miss G. M. Harvev. $1,100 — $22.50 1,077 50 

$166,053 22 

Retiring Allowances: 

Teachers' Insurance and Annuity Association, contribution of College 

for year endins 30 June. 1936. to fund for retiring $3,357 % 

Contribution of College for year ending 30 June. 1936. to University 

Pensions Fund — Employees 924 92 

$4,282 88 

Charges on Investment: 

Accountant. Supreme Court of Ontario, proportion of annual payment on debenture 

issue of 1909 for interest and sinking fund $10,000 00 

Maintenance of Building: 
Fuel ($3,142,711: 

Great Lakes Coal Co $30 05 

Standard Fuel Co 3.112 66 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



305 



Gas. S258.20; electric current. $2,752.69; water. S288.74; telephone 

service, $358.14 3,657 77 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 633 60 

Cleaning ($5,763.20) : 

New York Window Cleaning Co 71 50 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 5,691 70 

Repairs and renewals ($2,881.34) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son. shades and repairs 21 52 

Canadian Powers Regulator Co.. repairs to control system 57 06 

Engineering Equipment Co.. enamel 180 00 

Provincial Treasurer, public hall license 10 00 

Robt. Simpson Co.. supplying and laying linoleum 86 46 

Accounts under $10 ( 3 ) 20 93 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $1,618.85; material, $886.52.... 2.505.37 

Grounds: 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $855.59; material. $3.14 858 73 

Caretaker and Engineer ($1,505.29) : 

S. Hunter, 1 month to 31 July. $158.33 — $3.54 ( retired ) 154 79 

J. Harding, 12 mos. to 30 June, $1,380 — $29.50 1,350 50 

Fireman. G. Thomson, 41 weeks 900 00 

Nightwatchmen ($1,366.99) : 

H. McLeod. 12 mos.. $1,260 — $26.50 1,233 50 

A. Smith. 12 nights 41 36 

W. Gordon. 1 month, 13 nights 92 13 

$20,709 63 
Less credits: Cleaning, etc.. $463.86; fuel, light, etc., $379.92; 

telephone, $35.33 879 11 

Maintenance of Aura Lee Grounds: 
Fuel: 

Central Coal Co $294 49 

Gas. $24.56; electric current. $60.12; water, $36.63; taxes, $2.34; 

telephone, $90.08 213 73 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 8 07 

Repairs and occasional labour ($886.23) : 

Citv of Toronto, erecting fence 73 o9 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $611.34; material. S201.30 812 64 

Caretaker, G. Cruikshank, 12 mos. to 30 June (with living quarters 

valued @ $200) 11,150 — $23.75 1,126 25 

Maintenance of Instruction: 
Use of City Schools: 

Board of Education. City of Toronto $42,934 00 

Use of Rural Schools ($566) : 

Honoraria as critic teachers — Agriculture: 

Principal R. H. King 145 00 

D. G. MacBain 170 00 

W. A. Porter 170 00 

Dean Althouse. expenses of students. Specialists in Agriculture 81 00 
Payments to Librarians who assist in practical work ($775) : 

Miss L. Booth 50 00 

Miss G. Boyle 50 00 

Miss M. Finch 50 00 

Miss V. Hvland 25 00 

Miss J. McCally 50 00 

Miss VL L. Newton 25 00 

Miss S. Robinson -50 00 

Miss J. Thomson 50 00 

Miss A. Wright 50 00 

Miss K. Burkhardt 50 00 

Miss H. Chadwick 50 00 

Miss M. Foreman 50 00 

Miss E. Mcintosh 50 00 

Miss F. Murray 50 00 

Miss E. St. John 50 00 

Miss B. Steele 25 00 

Miss C. A. Wood 50 00 



119,830 52 



$2,528 77 



306 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Laboratory and library assistance and pianist's services ($259.10) : 

Mrs. S. McKerrighan, 370 hours (n 33c 

Mrs. M. Graham, pianist, 137 hours © $1 

Office supplies ($1,952.35) : 

Art Metropole. paper 

D. Gestetner (Canada) Ltd.. ink and stencils 

Grand & Toy. files, guides and desk trays 

National Stationers Ltd.. folders 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., folders and sections 

Postage 

Remington-Rand Ltd.. cardex cabinet 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 

Roneo Co. of Canada, stencils 

Thomas & Corney Typewriters Ltd.. typewriter 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Sundry disbursements by department 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $35.30;. material. $8.90 

Office supplies for Library School ($134.78) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son. shades 

Grand & Toy, rubber bands and foolscap 

Mitchell & McGill, tables 

Postage 

Sundry disbursements by department 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $54.63; material, $11.42 

General supplies and apparatus for class room use ($3, 6%. 78) : 

F. E. Becker & Co., hygrometer 

Baird & Tatlock, weights 

British Drug Houses, chemicals, etc 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. acids, etc 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals and glassware 

Central Scientific Co., chemicals and glassware 

City Dairy 

Clarke, Irwin Co., books 

F. E. Cleland. provisions 

Copp, Clark Co.. chalk, books, etc 

T. Eaton Co., cloths, linoleum and sundries 

Encyclopaedia Britannica of Canada 

Glen Starr, subscriptions 

Heintzman Co., rental of piano and repairs 

Philip Harris & Co., magnet accessories and electroscopes 

Geo. M. Hendry Co., blackboard, etc 

R. Laidlaw Lumber Co 

Langlcys Ltd.. curtains cleaned 

Library of Congress, cards, etc 

Jas. Lumbers Co.. matches 

Jos. McI>owell & Co.. repairs to calculator 

Macmillan Co., books 

C. P. Randall, music, text books and repairs 

Roneo Co.. paper and stencils 

Leslie V. Smith, lettering , 

Textile Products Co., linens 

Underwood-Elliott-Fisher Co., typewriter rentals 

Warwick Bros. & Rutter, paper 

Weston Electrical Instrument Co., candle meter, candles, etc... 

Wilson Scientific Co., glassware, tubing, etc 

Payments to Examiners, extra-mural candidates: 

J. G. Althouse. $29.63; W. G. Bennett. $68.90; J. 0. Carlisle, 
$24.75; F. E. Coombs. $13.13; G. A. Cornish. $49.13; 
:B. C. Diltz, $33; W. C. Ferguson. $26.25; G. M. Jones, 
$37.88; J. A. Long. $13.13; W. J. Lougheed, $21.38 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (27) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Hardware. $10.45; art supplies and sundries, $8.78 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $4.15; labour, $354.71; material, 

$138.19 

Supplies and equipment for Library School ($901.16) : 

American Library Association, books and subscriptions 

Bookshelf Bindery, books 

R. R. Bowker Ck)., books and maps 

Columbia University Press, books 



122 


10 


137 


00 


1 


81 


146 


76 


141 


95 


11 


00 


56 87 


361 


00 


126 00 


66 


75 


18 


98 


129 60 


834 


30 


13 


13 


44 20 


34 83 


1 


90 


12 


00 


10 00 


10 


00 


66 05 


17 


02 


31 


72 


18 63 


22 36 


144 


12 


231 


39 


16 


15 


49 62 


71 65 


79 


22 


72 


20 


102 


50 


63 


25 


102 00 


57 


% 


10 


78 


71 


07 


16 


20 


49 


49 


28 


50 


20 00 


22 


97 


16 


00 


12 


08 


67 


55 


36 94 


427 


38 


215 09 


24 77 


185 


29 



317 


18 


465 81 


113 


61 


19 


23 


497 05 


48 


26 


24 80 


13 


17 


16 86 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1936 



307 



Gordon & Gotch, subscriptions 

Grafton & Co.. books 

Library' Association, books and subscriptions 

Library of Congress, cards 

Lowe-Martin Co., cards 

Martin A. McGoff . books 

Musson Book Co.. books 

Oxford University Press, books 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 

Ryerson Press, books 

L. C. Smith & Corona Typewriters Ltd., typewriter rental 

Toronto Public Library, books 

University Associates of Canada, encyclopaedia 

J. Whitaker & Sons, catalogue 

H. W. Wilson & Co., books and subscriptions 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (14) 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $3.23; labour. $37.31; material, 

$10.48 

Library books, periodicals, etc. ($737.69) : 

Bookshelf Bindery, buckram fabrikoid 

Evans Bros., subscriptions 

Library of Congress, cards 

Lowe-Martin Co., cards, etc 

McAinsh & Co., dictionary 

Ryerson Press, books 

H. W. Wilson & Co.. subscriptions 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (12) 

Physical training, including care of grounds. Field Dav sports, etc. 
($741.24): 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., rebuilt scale 

Eastman Kodak Stores, camera box, films and prints 

Lackie Mfg. Co.. medals and engraving 

United-Carr Fastener Co., locks 

University Arena, rental 

Harold A. Wilson, balls, racquets, gymnasium equipment and 

repairs 

Accounts under $10 (2) 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $45.93; material. $50.56 

Lunchroom equipment ($56.58) : 

Cassidy's Ltd., dishes 

General Steel Wares Ltd., cooking utensils 

Graduate Courses and Summer Session ($1,834* : 
Instructors: 

J. G. Althouse 

F. E. Coombs 

Miss D. M. Livingston 

J. A. Long 

C. E. Phillips 

Department of Educational Research: 
Research Assistants ($5,216.72) : 

M. A. Cameron. 12 mos., $2,500 — $60 

C. B. Conway. 12 mos., $1,000 — $20 

J. L R. McKnight. 10 mos. (paid also $135 as supply 
teacher) $833.30 — $16.60 

M. Sniderman. 10 mos. (paid also $56.25 as supply teacher) 
$833.30 — $16.60 

C. E. Smith. 2 mos.. $166.66 — $3.34 

Secretary, Miss K. M. Hokday. 12 mos.. $1,600 — $35 

Clerical assistance ($1,573.35) : 

Miss M. Graham, 12 mos., $1,000 — $20 

Miss M. Spalding, 39 weeks, 2 days 

R. T. Burgess, 1 day 

Office supplies, printing, etc. ($1,997.32) : 

Art Metropole. drawing instruments 

D. Gestetner (Canada) Ltd., ink and stencils 

Postage 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 



95 18 
18 62 

20 69 

15 31 
62 67 

16 43 

21 70 
26 03 
39 50 
21 36 
30 00 
11 50 
24 75 
16 38 
81 72 

204 13 
41 08 

51 02 



45 


78 


13 


78 


34 44 


22 


45 


31 


05 


14 


74 


39 47 


496 


43 


39 


55 


19 60 


23 


10 


190 


64 


100 00 


100 00 


202 


94 


8 47 


% 49 


34 


62 


21 


96 


350 


00 


350 00 


50 00 


350 00 


734 00 


2.440 00 


980 


00 


816 


70 


816 


70 


163 


32 


1.565 00 


980 


00 


590 00 


3 


35 


17 64 


60 


74 


72 


50 


48 


70 



508 



^5^^5I0LI1EJNIVERSITY^^ 1936 ^o. 12 



Toronto Radio & Sports Ltd., radio parts. . 09 7. 

University Press, printing and stationery. ..[ l JHo 

Accounts under $10 (4) ^'"">^ '^ 

Sundry disbursements by department- ^^ *^^ 

pubiicatio7of"T''l"l'' P''p'-'/:5''^^i' «97.2oVn;ateVia];6;:::;::: 97 II 

rubl cation of T e School and distribution in Training Schools- 
The School; subscriptions.... »•"» ^cnooj*. 

5,000 00 



$69,941 07 
$272,636 46 



4 



BINDING L— NOVl 1940 



I